During the later eighteenth century the Bible underwent a shift in interpretation so radical as to make it virtually a different book from what it had been a hundred years earlier. Even as historical criticism suggested that the Bible's text was neither stable nor original, the new notion of the Bible as a cultural artifact became a paradigm of all literature. Not merely was English, German and French Romanticism steeped in Biblical references of a new kind, but theories of literature and criticism came to be Biblically derived.
Features:• Wide chronological coverage of English literature, especially texts found in the Norton, Oxford, Blackwell and other standard anthologies• Short, punchy essays that engage with the texts, the critics, and literary and social issues• Background and survey articles• Glossaries of Bible themes, images and narratives• Annotated bibliography and questions for class discussion or personal reflection• Scholarly yet accessible, jargon-free approach – ideal for school and university students, book groups and general readersCreated for readers who may be unfamiliar with the Bible, church history or theological development, it offers an understanding of Christianity’s key concepts, themes, images and characters as they relate to English literature up to the present day.
"The Book of God manages to be at once ambitious, deliberate, and nuanced in its interconnecting conceptions of philosophy and literary criticism."—Orrin Wang, University of Maryland
This reference contains academic papers by rising scholars trained in the United Kingdom.
This book provides the first complete guide for students to the present state of biblical studies. The twenty-one specially commissioned chapters are written by established scholars from North America and Britain, and represent both traditional and contemporary points of view. The chapters in Part One cover all the methods and approaches currently practised in the academic study of the Bible, while those in Part Two examine the major categories of books in the Bible from the perspective of recent scholarship - e.g. historical books of the Old Testament, Gospels, prophetic literature. Major issues raised are: the relation of modern 'critical' study of the Bible to 'pre-critical' and 'post-critical' approaches; the place of history in the study of the Bible; feminist, liberationist and new historicist concerns; the relation of Christian and Jewish scholarship; and recent interest in the Bible as literature.
Readers of Emily Brontë's poetry and of Wuthering Heights have seen in their author, variously, a devout if somewhat unorthodox Christian, a heretic, or a visionary "mystic of the moors". Rather than seeking to resolve this matter, Emily Brontë and the Religious Imagination suggests that such conflicting readings are the product of tensions, conflicts and ambiguities within the texts themselves. Rejecting the idea that a single, coherent set of religious doctrines are to be found in Brontë's work, this book argues that Wuthering Heights and the poems dramatise individual experiences of faith in the context of a world in which such faith is always conflicted, always threatened. Brontë's work dramatises the experience of imaginative faith that is always contested by the presence of other voices, other worldviews. Her characters cling to visionary faith in the face of death and mortality, awaiting and anticipating a final vindication, an eschatological fulfilment that always lies in a future beyond the scope of the text.
This comprehensive, accessible guidebook traces the ways in which human beings have used narrative to make sense of time, space and identity over the centuries. Particular attention is given to: * early narrative, from Hellenic and Hebraic * the rise of the novel * realist representation * imperialism and narrative * modernism and cinema * postmodern narrative * narrative and new technologies. With a strong emphasis on clarity and a range of examples from oral cultures to cyberspace, this is the ideal guide to an essential critical topic.
Culls together important criticism of fantastic literature from Plato and Aristotle to present critics.
There is no book more important for our culture than the Bible, and it is fundamental to the study of English literature and language.
Stephen Prickett explores the 'narrative' in ways of thinking about the world over 300 years.
Stephanie Day Powell illuminates the myriad forms of persuasion, inducement, discontent, and heartbreak experienced by readers of Ruth. Writing from a lesbian perspective, Powell draws upon biblical scholarship, contemporary film and literature, narrative studies, feminist and queer theories, trauma studies and psychoanalytic theory to trace the workings of desire that produced the book of Ruth and shaped its history of reception. Wrestling with the arguments for and against reading Ruth as a love story between women, Powell gleans new insights into the ancient world in which Ruth was written. Ruth is known as a tale of two courageous women, the Moabite Ruth and her Israelite mother-in-law Naomi. As widows with scarce means of financial or social support, Ruth and Naomi are forced to creatively subvert the economic and legal systems of their day in order to survive. Through exceptional acts of loyalty, they, along with their kinsman Boaz, re-establish the bonds of family and community, while preserving the line of Israel's great king David. Yet for many, the story of Ruth is deeply dissatisfying. Scholars increasingly recognize how Ruth's textual "gaps†? and ambiguities render conventional interpretations of the book's meaning and purpose uncertain. Feminist and queer interpreters question the appropriation of a woman's story to uphold patriarchal institutions and heteronormative values. Such avenues of inquiry lend themselves to questions of narrative desire, that is, the study of how stories frame our desires and how our own complex longings affect the way we read.
Esta obra constituye la primera guía completa sobre el estado actual de los estudios bíblicos. Los veintiún capítulos, encargados expresamente a especialistas de reconocido prestigio de Norteamérica y Gran Bretaña, presentan puntos de vista tanto tradicionales como contemporáneos. Los capítulos de la Primera Parte abarcan todos los métodos y enfoques actualmente practicados en el estudio académico de la Biblia, mientras que los de la Segunda Parte examinan los principales bloques de libros de la Biblia desde la perspectiva de la investigación reciente –por ejemplo, los libros históricos del Antiguo Testamento, evangelios, literatura profética...–. Se plantean cuestiones importantes: la relación entre el moderno estudio "crítico" de la Biblia y los enfoques "precríticos" y "postcríticos": el lugar de la historia en el estudio de la Biblia: las inquietudes feministas, liberacionistas y neohistoricistas: la relación entre la investigación cristiana y la judía: y el reciente interés por la Biblia como literatura. Este libro es un instrumento ideal para estudiantes y lectores no especialistas, por su bien cuidado tono de divulgación. JOHN BARTON ocupa la cátedra Oriel and Laing de Interpretación de la Sagrada Escritura en la Universidad de Oxford. Algunos de sus libros son: Reading the Old Testament: Method in Biblical Study (1984, 1996): Oracle of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile (1986): People of the Book? The Authority of the Bible in Christianity (1988): y The Spirit and the Letter: Studies in the Biblical Canon (1997).
Varying degrees of attention are paid to Jesus' four speeches in the Galilean ministry of the Gospel of Luke. Despite increasing interest in ancient Graeco-Roman rhetoric in biblical studies, few scholars examine the speeches from the lens of ancient rhetorical argument. In addition, with the exception of the inaugural speech in Luke 4.14-30, little attention is afforded to the relevance of the speeches for understanding larger nuances of the narrative discourse and how this affects the hermeneutical appropriation of authorial readers. In contrast, Spencer examines each speech from the context of ancient rhetorical argument and pinpoints various narrative trajectories-as associated with theme, plot, characterization, and topoi-that emerge from the rhetorical texture. In doing so, he shows that the four speeches function as "sign posts" that are integral to guiding the Lukan narrative from the "backwaters" of Galilee to the center of the Roman Empire.
A highly original and hugely enjoyable literary and cultural history of joy from ancient times to the present.
The essays in this book criticise the new positivism in education policy, whereby education is systematically reduced to those things that can be measured by so-called 'objective' tests. School curricula have been narrowed with an emphasis on measurable results in the 3 R's and the 'quality' of university departments is now assessed by managerial exercises based on commercial audit practice. As a result, the traditional notion of liberal arts education has been replaced by utilitarian productivity indices.
"The Dread of Difference is a classic. Few film studies texts have been so widely read and so influential. It's rarely on the shelf at my university library, so continuously does it circulate. Now this new edition expands the already comprehensive coverage of gender in the horror film with new essays on recent developments such as the Hostel series and torture porn. Informative and enlightening, this updated classic is an essential reference for fans and students of horror movies."—Stephen Prince, editor of The Horror Film and author of Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality "An impressive array of distinguished scholars . . . gazes deeply into the darkness and then forms a Dionysian chorus reaffirming that sexuality and the monstrous are indeed mated in many horror films."—Choice "An extremely useful introduction to recent thinking about gender issues within this genre."—Film Theory
Children's Bibles have been among the most popular and influential types of religious publications in the United States, providing many Americans with their first formative experiences of the Bible and its stories. In Children's Bibles in America, Russell W. Dalton explores the variety of ways in which children's Bibles have adapted, illustrated, and retold Bible stories for children throughout U.S. history. This reception history of the story of Noah as it appears in children's Bibles provides striking examples of the multivalence and malleability of biblical texts, and offers intriguing snapshots of American culture and American religion in their most basic forms. Dalton demonstrates the ways in which children's Bibles reflect and reveal America's diverse and changing beliefs about God, childhood, morality, and what must be passed on to the next generation. Dalton uses the popular story of Noah's ark as a case study, exploring how it has been adapted and appropriated to serve in a variety of social agendas. Throughout America's history, the image of God in children's Bible adaptations of the story of Noah has ranged from that of a powerful, angry God who might destroy children at any time to that of a friendly God who will always keep children safe. At the same time, Noah has been lifted up as a model of virtues ranging from hard work and humble obedience to patience and positive thinking. Dalton explores these uses of the story of Noah and more as he engages the fields of biblical studies, the history of religion in America, religious education, childhood studies, and children's literature.

Best Books