A moving tribute to the physical and spiritual properties of nature's richestelement by one of the world's leading soil conservationists.
Combining his scientific work as an ecologist with a life-long study of the Bible, Daniel Hillel offers fresh perspectives on biblical views of the environment and the origin of ethical monotheism.
This book analyzes and elucidates the nature of predictable changes on the world's agricultural system caused by the so-called greenhouse effect. Its aim is to educate students at the undergraduate level about how the climatic factors affecting agriculture may be modified in the future, andwhat practical adaptations might be undertaken to prevent or overcome any possible adverse impacts on our ability to feed the world's population. The book draws on several complimentary disciplines, including atmospheric science, hydrology, soil science, crop physiology, and resource economics, andintegrates the relevant aspects of these fields.
Dirt, soil, call it what you want—it's everywhere we go. It is the root of our existence, supporting our feet, our farms, our cities. This fascinating yet disquieting book finds, however, that we are running out of dirt, and it's no laughing matter. An engaging natural and cultural history of soil that sweeps from ancient civilizations to modern times, Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations explores the compelling idea that we are—and have long been—using up Earth's soil. Once bare of protective vegetation and exposed to wind and rain, cultivated soils erode bit by bit, slowly enough to be ignored in a single lifetime but fast enough over centuries to limit the lifespan of civilizations. A rich mix of history, archaeology and geology, Dirt traces the role of soil use and abuse in the history of Mesopotamia, Ancient Greece, the Roman Empire, China, European colonialism, Central America, and the American push westward. We see how soil has shaped us and we have shaped soil—as society after society has risen, prospered, and plowed through a natural endowment of fertile dirt. David R. Montgomery sees in the recent rise of organic and no-till farming the hope for a new agricultural revolution that might help us avoid the fate of previous civilizations.
Soil in the Environment is key for every course in soil science, earth science, and environmental disciplines. This textbook engages students to critically look at soil as the central link in the function and creation of the terrestrial environment. For the first time, Dr. Hillel brilliantly discusses soils as a natural body that is engaged in dynamic interaction with the atmosphere above and the strata below that influences the planet's climate and hydrological cycle, and serves as the primary habitat for a versatile community of living organisms. The book offers a larger perspective of soil’s impact on the environment by organizing chapters among three main processes: Physical, Chemical, and Biology. It is organized in a student-friendly format with examples, discussion boxes, and key definitions in every chapter. The book provides students of geology, physical science, and environmental studies with fundamental information and tools for meeting the natural resource challenges of the 21st century, while providing students of soil science and ecology with the understanding of physical and biological interactions necessary for sustainability. First textbook to unite soil science and the environment beyond what is traditionally taught Incorporates current knowledge of such hot topics as climate change, pollution control, human expropriation of natural resources, and the prospects for harmonious and sustainable development Organized in a student-friendly format with examples, discussion boxes, and key definitions in every chapter Full color throughout
A call to agricultural revolution from a locavore and author who is one of “the most prominent and effective advocates of American environmental thought” (Prairie Fire Newspaper). For years, Wes Jackson has made it his mission to raise Americans’ awareness about where their food comes from. Focusing on locally grown and produced food, the locavore movement—joined by food experts and enthusiasts including Alice Waters, Michael Pollan, and Barbara Kingsolver—strives to return agriculture to a more community-based endeavor. This would not only improve the quality of the meals we eat, but protect the land from agricultural processes we’ve grown too dependent on. In this volume, ranging in topic from the history of the earth to the use of modern chemicals and pesticides to the effects of global warming, Jackson outlines a plan that highlights natural ecosystems in the future of farming and food production. An eloquent manifesto for our age, Jackson’s analysis explores the way our agricultural methods have affected everything from the soil to the health of the US population to the danger of monoculture grains. Join the author in a look at how we can change not only the food we eat, but the future of our land.
Soil degradation is real and global, even if the evidence is not so easy to glean. Degradation poses comparable risks to greenhouse gas emissions, deforestation, and nonhuman animal extinctions. Few have noticed soil degradation as the problem it has become, except most indigenous peoples in their struggles for survival.
In this extensively revised and enlarged edition of his best-selling book, David Suzuki reflects on the increasingly radical changes in nature and science — from global warming to the science behind mother/baby interactions — and examines what they mean for humankind’s place in the world. The book begins by presenting the concept of people as creatures of the Earth who depend on its gifts of air, water, soil, and sun energy. The author explains how people are genetically programmed to crave the company of other species, and how people suffer enormously when they fail to live in harmony with them. Suzuki analyzes those deep spiritual needs, rooted in nature, that are a crucial component of a loving world. Drawing on his own experiences and those of others who have put their beliefs into action, The Sacred Balance is a powerful, passionate book with concrete suggestions for creating an ecologically sustainable, satisfying, and fair future by rediscovering and addressing humanity’s basic needs.
Extend the human story backward for the five thousand years of recorded history and it covers no more than a millionth of a lifetime of the Earth. Yet how do we humans take stock of the history of our planet, and our own place within it? A “vast historical mosaic” (Publishers Weekly) rendered engaging and accessible, Big History interweaves different disciplines of knowledge to offer an all-encompassing account of history on Earth. Since its publication, Cynthia Brown’s “world history on a grand scale” (Kirkus) has been translated into nine languages and has helped propel the “big history” concept to viral status. This new edition of Brown’s seminal work is more relevant today than ever before, as we increasingly must grapple with accelerating rates of change and, ultimately, the legacy we will bequeath to future generations. Here is a pathbreaking portrait of our world, from the birth of the universe from a single point the size of an atom to life on a twenty-first-century planet inhabited by 7 billion people.
This is a fully revised and expanded second edition of Malcolm Newson's acclaimed book. Exploring in greater depth the meaning of sustainability in river basin development this new edition: * highlights the rapid evolution of practical concepts since the Rio Earth Summit * features new illustrations and case studies from Australia, South Africa and Israel * makes the ecosystem model more explicit throughout * strengthens coverage of the linkages between land and water management.
Soil contamination...public lands...surface and groundwater pollution...coastal erosion...global warming. Have we reached the limits of this planet's ability to provide for us? If so, what can we do about it? These vital questions are addressed by Jill Schneiderman in The Earth Around Us, a unique collection of thirty-one essays by a diverse array of today's foremost scientist-writers. Sharing an ability to communicate science in a clear and engaging fashion, the contributors explore Earth's history and processes--especially in relation to today's environmental issues--and show how we, as members of a global community, can help maintain a livable planet. The narratives in this collection are organized into seven parts that describe: - Earth's time and history and the place of people in it - Views of nature and the ethics behind our conduct on Earth - Resources for the twenty-first century, such as public lands, healthy forests and soils, clean ground and surface waters, and fluctuating coastlines - Ill-informed local manipulations of landscapes across the United States - Innovative solutions to environmental problems that arise from knowledge of the interactions between living things and the Earth's air, water, and soil - Natural and human-induced global scale perturbations to the earth system - Our responsibility to people and all other organisms that live on Earth Never before has such a widely experienced group of prominent earth scientists been brought together to help readers understand how earth systems function to produce our physical and biological environment. Driven by the belief that earth science is, and should be, an integral part of everyday life, The Earth Around Us empowers all of us to play a more educated and active part in the search for a sustainable future for people and other living things on our planet.
In a single volume, Bringing Systems Thinking to Life: Expanding the Horizons for Bowen Family Systems Theory presents the extraordinary diversity and breadth of Bowen theory applications that address human functioning in various relationship systems across a broad spectrum of professions, disciplines, cultures, and nations. Providing three chapters of never-before-published material by Dr. Bowen, the book also demonstrates the transcendent nature and versatility of Bowen theory-based social assessment and its extension into fields of study and practice far beyond the original psychiatric context in which it was first formulated including social work, psychology, nursing, education, literary studies, pastoral care and counseling, sociology, business and management, leadership studies, distance learning, ecological science, and evolutionary biology. Providing ample evidence that Bowen theory has joined that elite class of theories that have enjoyed broad application to social phenomena while lending credibility to the claim that Bowen theory is one of the previous and current centuries’ most significant social-behavioral theories. More than a “resource manual” for Bowen theory enthusiasts, this book helps put a new great theory on the intellectual landscape.
How will patterns of human interaction with the earth's eco-system impact on biodiversity loss over the long term--not in the next ten or even fifty years, but on the vast temporal scale be dealt with by earth scientists? This volume brings together data from population biology, community ecology, comparative biology, and paleontology to answer this question.
With the global population projected to reach 9 billion by theyear 2050, the need for nations to secure food supplies for theirpopulations has never been more pressing. Finding better supplychain solutions is an essential part of achieving a secure andsustainable diet for a rapidly increasing population. We are now ina position, through methods including life cycle assessment (LCA),carbon footprinting and other tools, to accurately measure andassess our use – or misuse – of natural resources,including food. The impact of new technologies and managementsystems can therefore improve efficiencies and find new ways toreduce waste. Global Food Security and Supply provides robust, succinctinformation for people who want to understand how the global foodsystem works. The book demonstrates the specific tools availablefor understanding how food supply works, addresses the challengesfacing a secure and safe global food supply, and helps readers toappreciate how these challenges might be overcome. This book is a concise and accessible text that focuses onrecent data and findings from a range of internationalcollaborations and studies. The author provides both asnapshot of global food supply and security today, and a projectionof where these issues may lead us in the future. This book willtherefore be of particular interest to food policy leaders,commercial managers in the food industry, and researchers andstudents seeking a better understanding of a rapidly evolvingtopic.
Naomi W. Zaslow arrived in Philadelphia from Canada as a toddler in the depths of the Depression. Her acting talents led to professional performances on stage and radio, and school life led to her love of writing. Hitler and World War II brought the sad loss of her brother. A loving marriage, the innocence and simplicity of life in the 40's; 3 sons and a daughter and attaining the American Dream in the 50's; the changes in the 60's; work as a newspaper reporter and columnist and public relations; the honors and success of her cable soap opera "General High School", the loss of loving parents are movingly conveyed. The vicissitudes of business life, health problems, and family issues resolved and unresolved are candidly explored. The flourishing family that grows and succeeds are added wonders reflecting a joy and an appreciation of life that are contagious.
Optimizing the Soil Physical Environment Toward Greater Crop Yields contains the proceedings of an invitational panel convened during the International Symposium on Soil-Water Physics and Technology held at The Hebrew University Faculty of Agriculture in Rehovot, Israel, August 29 to September 5, 1971. Organized into 13 chapters, this book begins with a discussion on the criteria for determining the aims and direction of research in soil physics and technology. Some chapters deal with the transformation and fluxes of energy and matter in the field, particularly water, soil temperature, soil structure, soil salinity, radiation climate, and nutrient supply and uptake. The book also explores the methods of measuring, managing, and modifying the crop production system to greater agricultural advantage. This book will reflect not only what is known, but also what is missing in the incomplete conception of this environment.
Recounts the author's experiences founding a faith-based community garden in rural North Carolina, and emphasizes how growing one's own food can help readers reconnect with the land and divine faith.
The Story of Civilization, Volume II: A history of Greek civilization from the beginnings, and of civilization in the Near East from the Death of Alexander to the Roman Conquest. This is the second volume of the classic Pulitzer Prize-winning series.

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