Men and women not only have naturally different communication styles, but unique approaches to parenting as well. While mothers tend to overprotect their kids, fathers tend to push them toward independence. And whereas many experts tend to advocate “a united front,” Drs. Kyle and Marsha Pruett reveal how Mom and Dad not always being on exactly the same page— which, initially, may seem to cause conflict— can actually strengthen the whole family. Informed by the Pruetts' research and extensive experience with parents and children, Partnership Parenting offers a new outlook. In addition to fascinating biological insights, the book features strategies for negotiating common “landmine situations” from birth to age eight, from discipline and bedtime to helping kids with homework and teaching them responsibility. With wisdom and humor, Partnership Parenting helps couples take advantage of their individual strengths to raise confident children while simultaneously improving their marriage.
Based on the research that brought international recognition to Raine Eisler's groundbreaking work The Chalice and the Blade but addressing the world as it is today, The Power of Partnership offers inspiration and guidance for moving to the better lives we yearn for. Eisler offers us a new lens, a new paradigm, for seeing the world and living in it. The Partnership Model, which emphasizes mutual respect and a fundamental awareness of the sacredness of all life, creates a solid foundation for families, businesses, communities, and the world. In contrast, the suffocating paradigm that has guided much of recorded history — what Eisler calls the Domination Model — has led individuals and groups, acting out of fear, to oppress women, wage war, terrorize, and subjugate others. Using these simple yet far-reaching models, Eisler shows how political and personal relationships based on domination inevitably result in misery and violence, while those founded on partnership foster respect, love, and an explosion of creativity.
Es ist die Geschichte einer Liebe: Maggie Nelson verliebt sich in Harry Dodge, einen Künstler – oder eine Künstlerin? – mit fluider Genderidentität. Harry hat bereits ein Kind, Maggie wird schwanger, zu viert bauen sie ein gemeinsames Leben. "Die Argonauten" ist eine ergreifende Geschichte queeren Familienlebens, zugleich erfindet Maggie Nelson eine ganz eigene Form der philosophischen Erkundung. Memoir, Theorie, Poesie: Es ist ein Buch, das sich nicht einordnen lässt und das unsere Einordnungen herausfordert mit seinem radikal offenen Denken. Im Geiste von Susan Sontag und Roland Barthes verbindet Maggie Nelson theoretische und persönliche Erkenntnissuche, um zu einer neuen Erzählung des Wesens von Liebe und Familie zu gelangen.
This volume tackles key issues in the changing nature of familylife from a global perspective, and is essential reading for thosestudying and working with families. Covers changes in couple relationships and the challenges thesepose; parenting practices and their implications for childdevelopment; key contemporary global issues, such as migration,poverty, and the internet, and their impact on the family; and therole of the state in supporting family relationships Includes a stellar cast of international contributors such asPaul Amato and John Coleman, and contributions from leading expertsbased in North Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand Discusses topics such as cohabitation, divorce, single-parenthouseholds, same-sex partnerships, fertility, and domesticviolence Links research and practice and provides policy recommendationsat the end of each chapter
The essays in this collection deploy biological and social scientific perspectives to evaluate the transformative experience of parenthood for today's women and men. They map the similar and distinct roles mothers and fathers play in their children's lives and measure the effect of gendered parenting on child well-being, work and family arrangements, and the quality of couples' relationships. Contributors describe what happens to brains and bodies when women become mothers and men become fathers; whether the stakes are the same or different for each sex; why, across history and cultures, women are typically more involved in childcare than men; why some fathers are strongly present in their children's lives while others are not; and how the various commitments men and women make to parenting shape their approaches to paid work and romantic relationships. Considering recent changes in men's and women's familial duties, the growing number of single-parent families, and the impassioned tenor of same-sex marriage debates, this book adds sound scientific and theoretical insight to these issues, constituting a standout resource for those interested in the causes and consequences of contemporary gendered parenthood.
From the mommy wars to stay-at-home dads, this work looks at how far parenting roles have evolved from the late 1960s and what child rearing issues still linger in the 21st century.
With contributions from more than two hundred women, this candid, funny, and ultimately soft-hearted take on the feminine covers politics, pop culture, body image, sports, family life, the environment, and much, much more. Original.
For the 200,000 readers of The Chalice and the Blade, here are inspiring and pragmatic stories from influential, creative people on how they use Eisler's partnership principles to shape a better world. Executives, scientists, entrepreneurs and others give voice to the ways they apply balance and partnership in their work and lives.
Exploring the connection between families and inequality, Failure to Flourish: How Law Undermines Family Relationships argues that the legal regulation of families stands fundamentally at odds with the needs of families. Strong, stable, positive relationships are essential for both individuals and society to flourish, but from transportation policy to the criminal justice system, and from divorce rules to the child welfare system, the legal system makes it harder for parents to provide children with these kinds of relationships, exacerbating the growing inequality in America. Failure to Flourish contends that we must re-orient the legal system to help families avoid crises and, when conflicts arise, intervene in a manner that heals relationships. To understand how wrong our family law system has gone and what we need to repair it, Failure to Flourish takes us from ancient Greece to cutting-edge psychological research, and from the chaotic corridors of local family courts to a quiet revolution under way in how services are provided to families in need. Incorporating the latest insights of positive psychology and social science research, the book sets forth a new, more emotionally intelligent vision for a legal system that not only resolves conflict but actively encourages the healthy relationships that are at the core of a stable society.
With the National PTA's Standard for School-Family-Community Partnership as a framework, this guide offers advice for resolving common points of contention between parents and teachers, such as the most productive use of a parent-teacher conference, the best at-home environment for doing homework, the helpfulness of parental rewards for classroom performance, and a teacher's role in supporting a student with an at-home crisis. This solution manual draws from real-world experiences of parents, teachers, and administrators to tackle issues of communication, parenting skills, classroom volunteering, and mutual respect.
This volume focuses on how family-school partnerships are conceptualized, defined, and operationalized as well as the research that is needed to advance these foundational issues. Each chapter integrates prevailing approaches into a research-based framework for supporting learning from pre-K through high school. The book incorporates structural and relational methods into the larger context of educational processes to promote research about collaboration and to improve the academic and behavioral development of students. Diverse theories and models of family-school alliances demonstrate approaches and interventions that are goal-directed and strengths-based, respectful and responsive. In addition, the book analyzes cognitive, behavioral, and interpersonal aspects of partnership and discusses different methods of assessing parental involvement and student outcomes. Included in the coverage are innovative, agenda-setting discussions on: Definitions and conceptual frameworks of family-school partnerships. Need-satisfying partnerships. Diverse parent perspectives and participation. Measurement of family-school partnership constructs over time. Foundational Aspects of Family-School Partnership Research is an essential resource for researchers, professionals, and graduate students in child and school psychology, educational policy and politics, family studies, developmental psychology, sociology of education, sociology, and anthropology.
This accessible guide to child development is written specifically for students of degrees and foundation degrees in Early Years, Early Childhood Studies and related disciplines and for early years practitioners. It introduces the context of child development, how we can develop an understanding of this development and how early years practitioners can support this in practice. It considers the biological/social debate, explores holistic development, examines factors affecting development and includes a chapter on reflective practice. This second edition has been updated to include new guidance for the revised Early Years Foundation Stage. It covers the development check at age two and looks in detail at how a learning of child development relates to early years practice. This edition also includes a new chapter introducing a critique of developmentalism. Throughout, new case studies have been included and interactive activites have been enhanced. About the Early Years series This series has been designed to support students of degrees and foundation degrees in Early Years, Early Childhood and related disciplines. Each text takes a focused look at a specific topic and approaches it in an accessible and user-friendly way. Learning features help readers engage with the text and understanding the subject from a number of different viewpoints. Activities pose questions to prompt thought and discussion and further reading suggestions, including useful websites, are included to help students access extended learning in each topic. Other titles in the series include Early Childhood Studies, Childhood and Society for the Early Years and Exploring Play for Early Childhood Studies. Sally Neaum is a lecturer in Early Childhood, and teaches primary English in initial teacher training. She ahs worked a s a nursery and primary school teacher and as an advisor in early years and inclusion. She has an M.Ed in Educational Psychology and Special Educational Needs and her doctoral research was in the pedagogy of early literacy.
This book addresses the complications and implications of parental involvement as a policy, through an exploratory theoretical approach, including historical and sociological accounts and personal reflection. This approach represents the author's effort to understand the origins, meanings, and effects of parental involvement as a prerequisite of schooling and particularly as a policy 'solution' for low achievement and even inequity in the American educational system. Most of the policy and research discourse on school-family relations exalts the partnership ideal, taking for granted its desirability and viability, the perspective of parents on specific involvement in instruction, and the conditions of diverse families in fulfilling their appointed role in the partnership. De Carvalho takes a distinct stance. She argues that the partnership-parental ideal neglects several major factors: It proclaims parental involvement as a means to enhance (and perhaps equalize) school outcomes, but disregards how family material and cultural conditions, and feelings about schooling, differ according to social class; thus, the partnership-parental involvement ideal is more likely to be a projection of the model of upper-middle class, suburban community schooling than an open invitation for diverse families to recreate schooling. Although it appeals to the image of the traditional community school, the pressure for more family educational accountability really overlooks history as well as present social conditions. Finally, family-school relations are relations of power, but most families are powerless. De Carvalho makes the case that two linked effects of this policy are the gravest: the imposition of a particular parenting style and intrusion into family life, and the escalation of educational inequality. Rethinking Family-School Relations: A Critique of Parental Involvement in Schooling--a carefully researched and persuasively argued work--is essential reading for all school professionals, parents, and individuals concerned with public schooling and educational equality.
This book provides a "work-in-progress" that seeks to capture the micro (direct service) and macro (managerial) perspectives related to identifying evidence for practice within the practice domain of public child welfare. It is divided into two categories; namely, evidence for direct practice and evidence for management practice. In Part I, the articles are categorized in the areas of child welfare assessment and child welfare outcomes. Expanded versions of the chapters can be accessed at www.bassc.net. In Part II, the focus is on organizational issues that relate to evidence for management practice. This section includes an overview of evidence-based practice from an organizational perspective along with evidence related to the experiences of others in implementing evidence-based practice. This book pushes the discussion of evidence-based practice in several new directions regarding: 1) the use of structured reviews to complement the systematic reviews of the Cochrane and Campbell Collaboratives, 2) the process of viewing the call for evidence-based practice as a goal or future vision of practice and evidence for practice provides a more immediate approach to promote evidence-informed practice, and 3) a recognition that evidence-informed practice is part of building agency-based knowledge sharing systems that involve the tacit and explicit knowledge needed to improve the outcomes of social services. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal Of Evidence-Based Social Work.
This book offers a ground-breaking analysis of how women's movements have been remaking citizenship in multicultural Europe. Presenting the findings of a large scale, multi-disciplinary cross-national feminist research project, FEMCIT, it develops an expanded, multi-dimensional understanding of citizenship as practice and experience.
Fully revised and restructured, this fresh edition offersstudents and trainee social workers an incisive and authoritativeintroduction to the subject. As well as entirely new sections ontheory and practice, the expert contributions which have shaped thecompanion’s leading reputation have been updated and nowinclude innovative standalone essays on social work theory. Comprehensively reworked new edition comprising six substantivesections covering essential topics for trainee social workers– in effect, six books in one Includes an extensive introduction and chapters by leadingexperts on the focus and purpose of social work Provides a unified textbook for trainees and an invaluableprofessional reference volume Features a wealth of new material on theory and practicealongside detailed expositions of the social and psychologicalframework, stages in the human life cycle, and the objectives andcore components of social work Each chapter lists five key points to remember, questions fordiscussion, and recommendations for further reading
Historically, there has been little integration of theoretical or applied research on addiction treatment and parenting intervention development. Rather, the fields of addiction and developmental research have progressed on largely separate trajectories, even though their focus powerfully and often tragically intersects each time a parent is diagnosed with a substance use disorder. Parenting and Substance Abuse is the first book to report on pioneering efforts to move the treatment of substance-abusing parents forward by embracing their roles and experiences as mothers and fathers directly and continually across the course of treatment. The chapters in this volume represent important new strides among researchers and clinicians to address and close the increasingly recognizable gap between addiction and developmental science. Chapters focus on current, state-of-the-art treatment models for parents, primarily pregnant and parenting women, including descriptions of innovative treatments currently being developed and evaluated that focus on parental addiction and the parent-child relationship within a developmental framework. Part I covers the theoretical understandings of how addiction impacts the developmental processes of parenting. Part II discusses risk assessment, evaluation, and a variety of interventions and therapies. This unique volume will be of importance to clinicians, researchers, students, and trainees in the health professions who develop, implement, and evaluate interventions for parental addiction, including in well-baby clinics, primary care settings, pediatric clinics, and residential and outpatient drug treatment programs.
This volume focuses on context considerations in family-school partnership research. The book examines how cultural diversity, including differences in parenting (e.g., race, education, family history) and diverse school variables (e.g., location, population, organization,) can affect family-school partnerships. Its bio ecological perspective pinpoints critical areas that studies need to address for real-world utility, such as parental commitment and developmental considerations. Although the book’s focus is research, chapters present program designs and evaluations along with ideas for community involvement and policy. The authors also explore the changing landscape for home-school partnerships resulting from the impact of technology, which is rapidly becoming a central player in organizing research and bringing interventions to life. Topics covered include: Complexities in field-based partnership research. Family-centered, school-based interventions. A district leadership approach to school, family and community partnerships. Research issues to forward a policy agenda supporting family-school partnerships. Testing statistical moderation in research on home-school partnerships. Integrating current and evolving knowledge toward future directions for research. Contexts of Family-School Partnerships is a valuable resource for researchers, professionals and graduate students in child and school psychology, educational policy and politics, family studies, developmental psychology, sociology of education, sociology and anthropology.

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