On the eve of the revolution in Iran, Chloe Fowler, alone after the unexpected departure of her doctor husband, finds herself in a country undergoing violent change where everyone suspects everyone of something
The follow-up to The Arabian Nights Reader, this volume investigates the transnational features of the Arabian Nights.
Fresh insights, lively teaching and learning methods, and down-to-earth applications. These courses combine Bible study with dynamic learning activities and daily devotions. Prime-Time courses can be used to form a solid Bible study core for one or more years. This new look at the dramatic book of Esther uses the reader's theater approach to help students "live into" the story and relate it to their own experiences.
Understanding Diane Johnson is a biographical and critical study of a quintessential American novelist who has devoted forty-five years to writing about French and American culture. Johnson, who was nominated for the National Book Award three times and the Pulitzer Prize twice, has been a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books since the 1970s and is the author of more than a dozen fiction and nonfiction volumes. Carolyn A. Durham explores Johnson's fiction and nonfiction works, emphasizing that setting is key to the construction of Johnson's literary world, a theme displayed throughout her eleven novels. Johnson is well known as a comic novelist who addresses serious social problems. Durham outlines Johnson's continued exploration of women's lives and her experimentation with varied forms of narrative technique and genre parody in the detective novels The Shadow Knows and Lying Low, both award-winning novels. Durham examines Johnson's reinvention of the international novel of manners—inherited from Henry James and Edith Wharton—in her best-selling Franco-American trilogy: Le Divorce, Le Mariage, and L'Affaire. As the first book-length study of this distinguished American writer, Understanding Diane Johnson surveys an extensive body of work and draws critical attention to a well-published, widely read author who was the winner of the California Book Awards Gold Medal for Fiction in 1997.
Providing a broad ranging and unique comparative study of the development of English, Persian and Arabic literature, this book looks at their interrelations with specific reference to modernity, nationalism and social value. It gives a strong theoretical underpinning to the development of Middle Eastern literature in the modern period.
The tales with which Sheherazade nightly postpones the murderous intent of the Sultan Schahriar have entered our language and our lives like no other collection before or since. This, the only edition to include the complete text of the earliest English translation of the Nights, also offers extensive textual apparatus such as explanatory notes and plot summaries to help readers follow the complex and interwoven stories. - ;No other edition offers extensive textual apparatus such as explanatory notes, plot summaries, particularly vital as stories are complex and interwoven. The Sultan Schahriar's misguided resolution to shelter himself from the possible infidelities on his wives leads to an outbreak of barbarity in his kingdoms and a reign of terror in his court, stopped only by the resourceful Scheherazade. The tales with which Scheherazade nightly postpones the muderous intent of the sultan have entered our language and our lives like no other collection of narratives before or since. Sinbad, Aladdin, Ali Baba: all make their spectacular entrance on to the stage of English literary history in the Arabian Nights Entertainments (1704-17). The stories contained in this `store house of ingenious fiction' initiate a pattern of literary reference and influence which today remains as powerful and intense as it was throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This edition reproduces in its entirety the earliest English translation of the French orientalist Antoine Galland's Mille et une Nuits. This remained for over a century the only English translation of the story cycle, influencing an incalculable number of writers, and no other edition offers the complete text supplemented by full textual apparatus. -
1000 wild tulips A journey to the beach with multi-cultural “me-no-pausal” friends
A generous and erudite book...We’re in the company of someone who loves The Arabian Nights, and who has generously shared that love with us through this companion.' - Michele Roberts, Independent on Sunday 'Superlative...just the sort of relaxed, informative book that Edmund Wilson might have written had he grown interested in the Middle East and its early literature.' - Michael Dirda, Washington Post 'Irwin organizes his material like a good storyteller...he gives us the crystallized sum of The Nights: ancedote, history, moral fable, aphorism, story after story, wonder upon wonder. This monumental, infinitely faceted gem should be every writer's bedtime sampler.' - Michael Moorcock, New Statesman & Society 'A work both learned and witty...Robert Irwin has wonderfully deepened the pleasures and the interest in reading The Arabian Nights as a supreme work of imaginative fiction.' - Marina Warner,TLS
Ann von Lossberg and boyfriend Jim Hudock stand at the dock at Baltimore harbor and wave goodbye to their screaming-red VW bus en route to England--“just about the most beautiful magic carpet I’ve ever seen,” Ann says. Quitting their jobs and selling their possessions, they travel around the world with no fixed itinerary—presuming that their odyssey will be no less magical than Ali Baba’s classical odyssey. The first overland trip, two and a half years, is to the Middle East and Africa; a second trip to Asia is thirteen months. “Extended travel peels away the layers of your former self, especially the demands of Africa,” Ann says. “Something happens when you give up wearing a watch and relinquish control over time. Experience found us; extraordinary things that just don’t happen to people happened to us. We learned to leap, and the net always appeared.” The language that filled Ann’s journals, seasoning over twenty-five years’ time to become the sixteen stories of 1089 Nights, gives way to something rich and transcendent. A sympathetic storyteller with a keen eye—most commonly the lone woman traveler among men—Ann provides us with an armchair view of the world without the mosquitoes. From Syria to Mozambique to Cambodia, over and over, this heartening memoir shows us that the world is a wondrous place, that travel can change us, satisfy something soulful, and promote the most personal kind of peace. 1089 Nights is a passionate love affair with the world that carries an urgent plea. “The world passes us by faster than we know. If we don’t catch it soon, the airwaves will immutably wash over us in the same likeness. We will become as one.” “Hurry,” Ann says, “the camels are waiting.”
Oscar Wilde and Modern Culture: The Making of a Legend explores the meteoric rise, sudden fall, and legendary resurgence of an immensely influential writer’s reputation from his hectic 1881 American lecture tour to recent Hollywood adaptations of his dramas. Always renowned—if not notorious—for his fashionable persona, Wilde courted celebrity at an early age. Later, he came to prominence as one of the most talented essayists and fiction writers of his time. In the years leading up to his two-year imprisonment, Wilde stood among the foremost dramatists in London. But after he was sent down for committing acts of “gross indecency” it seemed likely that social embarrassment would inflict irreparable damage to his legacy. As this volume shows, Wilde died in comparative obscurity. Little could he have realized that in five years his name would come back into popular circulation thanks to the success of Richard Strauss’s opera Salome and Robert Ross’s edition of De Profundi. With each succeeding decade, the twentieth century continued to honor Wilde’s name by keeping his plays in repertory, producing dramas about his life, adapting his works for film, and devising countless biographical and critical studies of his writings. This volume reveals why, more than a hundred years after his demise, Wilde’s value in the academic world, the auction house, and the entertainment industry stands higher than that of any modern writer.
Iranian family embroiled in Islamic revolution, the hostage crisis, incest, and exile in America.

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