The most powerful shaman of the People of the Bear Mother invites a young woman to take her soul's great adventure by painting a new piece of animal art on the walls in the deepest chambers of the awesome Great Cave. The time has come for Little Bear to make the life-altering choice to overcome her fear of the terrifying old shaman, and in doing so, unalterably change all the lives her soul will subsequently experience even as her "lion eye" reappears in each lifetime to identify her avatar. But before she may embark on her hero's journey, she must be initiated as hunter and then as Seer through trials, ordeals, and the revelations of her people's mythology expressed in the art of the Cave. The tale builds to an unexpected climax as one soul experiences many lifetimes in a hunting culture where being born female or male, homosexual or heterosexual, young or old are equally valid ways of being human. Inspired by the work of Joseph Campbell and the artwork of France's 35,000-yearold Chauvet Cave, the novel takes a fresh look at, and is a new take on, the life-ways and religion of our earliest ancestors through Little Bear's encounters with shamans, hunters, avatars, and painted caves. This story reveals that the spiritual messages hidden within this magnificent, incredibly ancient art are the same metaphysical beliefs of the New Age and the same universal human truths at the heart of every world religion and mystical philosophy. 2011 Book Competition Finalist Awards: USA Best Book Awards for New Age Fiction; IBA for Chick Lit-Women's Fiction; IBA for Gay-Lesbian Fiction.
A twenty-four-year-old grizzly bear gives birth to her last litter of cubs, then spends three years teaching them what they need to know to survive in their southern British Columbia home before they go off on their own. Includes facts about grizzlies and the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary.
At its pinnacle in A.D. 1150 the Anasazi empire of the Southwest would see no equal in North America for almost eight hundred years. Yet even at this cultural zenith, the Anasazi held the seeds of their own destruction deep within themselves.... On his deathbed, the Great Sun Chief learns a secret, a shame so vile to him that even at the brink of eternity he cannot let it pass: In a village far to the north is a fifteen-summers-old girl who must be found. Though he knows neither her name nor her face, the Great Sun decrees that the girl must at all costs be killed. Fleeing for her life as her village lies in ruins, young Cornsilk is befriended by Poor Singer, a curious youth seeking to touch the soul of the Katchinas. Together, they undertake the perilous task of staying alive long enough to discover her true identity. But time is running out for them all--a desperate killer stalks them, one who is willing to destroy the entire Anasazi world to get to her. New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors and award-winning archaeologists W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear bring the stories of these first North Americans to life in People of the Silence and other volumes in the magnicent North America's Forgotten Past series. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
This important engaging book records the first acquaintance of poets from American Indian and Native Siberian cultures as they come to recognize their similar cultures, life-ways, and reverence for the natural world. The poetic dialogues contain a mutual recognition of kinsmen across centuries of mutual isolation. Perhaps their chief value is the declaration of fundamental human values, expressing the authors’ deepest aspirations as spokesmen for traditional cultures. As Alexander Vashchenko concludes in his commentary, “This poetic calling-forth offers an important lesson to all of us who live from day to day, with confused priorities, without a thought to eternity; who forsake our original nature—our distant, ancient kinsman, the Bear, that mighty spirit of Mother Nature and powerful symbol of our enormous, universal nation.” The Foreword, Afterword, supplementary notes, and Editor’s Note limn the historical and biographical background that make this text a world’s first, inspiring a call for future intercontinental collaborations of indigenous writers. Contributors include Nathan Romero, Susan Scarberry-Garcia, Claude Clayton Smith, Alexander Vashchenko, James Walter, and Andrew Wiget.
What causes bear attacks? When should you play dead and when should you fight an attacking bear? What do we know about black and grizzly bears and how can this knowledge be used to avoid bear attacks? And, more generally, what is the bear’s future? Bear Attacks is a thorough and unflinching landmark study of the attacks made on men and women by the great grizzly and the occasionally deadly black bear. This is a book for everyone who hikes, camps, or visits bear country–and for anyone who wants to know more about these sometimes fearsome but always fascinating wild creatures.
The Bear Book brings together an impressive range of bear--usually big, hairy men who favor full-face beards and prefer to wear jeans and flannel shirts--viewpoints to explore this unique social and cultural phenomenon that stretches from America to western Europe to Australia! On the personal level, you learn what beardom means to different people in their daily lives, and on a broader level, its cultural implications for not only the gay community, but also society as a whole. As this book moves across the wide spectrum of bear identities, you learn about the defining forces of identity, the significance of differences among masculinities, and the shapings of the bear movement from different viewpoints. The Bear Book is the first compilation of sociological and cultural analytical investigations of the contemporary gay bear phenomenon. To this end, Editor Les Wright brings together both objective and subjective viewpoints to create a forum where bears can speak for themselves. Through their voices, you'll learn about: bears and sexual identity gay male iconography socializing on the Internet sexual politics (gender, class, "looks-ism," and body image) gay mass media, the single most powerful force in the current construction of "bears" bears, power, and glamor bear-as-image vs. bear-as-attitude Gays, lesbians, lesbigay scholars, bears, and social scientists are sure to find The Bear Book thought-provoking and insightful as it broaches questions such as: Are bears caught up in a utopian-romantic impulse to reinvent themselves? What was radical lesbianism's impact on the bear movement? To what extent are bears only another group of exploited consumers in a fragmented market system? And, is it possible to establish social liberation through enslavement to your sexual passions? For both your pleasure and your education, The Bear Book examines nearly every corner of beardom, including bear history, identity, social spaces, iconography, and its constituency abroad.
A fresh look at the World Heritage Site that includes Avebury henge, West Kennet long barrow and Silbury Hill. Mann combines archaeology, astronomy and anthropology to offer an original and convincing account of the building of these extraordinary Neolithic monuments. The ancient Britons were inspired by a profound knowledge of the heavens when they erected the monumental stones of Avebury. Mann throws light on the motive behind the creation of its awe-inspiring mounds and megaliths by demonstrating that they were aligned to the cycles of the Sun, Moon and stars. This book will help visitors and readers to see Avebury in a wholly new light - the light of the heavenly bodies that guided its Neolithic builders. Avebury Cosmos will reawaken our ancient reverence for the stars and deepen our respect for the extraordinary abilities and forgotten knowledge of our prehistoric ancestors.
"These poems have magic."--Willis Barnstone, author of Sweetbitter Love: Poems of Sappho "Ko Un's work springs from a passionate dedication to the task of making whole again the narratives of the disrupted lives of Korea's people. No one has done more for what is coming gradually but ever more clearly to be recognized as Korea's literature of the twenty-first century."--David McCann, Director of the Korea Institute at Harvard University "Ko Un is a crucial poet for the twenty-first century and this is an enormously fresh and vivid translation."--Robert Hass
"A funny and imaginative read-aloud" A mother is surprised when her son tells her that there is a bear standing outside their door. How did the bear get all the way from his cave in the forest to their eleventh-floor apartment? And what is it doing here in the middle of the city? This sweet story of a wacky chain of events will appeal to young readers who like to make up their own tall tales.
New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear are famous for writing novels about prehistoric America that are fast-paced, steeped in cultural detail, and smart. In People of the Owl they combine their distinctive trademark of high action with a rich psychological drama. Four thousand years ago, in what centuries later will be the southern part of the United States, a boy is thrust into manhood long before he's ready. Young Salamander would much rather catch crickets and watch blue herons fish than dabble in the politics of his clan. But when his heroic brother is killed, Salamander becomes the leader of America's first city. He inherits his brother's two wives, who despise him, and is forced to marry his mortal enemy's daughter to forge an alliance for the trade goods his people desperately need. Cast adrift in a stark wilderness of political intrigue where assassins are everywhere, young Salamander has no choice but to become a man-and quickly. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Researcher Luisa Marshall was used to studying bears, not being studied by one. But Skinwalker Ty Moon has been watching her for months, admiring how she cared for animals...and being driven wild with arousal. Though he vowed to remain solitary, his wanting was too strong to be contained--especially when he brings an injured Luisa home to his cabin....
The shamanic understanding of animals as guides to self-knowledge and the soul comes alive in close encounters with some of the most magnificent creatures of the wild.
The symbols and strange images that we find in our cemeteries, religious structures, banks and in our parks are the same symbols that have been part of the framework of the human psyche for thousands of years. While contemporary man may think that they are simply decorative manifestations of a by-gone era, they represent the fears, dreams, ideas, beliefs and struggles that humankind has endured since we began to walk upright. This book surveys many of these icons and will give a meaning for them both in the context of ancient history and folklore as well as a meaning that is suitable for our contemporary times. Illustrated with dozens of photographs, this book will be of interest to anyone interested in historic preservation, ancient symbolism, the Green Man and the universal application of imagery. Gary R. Varner has written numerous books on ancient traditions, folklore, the environment and contemporary issues. He is a member of the American Folklore Society and the Foundation for Mythological Studies.
In People of the Raven, award-winning archaeologists and New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear spin a vivid and captivating tale around one of the most controversial archaeological discoveries in the world, the Kennewick Man---a Caucasoid male mummy dating back more than 9,000 years---found in the Pacific Northwest on the banks of the Columbia River. A white man in North America more than 9,000 years ago? What was he doing there? With the terrifying grandeur of melting glaciers as a backdrop, People of the Raven shows animals and humans struggling for survival amidst massive environmental change. Mammoths, mastodons, and giant lions have become extinct, and Rain Bear, the chief of Sandy Point Village, knows his struggling Raven People may be next. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Daughters of the Bear is an anthology of non-fiction by 53 Korean women such as a shopkeeper in Itaewon, a doctor in Apkujong, a musician in Myong-Dong, a housewife in Chamshil, and a student at Ewha Womans University. Shiver with a merchant as she recollects escaping with her sisters and mother across the 38th Parallel in a rowboat under Russian gunfire; share with a young professional her secret wedding to a coworker; and walk along the paths between green carpeted barley fields toward a woman's childhood home. Through their stories, Korean women of different generations explore family, sacrifice, memories, relationships, sexuality, society's expectations and constraints, education, and the search for fulfillment and identity. The book includes a foreword by Chang Pilwha and translations by Young-Oak Wells, Professor Kenneth Wells and Brother Anthony of Taizé. For additional information on the editors and their publications visit www.daughtersofthebear.com.
It is a time of fire. A small band of pioneers struggle valiantly to keep their ancestors' dreams alive in an unforgiving, drought-stricken land. Driven by the promise of an awesome vision, a heroic young dreamer and a fearless woman warrior unite to lead their people to a magnificent destiny. A towering epic filled with tragedy and triumph, courage and conflict, People of the Fire is the second compelling novel in a majestic saga of America's first peoples. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
The moon had reached its maximum three times since the Chacoans conquered the First Moon People. The Chaco matrons had built their Great House high atop First Moon Mountain, and their warriors stalked arrogantly through the villages, taking what they pleased. But the gods can only stand so much human arrogance. Cold Bringing Woman, the goddess of winter, calls upon young Ripple to embark on a perilous quest to destroy the hated Chacoans. But Ripple will not face the task alone; he is aided by his stalwart friends: Wrapped Wrist, a short lothario; Spots, scarred at birth, and aide to the frightening witch, Nightshade; and Bad Cast, a simple family man, who will do anything to free his people. But the blessed matrons will brook no insurgency. In retaliation, war chief Leather Hand and his warriors embark on a campaign of terror so gruesome it remains unrivaled in the annals of prehistory. It all comes to a climax atop the mountain we now know as Chimney Rock. In the white light of the lunar maximum, the Pueblo gods will dance—and an empire will be engulfed in flames and mayhem. From New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear, People of the Moon is a story of North America's Forgotten Past—the battles fought, the heroes made, and the cultures that thrived in America's prehistory. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Masterly American novelist at the height of her powers with a 1930s story inspired by the real-life Christopher Robin. In the outskirts of the Bronx in 1930s New York, the Mitwisser clan are German refugees who survive at the whim of their vagabond benefactor, James A'Bair. James is heir to the fortune amassed by his father, the author of a wildly popular series of children's books called The Bear Boy. Into their chaotic household comes Rose Meadows, orphaned at the age of eighteen. Employed as an assistant to the eccentric Professor Mitwisser, Rose's position within the family is precarious, especially when the arrival of James threatens the fragile balance of the household.

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