A history of roaring prosperity—and economic cataclysm: “The one account of America in the 1920s against which all others must be measured” (The Washington Post). Beginning November 11, 1918, when President Woodrow Wilson declared the end of World War I in a letter to the American public, and continuing through his defeat, Prohibition, the Big Red Scare, the rise of women’s hemlines, and the stock market crash of 1929, Only Yesterday, published just two years after the crash, chronicles a decade like no other. Allen, who witnessed firsthand the events he describes, immerses you in the era of flappers, speakeasies, and early radio, making you feel like part of history as it unfolds. This bestselling, enduring account brings to life towering historical figures including J. Pierpont Morgan, Henry Ford, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Al Capone, Babe Ruth, and Jack Dempsey. Allen provides insightful, in-depth analyses of President Warren G. Harding’s oil scandal, the growth of the auto industry, the decline of the family farm, and the long bull market of the late twenties. Peppering his narrative with actual stock quotes and breaking financial news, Allen tracks the major economic trends of the decade and explores the underlying causes of the crash. From the trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti to the inventions, crazes, and revolutions of the day, this timeless work will continue to be savored for generations to come.
Ivar Kreuger (1880 – 1932) war die zentrale Figur des europäischen Zündwarenmonopols, ein genialer Geschäftsmann seiner Zeit. Faszinierend ist in erster Linie sein Erfindungsreichtum, mit dem er komplexe Finanzinstrumente entwickelte, um seine Transaktionen undurchsichtig zu machen. Nach seinem Selbstmord und dem Zusammenbruch seines Imperiums kamen immer mehr betrügerische Einzelheiten ans Licht. Sie führten schließlich zu den Wertpapiergesetzen von 1933 und 1934 in den USA, die u. a. Finanzderivate streng regulierten. Frank Partnoy hat diesen spannenden Stoff akribisch recherchiert und großartig nach-erzählt. Sein Buch zeichnet ein genaues Bild der schillernden Figur Ivar Kreuger und seiner dubiosen Methoden als Finanzgenie. Partnoy liefert ein Lehrstück aus der Vergangenheit mit klaren Bezügen zu vielen Fällen und Vorgängen der neuzeitlichen Finanzbranche: Bernie Madoff. Bernie Ebbers. Lehman. Flowtex.
Eine Anleitung zum Nach-, Quer- und Gegendenken »Ich weiß, dass ich nichts wei߫, erkannte bereits Sokrates. Wie wir aber mit dem Unbekannten, mit dem, was wir nicht wissen, faktisch umgehen und idealerweise umgehen sollten, das beschreibt der Risikoforscher und Essayist Nassim Nicholas Taleb in seinem Handbuch. Er enthüllt die Begrenztheiten unserer Datenverliebtheit genauso wie die folgenschweren Irrtümer und Voreingenommenheiten unseres Denkens. So zeigt er, wie uns Denkfehler, falsche Kategorien und blinde Flecken immer wieder in die Irre führen – und wie wir mit Unwissen gewinnbringend umgehen können. Denn: »Für den einen ist ein Irrtum bloß ein Irrtum, für den anderen ist er eine Information.«
Die Lebensgeschichte einer ungewöhnlichen Frau, die sich Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts in Arizona als Lehrerin, Rancherin, Flugzeugpilotin, aber auch als Pokerspielerin und Schnapsschmugglerin bewährt, aus in der Familie erzählten Geschichten aufgezeichnet von ihrer Enkelin.
Covers significant eras in U.S. history. Encourages students to analyze evidence, documents, and other data to make informed decisions. Includes guidelines for students, answer prompts, and a scoring rubric. Develops essential writing skills.
The Routledge Handbook of U.S. Military and Diplomatic History provides a comprehensive analysis of the major events, conflicts, and personalities that have defined and shaped the military history of the United States in the modern period. Each chapter begins with a brief introductory essay that provides context for the topical essays that follow by providing a concise narrative of the period, highlighting some of the scholarly debates and interpretive schools of thought as well as the current state of the academic field. Starting after the Civil War, the chapters chronicle America's rise toward empire, first at home and then overseas, culminating in September 11, 2001 and the War on Terror. With authoritative and vividly written chapters by both leading scholars and new talent, maps and illustrations, and lists of further readings, this state-of-the-field handbook will be a go-to reference for every American history scholar's bookshelf.
Dryden's Second Hundred Years (Part I) chronicles life in a small farming village in Central New York during the first half of the twentieth century. But along with a close reading of the local scene-its telephones, roads, real and rumored milk strikes, and letters back home from the trenches of two wars-this narrative has a wide arc and rich texture: author Elizabeth Denver Gutchess dovetails local history with national and international events which shaped and countered it-as she explores connections and disconnections between this small community and the world at large. Essentially, in fact, Dryden's Second Hundred Years records a transformation of place, as Dryden's tightly woven social fabric slowly unraveled during the century, while ever-lengthening strands of road and cable reached farther and farther beyond this small hill-rimmed valley-weaving ever wider and more life-enhancing communities for the people who live here. At a time when the process of globalization outweighs all things local, however, it is important to keep balance. The global village, as many have warned, will be enriched not by neglecting the local but by taking care of it. One way to do that is simply to know and understand the local past. Like the body of fine work already produced by Dryden historians-and by local historians everywhere-this book might help us do that.
Satan in the Dance Hall explores the overwhelming popularity of social dancing and its close relationship to America's rapidly changing society in the 1920s. The book focuses on the fiercely contested debate over the morality of social dancing in New York City, led by moral reformers and religious leaders like Rev. John Roach Straton. Fed by the firm belief that dancing was the leading cause of immorality in New York, Straton and his followers succeeded in enacting municipal regulations on social dancing and moral conduct within the more than 750 public dance halls in New York City. Ralph G. Giordano conveys an easy to read and full picture of life in the Jazz Age, incorporating important events and personalities such as the Flu Epidemic, the Scopes Monkey Trial, Prohibition, Flappers, Gangsters, Texas Guinan, and Charles Lindbergh, while simultaneously describing how social dancing was a hugely prominent cultural phenomenon, one closely intertwined with nearly every aspect of American society fromthe Great War to the Great Depression. With a bibliography, an index, and over 35 photos, Satan in the Dance Hall presents an interdisciplinary study of social dancing in New York City throughout the decade.
From the team’s inception in 1903, the New York Yankees were a floundering group that played as second-class citizens to the New York Giants. With four winning seasons to date, the team was purchased in 1915 by Jacob Ruppert and his partner, Cap “Til” Huston. Three years later, when Ruppert hired Miller Huggins as manager, the unlikely partnership of the two figures began, one that set into motion the Yankees’ run as the dominant baseball franchise of the 1920s and the rest of the twentieth century, capturing six American League pennants with Huggins at the helm and four more during Ruppert’s lifetime. The Yankees’ success was driven by Ruppert’s executive style and enduring financial commitment, combined with Huggins’s philosophy of continual improvement and personnel development. While Ruppert and Huggins had more than a little help from one of baseball’s greats, Babe Ruth, their close relationship has been overlooked in the Yankees’ rise to dominance. Though both were small of stature, the two men nonetheless became giants of the game with unassailable mutual trust and loyalty. The Colonel and Hug tells the story of how these two men transformed the Yankees. It also tells the larger story about baseball primarily in the tumultuous period from 1918 to 1929—with the end of the Deadball Era and the rise of the Lively Ball Era, a gambling scandal, and the collapse of baseball’s governing structure—and the significant role the Yankees played in it all. While the hitting of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig won many games for New York, Ruppert and Huggins institutionalized winning for the Yankees.
American evangelicalism has long walked hand in hand with modern consumer capitalism. Timothy Gloege shows us why, through an engaging story about God and big business at the Moody Bible Institute. Founded in Chicago by shoe-salesman-turned-revivalist Dwight Lyman Moody in 1889, the institute became a center of fundamentalism under the guidance of the innovative promoter and president of Quaker Oats, Henry Crowell. Gloege explores the framework for understanding humanity shared by these business and evangelical leaders, whose perspectives clearly differed from those underlying modern scientific theories. At the core of their "corporate evangelical" framework was a modern individualism understood primarily in terms of economic relations. Conservative evangelicalism and modern business grew symbiotically, transforming the ways that Americans worshipped, worked, and consumed. Gilded Age evangelicals initially understood themselves primarily as new "Christian workers--employees of God guided by their divine contract, the Bible. But when these ideas were put to revolutionary ends by Populists, corporate evangelicals reimagined themselves as savvy religious consumers and reformulated their beliefs. Their consumer-oriented "orthodoxy" displaced traditional creeds and undermined denominational authority, forever altering the American religious landscape. Guaranteed pure of both liberal theology and Populist excesses, this was a new form of old-time religion not simply compatible with modern consumer capitalism but uniquely dependent on it.
The Modern American Metropolis: A Documentary Reader introduces the history of American cities and suburbs through a collection of original source materials that historians have long used to make sense of the urban experience. Carefully integrates and juxtaposes the primary sources that are at the heart of the collection Revisits and compares issues and themes over time Reveals how the history of cities and suburbs is not limited to buildings, innovation, and politics, and not confined to municipal boundaries Explores a wide variety of topics, including infrastructure development, electoral politics, consumer culture, battles over rights, environmental change, and the meaning of citizenship
On the morning of June 1, 1921, a white mob numbering in the thousands marched across the railroad tracks dividing black from white in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and obliterated a black community then celebrated as one of America's most prosperous. 34 square blocks of Tulsa's Greenwood community, known then as the Negro Wall Street of America, were reduced to smoldering rubble. And now, 80 years later, the death toll of what is known as the Tulsa Race Riot is more difficult to pinpoint. Conservative estimates put the number of dead at about 100 (75% of the victims are believed to have been black), but the actual number of casualties could be triple that. The Tulsa Race Riot Commission, formed two years ago to determine exactly what happened, has recommended that restitution to the historic Greenwood Community would be good public policy and do much to repair the emotional as well as physical scars of this most terrible incident in our shared past. With chilling details, humanity, and the narrative thrust of compelling fiction, The Burning will recreate the town of Greenwood at the height of its prosperity, explore the currents of hatred, racism, and mistrust between its black residents and neighboring Tulsa's white population, narrate events leading up to and including Greenwood's annihilation, and document the subsequent silence that surrounded the tragedy.
This book is a story of Presidential failure, a chronicle of Woodrow Wilson’s miscalculations in war, and a harrowing account of the process through which an intelligent American leader fell to pieces under a burden he could not bear. Historian Richard Striner argues persuasively that President Woodrow Wilson failed his responsibilities as a wartime leader in World War I. With the patience of a prosecuting attorney, Striner presents the facts of Wilson’s wartime situation, considers the options that were open to him, explains his decision-making process, and then critiques his failure to engage in sufficient contingency planning as events played out. Striner interweaves narration, analytical commentary, and quotations from Wilson’s advisors and contemporaries to convey the feeling of history as sensed by the people who were making it. Striner argues that as America entered the war, Wilson’s character flaws emerged, worsened by medical conditions that clinicians have diagnosed as having reached the point of dementia by 1919. This tragic story of presidential leadership failure will be of interest to all readers of America’s military history and the American presidency.
Combining rich historical detail and a harrowing, pulse-pounding narrative, Close to Shore brilliantly re-creates the summer of 1916, when a rogue Great White shark attacked swimmers along the New Jersey shore, triggering mass hysteria and launching the most extensive shark hunt in history. In July 1916 a lone Great White left its usual deep-ocean habitat and headed in the direction of the New Jersey shoreline. There, near the towns of Beach Haven and Spring Lake--and, incredibly, a farming community eleven miles inland--the most ferocious and unpredictable of predators began a deadly rampage: the first shark attacks on swimmers in U.S. history. For Americans celebrating an astoundingly prosperous epoch, fueled by the wizardry of revolutionary inventions, the arrival of this violent predator symbolized the limits of mankind's power against nature. Interweaving a vivid portrait of the era and meticulously drawn characters with chilling accounts of the shark's five attacks and the frenzied hunt that ensued, Michael Capuzzo has created a nonfiction historical thriller with the texture of Ragtime and the tension of Jaws. From the unnerving inevitability of the first attack on the esteemed son of a prosperous Philadelphia physician to the spine-tingling moment when a farm boy swimming in Matawan Creek feels the sandpaper-like skin of the passing shark, Close to Shore is an undeniably gripping saga. Heightening the drama are stories of the resulting panic in the citizenry, press and politicians, and of colorful personalities such as Herman Oelrichs, a flamboyant millionaire who made a bet that a shark was no match for a man (and set out to prove it); Museum of Natural History ichthyologist John Treadwell Nichols, faced with the challenge of stopping a mythic sea creature about which little was known; and, most memorable, the rogue Great White itself moving through a world that couldn't conceive of either its destructive power or its moral right to destroy. Scrupulously researched and superbly written, Close to Shore brings to life a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history. Masterfully written and suffused with fascinating period detail and insights into the science and behavior of sharks, Close to Shore recounts a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history with startling immediacy. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Traces the history of teenagers in the United States, including their influence on the economy, fashion, and entertainment.
The story opens with the purchase of a 9mm Browning at a small Paris gun shop by a man named Ivar Kreuger. The next morning, the world's leading bankers nervously waited to ask Ivar about some forged Italian bonds. Hours later, his dead body was discovered and the largest financial empire of the era collapsed. This book traces Ivar's meteoric rise from the obscurity of provincial Sweden, to become a construction mogul and then a global business oligarch. Ivar acquired match monopolies throughout the world and usurped J. P. Morgan to become the leading lender to foreign governments. His financial innovations resonate today. A self made media figure, he discovered and promoted Greta Garbo but also advised politicians, including President Hoover. Was he a financial genius or merely a schemer? Did he really stage his own suicide? This book brings back to life one of the greatest swindlers of all times.
With the analysis of the best scholars on this era, 29 essaysdemonstrate how academics then and now have addressed thepolitical, economic, diplomatic, cultural, ethnic, and socialhistory of the presidents of the Republican Era of 1921-1933 -Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover. This is the first historiographical treatment of along-neglected period, ranging from early treatments to the mostrecent scholarship Features review essays on the era, including the legacy ofprogressivism in an age of “normalcy”, the history ofAmerican foreign relations after World War I, and race relations inthe 1920s, as well as coverage of the three presidential electionsand a thorough treatment of the causes and consequences of theGreat Depression An introduction by the editor provides an overview of theissues, background and historical problems of the time, and thepersonalities at play

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