The Unifying Theme of Our Chaning Planet centers on the basic metabolism of the interactive and integrated ecosphere of planet Earth and how it has changed over time, how it has been influenced by the circulation of numerous natural substances flowing through its atmosphere, land, water, and sea, and how humankind has become a geologic force in the ecosphere. The book discusses various aspects of both natural and human-induced global environmental change, emphasizing the historical (geologic) perspective of processes and changes in the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere systems through time, and human influences on the systems. It demonstrates how population growth, affluence, resource consumption, and technology give rise to human activities that lead to the environmental problems of rampant deforestation and conversion of forests to urban, grazing, and farm lands with major effects on the environment and people; extensive modifications of terrestrial and aquatic systems and their degradation, including stresses on freshwater resources and cultural eutrophication; anthropogenic sulffur and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere that increase the acidity of rainfall and freshwater aquatic systems with damaging effects on the biota; photo-chemical smog, including formation and spread of tropospheric ozone and the health issues associated with smog; stratospheric ozone depletion and the "hole in the sky" and its effect on climate and the ultraviolet flux; and the currently most talk-about and debated issue of environmental change, that of the enhanced greenhouse effect and global warming with its effects on patterns of precipitation, soil moisture and crops, geographical distribution of vegetation and plants and animals, freshwater runoff, sea-level rise, photosynthesis and respiration on land and in the sea and the uptake of atmospheric CO2, circulation of the ocean, and ocean acidification. The book is a holistic treatment of both natural and human-induced change from the beginning of the Earth on into its future.
This text is a general interdisciplinary discussion of global environmental change oriented toward the non-specialist in science. Presented are both Earth Science and ecological concepts related to global change, as well as discussion of the human dimensions of change.
This concise textbook combines Earth and biological sciences to explore the co-evolution of the Earth and life over geological time.
Facts101 is your complete guide to Our Changing Planet, An Introduction to Earth System Science and Global Environmental Change. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
Global Climate Change and U.S. Law provides comprehensive coverage of the country's law as it relates to global climate change. After a summary of the factual and scientific background, Part I outlines the international and national legal framework of climate change regulation and associated litigation. Part II describes emerging regional, state and local actions, and includes a 50-state survey. Part III covers issues of concern to corporations, including disclosure, fiduciary duties, insurance, and subsidies. Part IV examines the legal aspects of efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, such as voluntary efforts, emissions trading, and carbon sequestration. Global Climate Change and U.S. Law includes key resource aids, including a glossary of climate related terms; a list of acronyms; extensive endnotes; and a comprehensive index.
A systems-based approach to physical geography written in an easy-to-understand narrative style that is closely integrated with clear, single-concept illustrations.
The Blue Planet: An Introduction to Earth System Sciences, 3rd Edition is an innovative text for the earth systems science course. It treats earth science from a systems perspective, now showing the five spheres and how they are interrelated. There are many photos and figures in the text to develop a strong understanding of the material presented. This along with the new media for instructors makes this a strong text for any earth systems science course.
Since its first publication more than twenty-five years ago, How to Build a Habitable Planet has established a legendary reputation as an accessible yet scientifically impeccable introduction to the origin and evolution of Earth, from the Big Bang through the rise of human civilization. This classic account of how our habitable planet was assembled from the stuff of stars introduced readers to planetary, Earth, and climate science by way of a fascinating narrative. Now this great book has been made even better. Harvard geochemist Charles Langmuir has worked closely with the original author, Wally Broecker, one of the world's leading Earth scientists, to revise and expand the book for a new generation of readers for whom active planetary stewardship is becoming imperative. Interweaving physics, astronomy, chemistry, geology, and biology, this sweeping account tells Earth’s complete story, from the synthesis of chemical elements in stars, to the formation of the Solar System, to the evolution of a habitable climate on Earth, to the origin of life and humankind. The book also addresses the search for other habitable worlds in the Milky Way and contemplates whether Earth will remain habitable as our influence on global climate grows. It concludes by considering the ways in which humankind can sustain Earth’s habitability and perhaps even participate in further planetary evolution. Like no other book, How to Build a Habitable Planet provides an understanding of Earth in its broadest context, as well as a greater appreciation of its possibly rare ability to sustain life over geologic time. Leading schools that have ordered, recommended for reading, or adopted this book for course use: Arizona State University Brooklyn College CUNY Columbia University Cornell University ETH Zurich Georgia Institute of Technology Harvard University Johns Hopkins University Luther College Northwestern University Ohio State University Oxford Brookes University Pan American University Rutgers University State University of New York at Binghamton Texas A&M University Trinity College Dublin University of Bristol University of California-Los Angeles University of Cambridge University Of Chicago University of Colorado at Boulder University of Glasgow University of Leicester University of Maine, Farmington University of Michigan University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of North Georgia University of Nottingham University of Oregon University of Oxford University of Portsmouth University of Southampton University of Ulster University of Victoria University of Wyoming Western Kentucky University Yale University
Originally published in 1986 as Basic meteorology: a physical outline.
This highly acclaimed atlas distills the vast science of climate change, providing a reliable and insightful guide to this rapidly growing field. Since the 2006 publication of the first edition, climate change has climbed even higher up the global agenda. This new edition reflects the latest developments in research and the impact of climate change, and in current efforts to mitigate and adapt to changes in the world’s weather. The atlas covers a wide range of topics, including warning signs, vulnerable populations, health impacts, renewable energy, emissions reduction, personal and public action. The third edition includes new or additional coverage of a number of topics, including agreements reached in Copenhagen and Cancun, ocean warming and increased acidity, the economic impact of climate change, and advantages gained by communities and business from adapting to climate change. The extensive maps and graphics have been updated with new data, making this edition once again an essential resource for everyone concerned with this pressing subject.
Explores the causes and implications of the Anthropocene, or Age of Humans, from multiple points of view including anthropological, scientific, social, artistic, and economic. Although we arrived only recently in Earth's timeline, humans are driving major changes to the planet's ecosystems. Even now, the basic requirements for human life--air, water, shelter, food, nature, and culture--are rapidly transforming the planet as billions of people compete for resources. These changes have become so noticeable on a global scale that scientists believe we are living in a new chapter in Earth's story: the Anthropocene, or Age of Humans. Living in the Anthropocene: Earth in the Age of Humans is a vital look at this era. The book contextualizes the Anthropocene by presenting paleontological, historical, and contemporary views of various human effects on Earth. It discusses environmental and biological systems that have been changed and affected; the causes of the Anthropocene, such as agricultural spread, pollution, and urbanization; how societies are responding and adapting to these changes; how these changes have been represented in art, film, television, and literature; and finally, offers a look toward the future of our environment and our own lives.
Never Highlight a Book Again! Just the FACTS101 study guides give the student the textbook outlines, highlights, practice quizzes and optional access to the full practice tests for their textbook.
For courses in Earth Systems Science offered in departments of Geology, Earth Science, Geography and Environmental Science. The first textbook of its kind that addresses the issues of global change from a true Earth systems perspective, The Earth System offers a solid emphasis on lessons from Earth's history that may guide decision-making in the future. It is more rigorous and quantitative than traditional Earth science books, while remaining appropriate for non-science majors.
From the oceans to continental heartlands, human activities have altered the physical characteristics of Earth's surface. With Earth's population projected to peak at 8 to 12 billion people by 2050 and the additional stress of climate change, it is more important than ever to understand how and where these changes are happening. Innovation in the geographical sciences has the potential to advance knowledge of place-based environmental change, sustainability, and the impacts of a rapidly changing economy and society. Understanding the Changing Planet outlines eleven strategic directions to focus research and leverage new technologies to harness the potential that the geographical sciences offer.
John Houghton explores the scientific basis of global warming and the likely impacts of climate change on human society, then addresses the question of what action might be taken by governments, industry, and by individuals to mitigate the effects.
Climate modeling and simulation teach us about past, present, and future conditions of life on earth and help us understand observations about the changing atmosphere and ocean and terrestrial ecology. Focusing on high-end modeling and simulation of earth's climate, Climate Modeling for Scientists and Engineers presents observations about the general circulations of the earth and the partial differential equations used to model the dynamics of weather and climate, covers numerical methods for geophysical flows in more detail than many other texts, discusses parallel algorithms and the role of high-performance computing used in the simulation of weather and climate, and provides over 100 pages of supplemental lectures and MATLAB? exercises on an associated Web page. This book is intended for graduate students in science and engineering. It is also useful for a broad spectrum of computational science and engineering researchers, especially those who want a brief introduction to the methods and capabilities of climate models and those who use climate model results in their investigations. Information on numerical methods used to solve the equations of motion and climate simulations using parallel algorithms on high-performance computers challenges researchers who aim to improve the prediction of climate on decadal to century time scales.
"Biogeochemistry considers how the basic chemical conditions of the Earth-from atmosphere to soil to seawater-have been and are being affected by the existence of life. Human activities in particular, from the rapid consumption of resources to the destruction of the rainforests and the expansion of smog-covered cities, are leading to rapid changes in the basic chemistry of the Earth. This expansive text pulls together the numerous fields of study encompassed by biogeochemistry to analyze the increasing demands of the growing human population on limited resources and the resulting changes in the planet's chemical makeup. The book helps students extrapolate small-scale examples to the global level, and also discusses the instrumentation being used by NASA and its role in studies of global change. With extensive cross-referencing of chapters, figures and tables, and an interdisciplinary coverage of the topic at hand, this updated edition provides an excellent framework for courses examining global change and environmental chemistry, and is also a useful self-study guide."--Publisher's website.
Climate Change Biology, 2e examines the evolving discipline of human-induced climate change and the resulting shifts in the distributions of species and the timing of biological events. The text focuses on understanding the impacts of human-induced climate change by drawing on multiple lines of evidence, including paleoecology, modeling, and current observation. This revised and updated second edition emphasizes impacts of human adaptation to climate change on nature and greater emphasis on natural processes and cycles and specific elements. With four new chapters, an increased emphasis on tools for critical thinking, and a new glossary and acronym appendix, Climate Change Biology, 2e is the ideal overview of this field. Expanded treatment of processes and cycles Additional exercises and elements to encourage independent and critical thinking Increased on-line supplements including mapping activities and suggested labs and classroom activities.
Interest in climate change has generated a mountain of literature leaving many floundering in the sheer flood of information, commentary, claims and initiatives. This highly accessible book assumes no prior knowledge and cuts through the confusion to explain the key economic and policy issues related to climate change in simple language and with only a few statistics. Coverage slices across the breadth and depth of climate change, providing short summaries of the most relevant research and conclusions from various disciplines. The authors highlight where economists and policy makers generally misunderstand the science of climate change, underestimate the risks of runaway warming and exaggerate the costs of radical measures to stabilize the climate. A key focus is the impact of climate change on world agriculture, the world's most important activity. The authors provide a critical examination of how current policies that promote poor water usage and soil erosion are risking a catastrophic collapse of agriculture in the poorest and most populous countries in a warming world. They look at the solutions such as how no-till, conservation farming, third generation biofuels from waste land, alternative energy, and bio-char production to raise sustainable yields, reduce emissions and sequester carbon in soil. The second, crucial thrust is a critical examination of the growth economy paradigm of rich countries that is driving climate change. The authors look at economic measures to control climate change including switching taxes from labour to carbon and subsidies from fossil and nuclear energy to renewable alternatives as well as demand management and energy saving. Overall the book provides a comprehensive, critical introduction to the issues and highlights the main policies that are needed to initiate the transformation to sustainability and avert the worst risks of climate catastrophe.

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