Men and women not only have naturally different communication styles, but unique approaches to parenting as well. While mothers tend to overprotect their kids, fathers tend to push them toward independence. And whereas many experts tend to advocate “a united front,” Drs. Kyle and Marsha Pruett reveal how Mom and Dad not always being on exactly the same page— which, initially, may seem to cause conflict— can actually strengthen the whole family. Informed by the Pruetts' research and extensive experience with parents and children, Partnership Parenting offers a new outlook. In addition to fascinating biological insights, the book features strategies for negotiating common “landmine situations” from birth to age eight, from discipline and bedtime to helping kids with homework and teaching them responsibility. With wisdom and humor, Partnership Parenting helps couples take advantage of their individual strengths to raise confident children while simultaneously improving their marriage.
Based on the research that brought international recognition to Raine Eisler's groundbreaking work The Chalice and the Blade but addressing the world as it is today, The Power of Partnership offers inspiration and guidance for moving to the better lives we yearn for. Eisler offers us a new lens, a new paradigm, for seeing the world and living in it. The Partnership Model, which emphasizes mutual respect and a fundamental awareness of the sacredness of all life, creates a solid foundation for families, businesses, communities, and the world. In contrast, the suffocating paradigm that has guided much of recorded history — what Eisler calls the Domination Model — has led individuals and groups, acting out of fear, to oppress women, wage war, terrorize, and subjugate others. Using these simple yet far-reaching models, Eisler shows how political and personal relationships based on domination inevitably result in misery and violence, while those founded on partnership foster respect, love, and an explosion of creativity.
This volume tackles key issues in the changing nature of familylife from a global perspective, and is essential reading for thosestudying and working with families. Covers changes in couple relationships and the challenges thesepose; parenting practices and their implications for childdevelopment; key contemporary global issues, such as migration,poverty, and the internet, and their impact on the family; and therole of the state in supporting family relationships Includes a stellar cast of international contributors such asPaul Amato and John Coleman, and contributions from leading expertsbased in North Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand Discusses topics such as cohabitation, divorce, single-parenthouseholds, same-sex partnerships, fertility, and domesticviolence Links research and practice and provides policy recommendationsat the end of each chapter
The essays in this collection deploy biological and social scientific perspectives to evaluate the transformative experience of parenthood for today's women and men. They map the similar and distinct roles mothers and fathers play in their children's lives and measure the effect of gendered parenting on child well-being, work and family arrangements, and the quality of couples' relationships. Contributors describe what happens to brains and bodies when women become mothers and men become fathers; whether the stakes are the same or different for each sex; why, across history and cultures, women are typically more involved in childcare than men; why some fathers are strongly present in their children's lives while others are not; and how the various commitments men and women make to parenting shape their approaches to paid work and romantic relationships. Considering recent changes in men's and women's familial duties, the growing number of single-parent families, and the impassioned tenor of same-sex marriage debates, this book adds sound scientific and theoretical insight to these issues, constituting a standout resource for those interested in the causes and consequences of contemporary gendered parenthood.
With contributions from more than two hundred women, this candid, funny, and ultimately soft-hearted take on the feminine covers politics, pop culture, body image, sports, family life, the environment, and much, much more. Original.
For the 200,000 readers of The Chalice and the Blade, here are inspiring and pragmatic stories from influential, creative people on how they use Eisler's partnership principles to shape a better world. Executives, scientists, entrepreneurs and others give voice to the ways they apply balance and partnership in their work and lives.
This accessible guide to child development is written specifically for students of degrees and foundation degrees in Early Years, Early Childhood Studies and related disciplines and for early years practitioners. It introduces the context of child development, how we can develop an understanding of this development and how early years practitioners can support this in practice. It considers the biological/social debate, explores holistic development, examines factors affecting development and includes a chapter on reflective practice. This second edition has been updated to include new guidance for the revised Early Years Foundation Stage. It covers the development check at age two and looks in detail at how a learning of child development relates to early years practice. This edition also includes a new chapter introducing a critique of developmentalism. Throughout, new case studies have been included and interactive activites have been enhanced. About the Early Years series This series has been designed to support students of degrees and foundation degrees in Early Years, Early Childhood and related disciplines. Each text takes a focused look at a specific topic and approaches it in an accessible and user-friendly way. Learning features help readers engage with the text and understanding the subject from a number of different viewpoints. Activities pose questions to prompt thought and discussion and further reading suggestions, including useful websites, are included to help students access extended learning in each topic. Other titles in the series include Early Childhood Studies, Childhood and Society for the Early Years and Exploring Play for Early Childhood Studies. Sally Neaum is a lecturer in Early Childhood, and teaches primary English in initial teacher training. She ahs worked a s a nursery and primary school teacher and as an advisor in early years and inclusion. She has an M.Ed in Educational Psychology and Special Educational Needs and her doctoral research was in the pedagogy of early literacy.
This book provides a "work-in-progress" that seeks to capture the micro (direct service) and macro (managerial) perspectives related to identifying evidence for practice within the practice domain of public child welfare. It is divided into two categories; namely, evidence for direct practice and evidence for management practice. In Part I, the articles are categorized in the areas of child welfare assessment and child welfare outcomes. Expanded versions of the chapters can be accessed at www.bassc.net. In Part II, the focus is on organizational issues that relate to evidence for management practice. This section includes an overview of evidence-based practice from an organizational perspective along with evidence related to the experiences of others in implementing evidence-based practice. This book pushes the discussion of evidence-based practice in several new directions regarding: 1) the use of structured reviews to complement the systematic reviews of the Cochrane and Campbell Collaboratives, 2) the process of viewing the call for evidence-based practice as a goal or future vision of practice and evidence for practice provides a more immediate approach to promote evidence-informed practice, and 3) a recognition that evidence-informed practice is part of building agency-based knowledge sharing systems that involve the tacit and explicit knowledge needed to improve the outcomes of social services. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal Of Evidence-Based Social Work.
Historically, there has been little integration of theoretical or applied research on addiction treatment and parenting intervention development. Rather, the fields of addiction and developmental research have progressed on largely separate trajectories, even though their focus powerfully and often tragically intersects each time a parent is diagnosed with a substance use disorder. Parenting and Substance Abuse is the first book to report on pioneering efforts to move the treatment of substance-abusing parents forward by embracing their roles and experiences as mothers and fathers directly and continually across the course of treatment. The chapters in this volume represent important new strides among researchers and clinicians to address and close the increasingly recognizable gap between addiction and developmental science. Chapters focus on current, state-of-the-art treatment models for parents, primarily pregnant and parenting women, including descriptions of innovative treatments currently being developed and evaluated that focus on parental addiction and the parent-child relationship within a developmental framework. Part I covers the theoretical understandings of how addiction impacts the developmental processes of parenting. Part II discusses risk assessment, evaluation, and a variety of interventions and therapies. This unique volume will be of importance to clinicians, researchers, students, and trainees in the health professions who develop, implement, and evaluate interventions for parental addiction, including in well-baby clinics, primary care settings, pediatric clinics, and residential and outpatient drug treatment programs.
Fully revised and restructured, this fresh edition offers students and trainee social workers an incisive and authoritative introduction to the subject. As well as entirely new sections on theory and practice, the expert contributions which have shaped the companion’s leading reputation have been updated and now include innovative standalone essays on social work theory. Comprehensively reworked new edition comprising six substantive sections covering essential topics for trainee social workers – in effect, six books in one Includes an extensive introduction and chapters by leading experts on the focus and purpose of social work Provides a unified textbook for trainees and an invaluable professional reference volume Features a wealth of new material on theory and practice alongside detailed expositions of the social and psychological framework, stages in the human life cycle, and the objectives and core components of social work Each chapter lists five key points to remember, questions for discussion, and recommendations for further reading
The Unborn Child is essential reading for parents, potential parents and grandparents, as well as professionals with responsibility for children, and bringing babies into the world. This book describes prenatal and perinatal development, considering the legacy of health from both parents and grandparents. It explores the effects of the mother's mental and physical state during pregnancy, on the physiology and psychology of her expected child. The earlier in a child's development, beginning paradoxically before conception, that the wisdom of experience and science is applied, the greater the chances of a child's mental and physical health for life. Understanding these issues offers a way of healing early problems that contribute to such disorders as depression or compulsive behaviour. Here are invaluable guidelines towards generating children with their full genetic potential for basic health and emotional stability. This fascinating book is rooted in the experience of both authors, complete with authoritative case studies and scientific references. It has been extensively updated and restructured by Simon House, who has added entirely new material on nutrition from before conception.
This book offers a ground-breaking analysis of how women's movements have been remaking citizenship in multicultural Europe. Presenting the findings of a large scale, multi-disciplinary cross-national feminist research project, FEMCIT, it develops an expanded, multi-dimensional understanding of citizenship as practice and experience.
Proven ways to create a more loving family Research proves that happy families are good for health, longevity, peace of mind, productivity, and success. In The Secrets of Happy Families, Scott Haltzman offers an original approach to building family contentment that works for families of all ethnicities and make-ups–two-parent, single-parent, blended, childless, or same-sex couple. He provides a "positive psychology" way of solving family problems through strategy and leadership, including knowing and accepting who you are, taking a leadership role in loving and united relationships, building a network of support in extended families and communities, and making quality time for fun, adventures, holidays, and rituals.
Es ist die Geschichte einer Liebe: Maggie Nelson verliebt sich in Harry Dodge, einen Künstler – oder eine Künstlerin? – mit fluider Genderidentität. Harry hat bereits ein Kind, Maggie wird schwanger, zu viert bauen sie ein gemeinsames Leben. "Die Argonauten" ist eine ergreifende Geschichte queeren Familienlebens, zugleich erfindet Maggie Nelson eine ganz eigene Form der philosophischen Erkundung. Memoir, Theorie, Poesie: Es ist ein Buch, das sich nicht einordnen lässt und das unsere Einordnungen herausfordert mit seinem radikal offenen Denken. Im Geiste von Susan Sontag und Roland Barthes verbindet Maggie Nelson theoretische und persönliche Erkenntnissuche, um zu einer neuen Erzählung des Wesens von Liebe und Familie zu gelangen.
Shortlisted for the NASEN/TES 2007 Book Award Increased partnership between professionals, particularly through the integration of services, indicates a major opportunity for child and parent participation, but one that seems in danger of being side-stepped. Drawing on substantial research evidence, this book looks at reasons for this situation; what is happening now, what developments and initiatives have been tried and what can be done to develop a culture of participation? Some of the main threats to participation are discussed in this book including: Has ‘partnership’ ever been? Who is excluded from 'partnership'? Which discourses have made participation illusive and what are the implications – theoretical and practical - for how we move forward? Partnerships for Inclusive Education includes a helpful framework map which guides critical thinking towards the development of a culture of collaboration and presents original and stimulating ideas to open up the complex processes that can frustrate participative practice. Combining socio-cultural ideas with post-structural thinking gives this book a strong yet accessible theoretical basis, making it a valuable resource to both an academic and a professional educational audience.
From stay-at-home dads to the "mommy wars", Daddy On Board looks at just how far we have come from the late sixties and which parenting role issues still linger in the twenty-first century. Sharing personal insights and anecdotes from interviews with parents and professional counselors, Dottie Lamm, a mother and grandmother, offers a fascinating study of modern couples and the societal pressures the continue to face. Upbeat and insightful, Daddy On Board will appeal to anyone negotiating the waters of partnership parenting.
A successful co-parenting relationship is as vital to your child's well-being and health as nutritious food or proper exercise. Research, anecdotal evidence, and plain common sense all point to the fact that children are happier, healthier, and better adjusted when both of their parents play an active role in their lives. Studies also show that the trauma children experience in the wake of a divorce or separation can be lessened when they see their parents getting along. Kids whose parents successfully co-parent feel more secure than those who have limited or no connection to one of their parents post divorce. Co-Parenting 101 is based on the premise that co-parenting is a must, not an option. The involvement of both parents—not just the primary guardian—is the cornerstone of successful co-parenting. This is the first book written by a formerly married couple for whom co parenting is central to their day to day lives, and it offers a comprehensive, personal, and upfront look at how to effectively raise kids with an ex-spouse. Authors Deesha Philyaw and Michael D. Thomas, the creators of the popular co-parenting website, co-parenting101.org, share their own experiences raising their children together, as well as provide professional advice from co-parenting experts. Through practical tips combined with expert parental strategies, this book a great resource for divorced parents with children. For parents, less time stressed out about legal wrangling means more time to be fully present and engaged with the children. By learning to put their animosity aside, parents can focus on putting their kids first.
Completely revised and expanded from four to five volumes, this new edition of the Handbook of Parenting appears at a time that is momentous in the history of parenting. Parenting and the family are today in a greater state of flux, question, and redefinition than perhaps ever before. We are witnessing the emergence of striking permutations on the theme of parenting: blended families, lesbian and gay parents, and teen versus fifties first-time moms and dads. One cannot but be awed on the biological front by technology that now not only renders postmenopausal women capable of childbearing, but also presents us with the possibility of designing babies. Similarly on the sociological front, single parenthood is a modern day fact of life, adult child dependency is on the rise, and parents are ever less certain of their own roles, even in the face of rising environmental and institutional demands that they take increasing responsibility for their offspring. The Handbook of Parenting concerns itself with: *different types of parents--mothers and fathers, single, adolescent, and adoptive parents; *basic characteristics of parenting--behaviors, knowledge, beliefs, and expectations about parenting; *forces that shape parenting--evolution, genetics, biology, employment, social class, culture, environment, and history; *problems faced by parents--handicap, marital difficulties, drug addiction; and *practical concerns of parenting--how to promote children's health, foster social adjustment and cognitive competence, and interact with school, legal, and public officials. Contributors to the Handbook of Parenting have worked in different ways toward understanding all these diverse aspects of parenting, and all look to the most recent research and thinking in the field to shed light on many topics every parent wonders about. Each chapter addresses a different but central topic in parenting; each is rooted in current thinking and theory, as well as classical and modern research in that topic; each has been written to be read and absorbed in a single sitting. In addition, each chapter follows a standard organization, including an introduction to the chapter as a whole, followed by historical considerations of the topic, a discussion of central issues and theory, a review of classical and modern research, forecasts of future directions of theory and research, and a set of conclusions. Of course, contributors' own convictions and research are considered, but contributions to this new edition present all major points of view and central lines of inquiry and interpret them broadly. The Handbook of Parenting is intended to be both comprehensive and state of the art. As the expanded scope of this second edition amply shows, parenting is naturally and closely allied with many other fields.

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