Explores gender-based parenting and communication styles to reveal how to overcome conflicts and adapt instinct-based techniques in complementary ways, in a guide that offers insight into biological factors while identifying common milestone pitfalls. Original.
Men and women not only have naturally different communication styles, but unique approaches to parenting as well. While mothers tend to overprotect their kids, fathers tend to push them toward independence. And whereas many experts tend to advocate “a united front,” Drs. Kyle and Marsha Pruett reveal how Mom and Dad not always being on exactly the same page— which, initially, may seem to cause conflict— can actually strengthen the whole family. Informed by the Pruetts' research and extensive experience with parents and children, Partnership Parenting offers a new outlook. In addition to fascinating biological insights, the book features strategies for negotiating common “landmine situations” from birth to age eight, from discipline and bedtime to helping kids with homework and teaching them responsibility. With wisdom and humor, Partnership Parenting helps couples take advantage of their individual strengths to raise confident children while simultaneously improving their marriage.
Men and women not only have naturally different communication styles, but unique approaches to parenting as well. While mothers tend to overprotect their kids, fathers tend to push them toward independence. And whereas many experts tend to advocate “a united front,” Drs. Kyle and Marsha Pruett reveal how Mom and Dad not always being on exactly the same page— which, initially, may seem to cause conflict— can actually strengthen the whole family. Informed by the Pruetts' research and extensive experience with parents and children, Partnership Parenting offers a new outlook. In addition to fascinating biological insights, the book features strategies for negotiating common “landmine situations” from birth to age eight, from discipline and bedtime to helping kids with homework and teaching them responsibility. With wisdom and humor, Partnership Parenting helps couples take advantage of their individual strengths to raise confident children while simultaneously improving their marriage.
This volume tackles key issues in the changing nature of family life from a global perspective, and is essential reading for those studying and working with families. Covers changes in couple relationships and the challenges these pose; parenting practices and their implications for child development; key contemporary global issues, such as migration, poverty, and the internet, and their impact on the family; and the role of the state in supporting family relationships Includes a stellar cast of international contributors such as Paul Amato and John Coleman, and contributions from leading experts based in North Africa, Japan, Australia and New Zealand Discusses topics such as cohabitation, divorce, single-parent households, same-sex partnerships, fertility, and domestic violence Links research and practice and provides policy recommendations at the end of each chapter
Features a list of the mythological argonauts, provided online by Bob Fisher. Explains that according to Greek mythology, Jason assembled the argonauts to help him search for the golden fleece. Includes the name of each argonaut and his father. Notes the sources used.
Advice to couples aimed at improving communication and reaching consensus on strategies for raising responsible, successful children.
The renowned child psychologist explains how to cultivate a better parent-child relationship while also nurturing empathy, honesty, resilience, and independence. Parents have an important task: figure out who their child is--his or her skills, preferences, beliefs, values, personality traits, goals, and direction--get comfortable with it, and then help him or her pursue and live a life that is congruent with it. But parents also want to have influence. They want their kid to be independent, but not if he or she is going to make bad choices. They don't want to be harsh and rigid, nor do they want a noncompliant, disrespectful kid. They want to avoid being too pushy and overbearing, but not if an unmotivated, apathetic kid is what they'll have to show for it. They want to have a good relationship with their kid, but not if that means being a pushover. They don't want to scream, but they do want to be heard. Good parenting is about striking the balance between a child's characteristics and a parent's desire to have influence. Now, Dr. Ross Greene offers a detailed and practical guide for raising children in a way that enhances relationships, improves communication, and helps kids learn how to resolve disagreements without conflict. Through his well-known model of solving problems collaboratively, parents can forgo time-out and sticker charts; stop badgering, berating, threatening, and punishing; allow their kids to feel heard and validated. From homework to hygiene and curfews to screen time, Raising Human Beings arms parents with the tools they need to raise kids in ways that are non-punitive and non-adversarial to bring out the best in both parents and children.--Adapted from dust jacket.
What if every parenting problem or concern we encounter as parents gave us an extraordinary learning and relationship-building experience? They can. Beyond Good Parenting is about how our human behavior works, how learning happens, and the significance of the messages we have absorbed and have passed on to our children without noticing. It's about the relational and conversational environment that we create every day in our family. What if we could focus on something beyond our ideas of good and bad, something that begs us to talk with each other? We can. Marty includes many stories as he walks readers through the process of early learning and relating, and the science behind why we all say and do what we do. He introduces new ideas for quickly building safe learning and partnering environments that fulfill our lives and enliven those around us.
Numerous studies have been conducted across decades on the effects living in a divided or blended family have on children. The unwavering consensus is - Children who live in divided or blended families face greater risks than their counterparts. Among other things, they are more likely to drop out of school, abuse drugs and alcohol, have greater and earlier sexual activity, experience incarceration and teenage pregnancy, and need psychological counseling. "America's Blended Family Expert," Merissa V. Grayson, understands that with the right mindset and action, you can ensure that your children avoid these risks and thrive in spite of the fact that their parents live in two separate homes. In "The Business of Co-Parenting for Dads," Merissa teaches you her Business Model Mindset; a way of thinking that is goal based, action oriented, and results centered in order to ensure the protection and growth of your most important asset, your child. By incorporating this model into your divided or blended family, you will learn to: -Master the dynamics of a divided/blended family and understand everyone involved, starting with yourself -Understand Her: recognize the type of mother you are dealing with from "irrational moms" to present moms, her probable perspective, and how to interact accordingly. -Adjust to new things: child support, new schedules, new home life, and new significant others. -Handle things the legal way: resolve denied child visitation, alienation, and family law disputes via the legal system. -Implement the 5 co-parenting actions required to eliminate drama. And more! This book has inspired men and dramatically changed their lives by shifting the way they think about and handle co-parenting and it can change your life too!
This Is Parenting on Your Own Terms Chances are, you'd rather not forfeit your happy, rested life the moment you become a parent. As a mom, you may want to keep your career, but aren't sure how to balance it with housework and childcare. As a dad, you probably want to witness your child's milestones, but a demanding job may get in the way. And what about time for yourself (never mind your sex life)? Marc and Amy Vachon were determined to beat this scenario when their first child was born. They vowed to sidestep the world's expectations of new parents and create a parenthood model that worked for them. Their strategy was to share everything-the good and the bad. They became peers in each area of parenthood: childcare, housework, and breadwinning. They also made time for themselves, and for each other. They shared the burdens so nobody was overwhelmed, and the joys so neither missed out on the fun. Drawing on Marc and Amy's experiences, as well as those of dozens of ESP couples, Equally Shared Parenting shows you how to create a balanced life that is rarely experienced by today's parents. It's not just about who vacuums and who does the dishes, or who brings in the paycheck and who tends to the kids. You'll learn how to look at every aspect of parenthood, money, careers, and your individual needs, so you can build a life that works for you both.
Very few families are perfect. But looking from the outside in, through conversations in the grocery store or clicking through social media, oftentimes it seems we are the only ones struggling with raising our kids or aligning with our spouses on parenting. The reality is that so many families struggle. Vicki Hoefle, three-time author, parenting coach, and sought-after speaker, offers a fresh, practical roadmap for achievable family—and marital—harmony and happiness. Her strategies work for everyone: whether you have young children and are just starting the parenting journey; are beginning to experience the first challenges of raising children in the 21st century; or if you’re facing crisis, stress, or the effects of divorce. Hoefle inspires REAL families and shows them how to invest in the relationship, focus on what is important, and experience the joy of living in a healthy, loving family.
In this practical book, two experts provide straightforward co-parenting advice to parents facing separation or divorce who wish to pursue the shared parenting approach. Drawing on their extensive experience and research, the authors emphasize the importance of children having significant time with both parents, allowing them to maintain meaningful relationships. By presenting the benefits and challenges, debunking the myths, giving practical tips on communication between the two households, and providing concrete tools to aid in creating co-parenting plans, this book steers parents past their personal feelings toward a successful resolution that is in everyone’s best interest. From the Trade Paperback edition.
"While Partnered Parenting is an emotional experience, this book focuses on practical issues: Is partnered parenting right for you? What's the best way to screen potential partners on the Internet? What's a co-parenting courtship like? Will a partnered parenting contract be fair, effective, and legal?" Partnered Parenting encompasses a wide variety of arrangements in which parents do not have a marital or romantic connection. It's a family by choice that thousands of people are creating for many different reasons... -- To relieve the pressure of finding the "perfect" life partner. -- To avoid the ticking clock of needing to be married while still fertile. -- To freely search for an ideal marriage partner while moving forward with a family plan. -- To sustain a romantic interest with someone who can't have children or doesn't want a family. -- To continue a career without sacrificing the dream of having a family. -- To create a family that is compatible with many alternative lifestyles. -- To build a secure, loving home that fulfills material, emotional, and spiritual needs of parents and children alike. Rachel has been featured in national and international media, including ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, CNN, BBC, The Randy Martin Show KTOP (Washington DC), The Ricky Lake Show, The Jeff Probst Show, Sunrise Australia, Daybreak (UK), the New York Times, Al Jazeera, You Magazine (UK), The Observer (UK), Grazia Magazine (UK) and more. Rachel is also a regular contributor to the Google blog mom.me. She will be a featured speaker at the Fertility Planit conference at UCLA, in April 2014. She and her family are dual residents of Los Angeles and Hawaii.
Accessible, easy-to-follow guide to teaching parents and other caregivers to value and support a child's development.
Decades of research have demonstrated that the parent-child dyad and the environment of the familyâ€"which includes all primary caregiversâ€"are at the foundation of children’s well- being and healthy development. From birth, children are learning and rely on parents and the other caregivers in their lives to protect and care for them. The impact of parents may never be greater than during the earliest years of life, when a child’s brain is rapidly developing and when nearly all of her or his experiences are created and shaped by parents and the family environment. Parents help children build and refine their knowledge and skills, charting a trajectory for their health and well-being during childhood and beyond. The experience of parenting also impacts parents themselves. For instance, parenting can enrich and give focus to parents’ lives; generate stress or calm; and create any number of emotions, including feelings of happiness, sadness, fulfillment, and anger. Parenting of young children today takes place in the context of significant ongoing developments. These include: a rapidly growing body of science on early childhood, increases in funding for programs and services for families, changing demographics of the U.S. population, and greater diversity of family structure. Additionally, parenting is increasingly being shaped by technology and increased access to information about parenting. Parenting Matters identifies parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices associated with positive developmental outcomes in children ages 0-8; universal/preventive and targeted strategies used in a variety of settings that have been effective with parents of young children and that support the identified knowledge, attitudes, and practices; and barriers to and facilitators for parents’ use of practices that lead to healthy child outcomes as well as their participation in effective programs and services. This report makes recommendations directed at an array of stakeholders, for promoting the wide-scale adoption of effective programs and services for parents and on areas that warrant further research to inform policy and practice. It is meant to serve as a roadmap for the future of parenting policy, research, and practice in the United States.
Helicopter parents—the kind that continue to hover even in college—are one of the most ridiculed figures of twenty-first-century parenting, criticized for creating entitled young adults who boomerang back home. But do involved parents really damage their children and burden universities? In this book, sociologist Laura T. Hamilton illuminates the lives of young women and their families to ask just what role parents play during the crucial college years. Hamilton vividly captures the parenting approaches of mothers and fathers from all walks of life—from a CFO for a Fortune 500 company to a waitress at a roadside diner. As she shows, parents are guided by different visions of the ideal college experience, built around classed notions of women’s work/family plans and the ideal age to “grow up.” Some are intensively involved and hold adulthood at bay to cultivate specific traits: professional helicopters, for instance, help develop the skills and credentials that will advance their daughters’ careers, while pink helicopters emphasize appearance, charm, and social ties in the hopes that women will secure a wealthy mate. In sharp contrast, bystander parents—whose influence is often limited by economic concerns—are relegated to the sidelines of their daughter’s lives. Finally, paramedic parents—who can come from a wide range of class backgrounds—sit in the middle, intervening in emergencies but otherwise valuing self-sufficiency above all. Analyzing the effects of each of these approaches with clarity and depth, Hamilton ultimately argues that successfully navigating many colleges and universities without involved parents is nearly impossible, and that schools themselves are increasingly dependent on active parents for a wide array of tasks, with intended and unintended consequences. Altogether, Parenting to a Degree offers an incisive look into the new—and sometimes problematic—relationship between students, parents, and universities.
Arguing that the mother/child bond tells only part of the story of a healthy childhood, a renowned child psychiatrist shows that fathers play an important role in a child's physical, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development.
Parenting for Social Change transforms the dominant view of childhood and challenges readers to move beyond control as a tool for ensuring children grow up to be healthy and responsible adults.
Based on the research that brought international recognition to Raine Eisler's groundbreaking work The Chalice and the Blade but addressing the world as it is today, The Power of Partnership offers inspiration and guidance for moving to the better lives we yearn for. Eisler offers us a new lens, a new paradigm, for seeing the world and living in it. The Partnership Model, which emphasizes mutual respect and a fundamental awareness of the sacredness of all life, creates a solid foundation for families, businesses, communities, and the world. In contrast, the suffocating paradigm that has guided much of recorded history — what Eisler calls the Domination Model — has led individuals and groups, acting out of fear, to oppress women, wage war, terrorize, and subjugate others. Using these simple yet far-reaching models, Eisler shows how political and personal relationships based on domination inevitably result in misery and violence, while those founded on partnership foster respect, love, and an explosion of creativity.
This tells of twenty-four couples negotiating the emotional and practical journey of parenting their learning 'disabled' child. The author, a researcher, sociologist and mother of a learning disabled daughter, questions the weak inclusive education discourse and unpacks parents' narratives in relation to denial, disappointment and social exclusion.

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