THE TRUTH Most Christians are acquainted with these patterns of behavior: relentless fault-finding, gossip, and the tendency to be easily offended. Out of the Courtroom exposes the root of these destructive patterns: idolatry. Every human lives as an idola counterfeit judge who presides over his or her own lifeuntil the coming of Jesus Christ and his enthronement on the judgment seat of the human heart. For a Christian, it cannot be surprising that this idolatry reigns in the world. But the hard truth is that destructive human judgment is easily observable in the life and witness of the Church and its membersa fundamental part of our disposition toward ourselves and others which robs us of much of our freedom in Jesus Christ and severely inhibits our formation into his likeness. THE CHALLENGE Anyone who desires to become a living witness to the Lordship of Jesus Christ and to know the freedom and power of life lived as a child of God must come to terms with this: unless Jesus is your only judge, he is not your only Lord. Out of the Courtroom, Into the Fathers House is a profound and vital teaching for the Church of Christ. This revelation of the far-reaching significance and true meaning of Jesus words do not judge illuminates a path of personal healing and liberation. Even more importantly, it opens a powerful way for the Church to live in the grace and truth of Jesus Christ whom she embodies. Dr. Linda Stalley, co-leader, the Maranatha Community, UK
It was another drive-by shooting in one of Kindle County's most drug-plagued housing projects – but the victim was the ex-wife of a politician. Now this explosive case is about to reunite an unlikely group of men and women who first bonded in the revolutionary fires of the 1960s . . . and show a once-crusading female judge, driven by both her fears and her courage, just how devastating a single wrong choice can be . . . 'Moving . . . compelling . . . wonderfully colourful' New York Times 'Turow is in a category of his own' San Francisco Chronicle
A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.
Hailed as a “clear-eyed book written with poetry and compassion” by The Boston Globe, Let the Tornado Come is the “lyrical debut memoir” (Kirkus Reviews) of a runaway child, the woman she became, and the horse that set her free. When Rita Zoey Chin was eleven years old, she began running away from home. Her parents’ violence and neglect drove her onto the streets in search of a better life, but what she found instead was a dangerous world of drugs and predatory men—as well as the occasional kindness of strangers. As she hits bottom and then learns to forge a new life for herself, all of her dreams of freedom and beauty pivot on a single, precious memory: a herd of horses running along a roadside fence. A few years later, Rita—now a prizewinning poet and wife of a successful neurosurgeon—appears to have triumphed over her harrowing childhood, until she is struck with a series of debilitating panic attacks that threaten her comfortable new life. Ultimately, it is the memory of those hoofbeats, and the chance arrival of a spirited, endearing horse named Claret who has a difficult history himself, that will finally save her. “A near euphoric ode to the human spirit” (Huffington Post), Let the Tornado Come is about pulling yourself up out of the dark and discovering that the greatest escape lies not in running from, but turning towards, those things that frighten you the most; it is “luminous…A haunting yet hopeful saga that shows how trauma and fear can transform themselves into enduring strength” (Publishers Weekly).
Beyond the River brings to brilliant life the dramatic story of the forgotten heroes of the Ripley, Ohio, line of the Underground Railroad. From the highest hill above the town of Ripley, Ohio, you can see five bends in the Ohio River. You can see the hills of northern Kentucky and the rooftops of Ripley’s riverfront houses. And you can see what the abolitionist John Rankin saw from his house at the top of that hill, where for nearly forty years he placed a lantern each night to guide fugitive slaves to freedom beyond the river. In Beyond the River, Ann Hagedorn tells the remarkable story of the participants in the Ripley line of the Underground Railroad, bringing to life the struggles of the men and women, black and white, who fought “the war before the war” along the Ohio River. Determined in their cause, Rankin, his family, and his fellow abolitionists—some of them former slaves themselves—risked their lives to guide thousands of runaways safely across the river into the free state of Ohio, even when a sensational trial in Kentucky threatened to expose the Ripley “conductors.” Rankin, the leader of the Ripley line and one of the early leaders of the antislavery movement, became nationally renowned after the publication of his Letters on American Slavery, a collection of letters he wrote to persuade his brother in Virginia to renounce slavery. A vivid narrative about memorable people, Beyond the River is an inspiring story of courage and heroism that transports us to another era and deepens our understanding of the great social movement known as the Underground Railroad.
An account of a trial that polarized a small city a mentally incompetent snitch who derailed a popular mayor defense attorneys and prosecutors who together supported a mythical murder with no grounding in evidence white power rallies that never happened and a local and national media that joined forces with an out of control prosecution and made a circus of the trial. This book is a close examination of the original testimony and evidence and the press role in the period between the convening of the grand jury and the end of the trials an examination that no one before has attempted. In an epilogue the author suggests ways to prevent such catastrophes from occurring.
Heavy Burdens with luggage shows us that we all have secrets, burdens that we pick up and carry around daily, which often leads to disastrous results. This fictional tale introduces us to individuals we recognize as family, and reminds us that love can keep us together. Meet Teresa Rosser, heavy burdened with her mother's antics of being a certified nut. Others weave in and out of this novel; which reminds us that it really takes a village to lead the way. Teresa learns the value of life, what truly makes her happy, how she revolves In a full circle; then enters Gerald, the most beautiful chocolate creature God ever created upon the face of this beautiful Earth.....God is good all the time. Enjoy.
From the bestselling author of WAR OF THE RATS comes a novel of searing intensity and uncompromising vision . . . The inhabitants of Good Hope, Virginia, haven't felt the cooling effects of rain in weeks. With the town a tinderbox waiting to explode, all it will take is a spark to ignite the rage and hatred so carefully hidden. And then a tragedy occurs. A baby is born and dies in her mother's arms. The child, Nora Carol, is buried quickly and quietly the next day in the churchyard. It should have ended there, but it didn't, for Nora Carol is of mixed race. The white deacons of Good Hope's Victory Baptist Church, trying to protect the centuries-old traditions of their cemetery, have the body exhumed. That night the church is set ablaze, and the sole witness is the only suspect - Elijah, Nora Carol's father. What follows is a legal case that reveals a host of hidden prejudices, incendiary secrets, and ultimately, an act of justice that has nothing to do with the law . . .
Kim Rich was an ordinary girl trapped in an extraordinary childhood, someone who dreamed of going to parties and getting good grades while living in an after‐hours hell of pimps and con men. Kim Rich longed for normalcy, yet she was inescapably her father's child, and she had no choice but to grow up fast. Her mother was a stripper and B‐girl: her father was a major player in the underworld of Anchorage, Alaska in the sixties, a city flush with newfound oil money. Only after her father was gruesomely murdered and Kim became a journalist was she able to fill in the missing pieces of one American dream gone horribly wrong. Kim's true story is a tale of a woman's search for her parent's secrets. What she finds is both shocking and tragic, but in the end she's able to discover her true self amid the remnants of her parents' lost lives.
Time To Lay By, is a collection of short stories, some humorous, some bizarre, but all true. For centuries storytellers were the only source of history. They told their tales, preserving history by handing their stories down from generation to generation. Without the storyteller, much of history would have been lost. Time To Lay By, recounts a way of life that was common in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Southeastern Kansas in the not too distant past. Once again, a part of history has been saved throught the words of the storyteller. There are stories of legal hangings, western men, moonshiners, bootlegging and many other topics too numerous to mention. These long ago stories are as they occurred back in days lost in the pages of time. They add to our knowledge of a fasciniating region and a way of life nearly forgotten. This book isn't just for the historians, but for anyone who is curious about the past or simply love a good book.
Vermeer, Goya, Rembrandt, Rubens - the Beit art collection was worth millions. For decades Sir Alfred and Lady Beit had lived peacefully at Russborough House in Ireland. Until people started stealing their paintings...Of all the canvases at Russborough, it was Vermeer's Lady Writing a Letter with her Maid that most caught the public's imagination. Twice stolen, once by an IRA sympathiser and then by notorious gangster Martin Cahill, it risked being lost from view forever, unless the Garda, together with Scotland Yard and some seasoned international art detectives, could contrive the perfect sting... Matthew Hart tells the riveting story of the theft and recovery of some of the world's most important art, finding new leads and unexpected connections in the mysterious underworld of international art crime.
From crime scene to morgue to courtroom, and finally the court of public opinion, this riveting narrative is essential reading for true-crime enthusiasts. If you think the media has told you everything there is to know about Michael Jackson and Casey Anthony, think again! This engrossing, almost cinematic page-turner, offers never-before-published information on the mysterious deaths of Michael Jackson and Caylee Anthony, plus five other ripped-from-the-headlines criminal cases. Based on the authors' long investigative experience, these two insiders offer revealing insights into the following high-profile cases: -Casey Anthony: An assessment of the Trial of this Century, during which a Florida mother stood accused of killing her young daughter, Caylee. At stake were issues that included accuracy of air sampling and cadaver dogs, post-mortem hair banding, chloroform, duct tape identification, computer clues, and deep family secrets. -Michael Jackson: The authors provide never-disclosed data on the autopsies of Jackson’s body and a microscopic view of the singer’s life and career, plus analysis of the cardiologist charged with his death: Was Dr. Conrad Murphy recklessly negligent or a fall guy for a hopelessly addicted celebrity? -Drew Peterson: Heroic Illinois SWAT team cop or wife killer? Did his third wife slip and fall in the bathtub, or was she beaten and drowned? The controversy over her death led to an exhumation and the filing of homicide charges against him, but can prosecutors prove their case? And what happened to his fourth wife, who remains missing? -Rolling Stone Brian Jones: Was the rock musician’s death an accident or something more sinister? And was he impaired by drugs or alcohol when he died? After more than forty years, there is finally an answer. In addition, the authors examine the tragic death of twelve-year-old Gabrielle Bechen, whose rape-murder changed her community; Col. Philip Shue, whose demise was a battle of suicide versus homicide until Dr. Wecht solved the case; and Carol Ann Gotbaum, a respected Manhattan mother who died in police custody in Phoenix. From the Hardcover edition.
Grant McRae has a loving wife, a healthy son, and a new career with the local police department. Bert Commerford has a pretty good life too, as the proud owner of Commerford & Sons Auto Service. But Bert's sons are polar opposites: Travis is a budding junior hockey star, and Russell is a thug loaded with resentment for Bert. When tragedy befalls the Commerfords, Bert finds himself too haunted by his murky past to stop his life from buckling. Russell leaves home and almost immediately finds disaster as his path intersects with Constable McRae's. Told from alternating perspectives, The Next Rainy Day is a fast-moving exploration of loss and of finding hope in the wake of personal disaster.
On August 27, 1956 in Clinton, Tennessee, twelve African American students made history when they were the first to walk through the doors of a legally desegregated high school. On that day, integration in the South formally moved from the courtroom to the classroom. Author Doug Davis was a frontline witness to history. His mother was an English teacher at the high school, and his father was a lawyer in the initial court case. Although school opened with minimal disruption, the first week ended with tanks rolling into town to keep order. Later, when the parents of the black students were reluctant to send their children to school, the author’s father was one of three who escorted the students through a gauntlet of angry racists that had gathered in protest. Davis was just eight when this happened, and the memories of those tense days were the inspiration for this story. The conflict followed the family home and included the burning of a cross in their front yard. The family members were eyewitnesses to their hometown’s turmoil, conflict that escalated from riots and protests, culminating in the destruction of the high school with one hundred sticks of dynamite. Th e people of this ruptured community bore the brunt of this momentous era of societal change in America. Here, childhood memories of family and community shed their light on the story.
September 25, 1985. The worst storm in half a century is headed towards the United States, her point of landfall--Fire Island, a narrow sandbar hugging the shore of Long Island. The East Coast is evacuated for hundreds of miles north and south, but on Fire Island itself, ten people refuse to eave. In Dark Wind, a remarkable work of nonfiction, John Jiler tells the story of those people. A gay man with AIDS stayed behind because he had nothing left to lose. One pair of fiends tried to endure the storm with deep, meditative prayer; another trio, with a wild, chattering cocktail party. Also on the island lay the Sunken Forest, an ancient woods teeming with birds, plant, and animal life that was no less profoundly threatened by the power of Hurricane Gloria. In this literary tour de force, Jiler combines the results of in-depth interviews with the survivors and detailed knowledge of the unique social and natural history of Fire Island to produce a panoramic account of nature in its inexplicable, sublime fury.
The one hundred letters brought together for this book illustrate the range of Hugh Trevor-Roper's life and preoccupations: as an historian, a controversialist, a public intellectual, an adept in academic intrigues, a lover of literature, a traveller, a countryman. They depict a life of rich diversity; a mind of intellectual sparkle and eager curiosity; a character that relished the comédie humaine, and the absurdities, crotchets, and vanities of his contemporaries. The playful irony of Trevor-Roper's correspondence places him in a literary tradition stretching back to such great letter-writers as Madame de Sévigné and Horace Walpole. Though he generally shunned emotional self-exposure in correspondence as in company, his letters to the woman who became his wife reveal the surprising intensity and the raw depths of his feelings. Trevor-Roper was one of the most gifted scholars of his generation, and one of the most famous dons of his day. While still a young man, he made his name with his bestseller The Last Days of Hitler, and became notorious for his acerbic assaults on other historians. In his prime, Trevor-Roper appeared to have everything: a grey Bentley, a prestigious chair in Oxford, a beautiful country house, a wife with a title, and, eventually, a title of his own. But he failed to write the 'big book' expected of him, and tainted his reputation when in old age he erroneously authenticated the forged Hitler diaries. For an academic, Trevor-Roper's interests were extraordinarily wide, bringing him into contact with such diverse individuals as George Orwell and Margaret Thatcher, Albert Speer and Kim Philby, Katharine Hepburn and Rupert Murdoch. The tragicomedy of his tenure as Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge, provided an appropriate finale to a career packed with incident. Trevor-Roper's letters to Bernard Berenson, published as Letters from Oxford in 2006, gave pleasure to a wide variety of readers. This more general selection of his correspondence has been long anticipated, and will delight anyone who values wit, erudition, and clear prose.
A parent's greatest wish is to love and raise their children. When my daughter, Danielle, was born, I easily could have been the happiest man in the world. At that time, I never could have imagined that she would one day be ripped out of my life and legally kept away from me. For years, I went up against a biased and dysfunctional legal system, Family Court, which claims to have "the best interest of the children" in mind, yet has no consideration for fathers. My simple response to the flawed system's claim is that it takes two parents to serve the "best interest of the children". This story is about my fight for compassion and justice. It's about the startling and damaging effects of "Parent Alienation" on both me and my daughter. Ultimately, this book is a testament of my love for my beautiful little girl, Danielle, with whom I often daydream of meeting again.
ALTDORF: The Forest Knights: Book 1 A druid priestess enlists the help of an ex-Hospitaller warrior and a charismatic outlaw to fight Austrian tyranny in medieval Switzerland. A subtle blend of fantasy and history, Altdorf tells the events leading up to one of the greatest underdog stories of the medieval age, the Battle of Morgarten. “Re-imagining the William Tell legend—without William Tell.” At the end of the thirteenth century, five hundred orphans and second sons are rounded up from villages in the Alpine countryside and sold to the Hospitaller Knights of St John. Trained to serve as Soldiers of Christ, they fight in eastern lands they know nothing about, for a cause they do not understand. Thomas Schwyzer, released from his vows by the Grandmaster of the Hospitallers, returns to the land of his birth a stranger. Once a leader of men, and captain of the Order’s most famous war galley, he now settles into the simple life of a ferryman. He believes this new role to be God’s reward for years of faithful service fighting the Infidel in Outremer. Seraina, considered a witch by most, a healer by some, is a young woman with a purpose. A Priestess of the Old Religion, and the last Druid disciple of the Helvetii Celts, she has been gifted by the Great Weave to see what others cannot. Her people need her guidance and protection now more than ever. For Duke Leopold of Habsburg, in his efforts to control the St. Gotthard Pass, builds a great Austrian fortress in Altdorf. Once finished, the Habsburg occupation will be complete, but the atrocities visited upon her people will have just begun. Set in medieval Switzerland, ALTDORF is the first book in a two-book series. historical, medieval, knights, druids, free, freebie, bernard cornwell, simon scarrow, war, military, robin hood, free action, free adventure, roman, viking
Hope Springs Will Travers is back in town! Will Travers left Hope Springs ten years ago, accused of a crime he didn't commit. He tried to make a life for himself and his young wife far, far away. But his wife wanted more, and left him for greener pastures. Now he's raising his son on his own, and he realizes there's no better place to do that than Hope Springs. Even if it means facing Libby Jeffries again. Especially if it means facing Libby Jeffries. She was the only "witness" to his alleged crime. But Libby is not at all pleased to see him. Particularly when a series of "accidents" beings to occur. But this time Will needs her on his side. She's the only person who can help him make enough sense of the past to allow him to give his son a future. And, ironically, that future now includes Libby.
Monica Dickens's novel, first published in 1965, opens in a Juvenile court in London. One of the young offenders is a sixteen-year-old girl, Kate, who is described as being in need of care and protection. In the court is a girl only slightly older, Emma, daughter of the magistrate. From her experience of going around with a social worker on his calls she knows that adolescents and, more important, small children are daily subjected to neglect and brutality and that "care and protection" cannot be prescribed like National Health aspirin. She meets Kate again, by chance, in her Uncle's supermarket where she is learning the business from the bottom up. And between these two girls, from different backgrounds, with very different parents who have different personal problems, there springs up a friendship which is deep and, for a while at any rate, beyond misunderstanding. Each girl has her way to make in life, each has her love, hate, despair and hope, each the complications of parental control sapped by the inner knowledge of marriages that no longer work.

Best Books