Christmas 1941 came little more than two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The shock—in some cases overseas, elation—was worldwide. While Americans attempted to go about celebrating as usual, the reality of the just-declared war was on everybody’s mind. United States troops on Wake Island were battling a Japanese landing force and, in the Philippines, losing the fight to save Luzon. In Japan, the Pearl Harbor strike force returned to Hiroshima Bay and toasted its sweeping success. Across the Atlantic, much of Europe was frozen in grim Nazi occupation. Just three days before Christmas, Churchill surprised Roosevelt with an unprecedented trip to Washington, where they jointly lit the White House Christmas tree. As the two Allied leaders met to map out a winning wartime strategy, the most remarkable Christmas of the century played out across the globe. Pearl Harbor Christmas is a deeply moving and inspiring story about what it was like to live through a holiday season few would ever forget.
“A valuable reexamination” (Booklist, starred review) of the event that changed twentieth-century America—Pearl Harbor—based on years of research and new information uncovered by a New York Times bestselling author. The America we live in today was born, not on July 4, 1776, but on December 7, 1941, when an armada of 354 Japanese warplanes supported by aircraft carriers, destroyers, and midget submarines suddenly and savagely attacked the United States, killing 2,403 men—and forced America’s entry into World War II. Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness follows the sailors, soldiers, pilots, diplomats, admirals, generals, emperor, and president as they engineer, fight, and react to this stunningly dramatic moment in world history. Beginning in 1914, bestselling author Craig Nelson maps the road to war, when Franklin D. Roosevelt, then the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, attended the laying of the keel of the USS Arizona at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Writing with vivid intimacy, Nelson traces Japan’s leaders as they lurch into ultranationalist fascism, which culminates in their scheme to terrify America with one of the boldest attacks ever waged. Within seconds, the country would never be the same. Backed by a research team’s five years of work, as well as Nelson’s thorough re-examination of the original evidence assembled by federal investigators, this page-turning and definitive work “weaves archival research, interviews, and personal experiences from both sides into a blow-by-blow narrative of destruction liberally sprinkled with individual heroism, bizarre escapes, and equally bizarre tragedies” (Kirkus Reviews). Nelson delivers all the terror, chaos, violence, tragedy, and heroism of the attack in stunning detail, and offers surprising conclusions about the tragedy’s unforeseen and resonant consequences that linger even today.
This book is a study of a crucial period in the life of American jazz and popular music. Pearl Harbor Jazz analyses the changes in the world of the professional musician brought about both by the outbreak of World War II and by long-term changes in the music business, in popular taste and in American society itself. It describes how the infrastructure of American music, the interdependent fields of recording, touring, live engagements, radio and the movies, was experiencing change in the conditions of wartime, and how this impacted upon musical styles, and hence upon the later history of popular music. Successive chapters of the book examine the impact of these changed conditions upon the songwriting and music publishing industries, upon the world of the touring big bands, and upon changing conceptions of the role of jazz and popular music. Not only the economic conditions but also ideas were changing; the book traces a movement among writers and critics which created new definitions of 'jazz' and other terms that had a permanent influence on the way musical styles were thought of for the rest of the century. The book deals in some depth with the work of a number of important artists in these various fields, including, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Johnny Mercer and Frank Sinatra, looks at the growing presence of bebop, the rise of country music, and the contemporary musical scenes in such locations as New York and Los Angeles. The book combines detail of the day to day working lives of musicians with challenging views of the long-term development of musical style in jazz and popular music. Peter Townsend lectures at Manchester Metropolitan University and in the School of Music at the University of Huddersfield, England
Over half a century after the event, we are marking the distruction or our naval fleet by the Empire of Japan.at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Part history and part mystery story, Finding Pearl Harbor is the first of five books about children growing up onthe home front during WorldWar II. Set in a small rural community the children are learning to cope with highly personal issues of their own when suddenly confronted with the possiblilty of war invading their isolated lives. Larry, the oldest, wants to join the army, but is charged with the care of his lttle sister, Molly, who firmly believes their mother is with the angels. Stella struggles to understand her strange gift of second sight. Ellen’s mother seems bitterly unloving for no good reason. Barbara, sent from England to escape the bombs, works hard at settling into her new life. Roland handicapped, silent and brooding seeks ways to reach out to the others. Finding Pearl Harbor is fiction, but the events of World War II are carefully interwoven into the story. It is the children’s task to come to terms with them in a world where they think “nobody ever tells you anything.”
An anecdote-rich narrative of the 1950 holiday season during the Korean War, when, just after Thanksgiving, tens of thousands of US troops were surrounded in the Chosin reservoir area by hundreds of thousands of Chinese troops and began a terrible and difficult retreat, which finally ended on Christmas Day.
DOMINIC I was an atmospheric nuclear weapons test series conducted in the Pacific Ocean area in 1962. It included 5 high-altitude shots at Johnston Island, 29 airdrop airburst events near Johnston and Christmas Islands, one Polaris-launched airburst in the Christmas Island area, and one underwater test in the Pacific Ocean off the United States West Coast. This is a report on DOD personnel with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.
A collection of essays that address the origins of the food you eat, including how organically-grown food measures up against locally-grown produce, and how the differences between large and small farms can affect the food on your table. Original.
On the surface, "wartime" is a period of time in which a society is at war. But we now live in what President Obama has called "an age without surrender ceremonies," where it is no longer easy to distinguish between times of war and times of peace. In this inventive meditation on war, time, and the law, Mary Dudziak argues that wartime is not as discrete a time period as we like to think. Instead, America has been engaged in some form of ongoing overseas armed conflict for over a century. Meanwhile policy makers and the American public continue to view wars as exceptional events that eventually give way to normal peace times. This has two consequences: first, because war is thought to be exceptional, "wartime" remains a shorthand argument justifying extreme actions like torture and detention without trial; and second, ongoing warfare is enabled by the inattention of the American people. More disconnected than ever from the wars their nation is fighting, public disengagement leaves us without political restraints on the exercise of American war powers.
Burke's World War II heroics and unprecedented three terms as chief of naval operations are recounted in this stirring biography.
A novel about the heroic actions of four Army chaplins after the troop ship they were on was torpedoed in the North Atlantic.
Christmas in the 400-year-old city of Santa Fe is a rich cultural feast of Spanish, Anglo, and Native American traditions. Through stories and color photos, Christmas in Santa Fe illustrates those traditions, from glowing farolitos that line buildings and walkways, to the Christmas-day dances at the pueblos, to the Spanish nativity plays performed on the plaza. Christmas in Santa Fe is the perfect souvenir for visitors and gift for residents.
Oh, those Christmas memories. We all have them, locked away in our hearts. But what about the Christmases we weren’t there for? The one our favorite heirloom ornament came from, or the one we know only from a picture of our newlywed parents smiling under the mistletoe?In Christmas Memories, Susan Waggoner, author of STC’s It’s a Wonderful Christmas and Under the Tree, looks at bygone holidays from the perspective of those who lived them. Beginning with “Christmas in the Melting Pot,” which depicts yuletide in the early 1920s, the author presents detailed snapshots that re-create holiday seasons past. She chronicles the gifts, activities, fads, and fancies that made each Christmas unique; indulges in fantasy shopping at yesterday’s prices; shares thoughts from letters, diaries, and magazines of the era; and makes the past pop to life with vibrantperiod art. Readers will revel in the irresistible nostalgia of Christmas Memories.
Lloyd Aloysius Casey - born December 18, 1926 in Anaheim, California; will die anytime from June 12, 2007 to perhaps 2016 in Dublin, Ohio. Casey married Mary Grace Wells of Baltimore, Maryland on September 3, 1949. Charles Mark was born on June 28, 1950, Kevin Emmett on May 27, 1952, John Patrick on March 15, 1954, Paul Francis on July 11, 1956, Colleen Ann on March 14, 1959, Christopher Wells on August 7, 1963 and Kathleen Mary on January 14, 1969. In January 1980, Casey considering that he might be dead by 1981, made an effort to write some thoughts about life to be given to his and Gracie's children as a Christmas present. Still being alive in 1990 he did another Christmas present and then again in 2000. He quit but did write special requests. This book, to be given to each of the seven in 2007 is the last of such Christmas presents. Other than trying to be an acceptable father, he had numerous adventures. If he becomes what society considers "mature" before he dies it will be a surprise to himself and those who know him. His signature sign off on correspondence, love, peace, joy, pretty well sums up what he has valued. 2007 is a year to end this. Gracie and Casey are alive and in reasonably good health. All seven are alive and making the best of their lives. We have thirteen grandchildren and four great grandchildren. What more could anyone want?
Having grandchildren late in life means that they will never really get to know you. This was the case for me and for my children. I never knew my grandparents as they lived and died in Ireland before I had a chance to go there. I might have gone over in 1950 and seen my maternal grandfather Patrick Quinn. He was the only grandparent living when it was possible, after the war, to visit Ireland. Regretfully, I didnt go when I had the chance, and he died in 1951.
Theres a war going on, and ten-year-old Clementine Rose Miles can size up the situation better than anyone. She tells a very grownup story with a childs humor and candor. In spite of one disaster after another befalling the Miles family, tears, love, and laughter anchor them to their faith.
Christmas in Chicago back in the forties and fifties was different. The weather was different, the people jarred from their usual concerns, and the things that happened strange, delightful, and often wacky. There was no stigma attached to being poor, to working with your hands, or to being out of work. We were all in this, whatever this was, together.
Have yourself a crooked little Christmas with The Big Book of Christmas Mysteries. Edgar Award-winning editor Otto Penzler collects sixty of his all-time favorite holiday crime stories--many of which are difficult or nearly impossible to find anywhere else. From classic Victorian tales by Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Thomas Hardy, to contemporary stories by Sara Paretsky and Ed McBain, this collection touches on all aspects of the holiday season, and all types of mysteries. They are suspenseful, funny, frightening, and poignant. Included are puzzles by Mary Higgins Clark, Isaac Asimov, and Ngaio Marsh; uncanny tales in the tradition of A Christmas Carol by Peter Lovesey and Max Allan Collins; O. Henry-like stories by Stanley Ellin and Joseph Shearing, stories by pulp icons John D. MacDonald and Damon Runyon; comic gems from Donald E. Westlake and John Mortimer; and many, many more. Almost any kind of mystery you’re in the mood for--suspense, pure detection, humor, cozy, private eye, or police procedural—can be found in these pages. FEATURING: - Unscrupulous Santas - Crimes of Christmases Past and Present - Festive felonies - Deadly puddings - Misdemeanors under the mistletoe - Christmas cases for classic characters including Sherlock Holmes, Brother Cadfael, Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot, Ellery Queen, Rumpole of the Bailey, Inspector Morse, Inspector Ghote, A.J. Raffles, and Nero Wolfe.

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