Play It Again, Sam is a timely investigation of a topic that until now has received almost no critical attention in film and cultural studies: the cinematic remake. As cinema enters its second century, more remakes are appearing than ever before, and these writers consider the full range: Hollywood films that have been recycled by Hollywood, such as The Jazz Singer, Cape Fear, and Robin Hood; foreign films including Breathless; and Three Men and a Baby, which Hollywood has reworked for American audiences; and foreign films based on American works, among them Yugoslav director Emir Kusturica's Time of the Gypsies, which is a "makeover" of Coppola's Godfather films. As these essays demonstrate, films are remade by other films (Alfred Hitchcock went so far as to remake his own The Man Who Knew Too Much) and by other media as well. The editors and contributors draw upon narrative, film, and cultural theories, and consider gender, genre, and psychological issues, presenting the "remake" as a special artistic form of repetition with a difference and as a commercial product aimed at profits in the marketplace. The remake flourishes at the crossroads of the old and the new, the known and the unknown. Play It Again, Sam takes the reader on an eye-opening tour of this hitherto unexplored territory. Play It Again, Sam is a timely investigation of a topic that until now has received almost no critical attention in film and cultural studies: the cinematic remake. As cinema enters its second century, more remakes are appearing than ever before, and these writers consider the full range: Hollywood films that have been recycled by Hollywood, such as The Jazz Singer, Cape Fear, and Robin Hood; foreign films including Breathless; and Three Men and a Baby, which Hollywood has reworked for American audiences; and foreign films based on American works, among them Yugoslav director Emir Kusturica's Time of the Gypsies, which is a "makeover" of Coppola's Godfather films. As these essays demonstrate, films are remade by other films (Alfred Hitchcock went so far as to remake his own The Man Who Knew Too Much) and by other media as well. The editors and contributors draw upon narrative, film, and cultural theories, and consider gender, genre, and psychological issues, presenting the "remake" as a special artistic form of repetition with a difference and as a commercial product aimed at profits in the marketplace. The remake flourishes at the crossroads of the old and the new, the known and the unknown. Play It Again, Sam takes the reader on an eye-opening tour of this hitherto unexplored territory.
Comedy Characters: 3 male, 8 female Interior Set Allan Felix has this thing about Humphrey Bogart. If only he had some of Bogart's technique... Bookish and insecure with women, Allan's hero, Bogey comes to the rescue, with a fantastic bevy of beauties played out in hilarious fantasy sequences. Fixed up by friends with gorgeous women, he's so awkward that even Bogey's patience is tried. Allan mostly resembles a disheveled, friendly dog and this is what ultimately charms his best friend's wife, Linda into bed. It's a tough life, making it in the world of beautiful people but if you can't be a hero it helps to have one... "Hilarious...a cheerful romp. Not only are Mr. Allen's jokes and their follow ups, asides and twists audaciously brilliant, but he has a great sense of character."-The New York Times "A funny, likeable comedy that has a surprising amount of wistful appeal."-New York Post
Chronicling the journey of ninety-year-old Sam Massell, each chapter is a book unto itself on the separate parts of his life. He has excelled in four careers, including twenty years in commercial real estate, twenty-two years in elected offices, thirteen years in the tourism industry, and is now in his thirtieth year of association management. In 1969, Sam Massell was elected the first Jewish mayor of Atlanta, Georgia. Since leaving office he has been inducted into numerous "Halls of Fame" for service in fields of business, government, civil rights, hospitality, and influence. When a young boy, and self-described "dead-end kid," Massell searched for identity between the mischief of his only two friends-one who ended up in juvenile detention-and operating his own oversized Coca-Cola stand. Later, he pioneered professionally as a specialist in building medical offices, struggled between pride and prejudice for being Jewish, and as a liberal Democrat, organized and managed a nonprofit civic group among one hundred (mostly) conservative Republican business leaders. Politically, Massell changed Atlanta's City elections to nonpartisan, created Atlanta's Urban Design Commission, allowed Muhammad Ali to fight when fifty other cities would not, established Metro Atlanta's mass transit system (MARTA), appointed the first woman to the City Council, named the first blacks to City department head status, and developed the Omni, Atlanta's first enclosed arena. Most importantly, his legacy will be his peaceful guidance of Atlanta (then population 500,000) through its transformation from an all-white power structure to a black city government. This is a textbook case of behind-the-scenes fact and frivolity of the sins of a workaholic and the success of an idea man, a leader, and the subject of a well-written history.
A bearded collie-turned-matchmaker named Sam fetches some romance for his sweet mistress, Phillippa "Pippa" Morgan, in the form of a handsome viscount ready to play Bogey to Pippa's Bacall. By the author of The Emperor's New Clothes. Original.
Some people are achievers for whom adventure is accomplished early in their lives. Perhaps they play sport to a high level be it playing rugby for England or scoring a hat-trick against Manchester United, moments for which they are rightly proud. Others serve time in the forces emerging with a tales of travel, achievements, moments of mischief and occasionally disaster. Mountaineers dream of climbing the highest mountains. I was none of these and my adventures had been modest at best despite living a happy and full life but learning to fly at a later time in my life became the opportunity and inspiration for this adventure. This is the story of realising my dream of adventure at the "young" age of seventy one, joining a group of intrepid aviators to fly from London to Cape Town in our single engine aircraft. We would fly down the picturesque East Coast of Africa and return by the more scary West Coast route traversing the thunderstorm belt at the equator both on the outbound and return journeys. The journey was not helped by the arrival of the Arab Spring uprising just as we were crossing North Africa. The two months, that our journey took, were exhilarating, challenging, frustrating, relaxing and extremely hard work in roughly equal measures. We learnt that things rarely go to plan in Africa as suggested by the oft quoted response to problems of "TIA" - "This is Africa". I hope that you will enjoy my tale of succeeding against the odds, marvelling at the sights and people of Africa as well as sharing our flying safari with you from the comfort of your armchair.
Sam Schoenfeld was a basketball wizard! He was one of the most outstanding basketball players of his generation, and was compared favorably to Nat Holman, who was considered the very best. He became one of the top high school basketball coaches in New York City history, and then went on to become one of the best college basketball officials as well. This book details the unlimited passion that Sam had for the game of basketball and of his impressive contributions and achievements in it. The reader is taken along for an exciting ride through the short but full life of an extraordinary man!
When her husband comes home from work one day to announce he's moving out, Samantha Rutgers thinks it's a joke. She hopes it's a joke. It's not. He packs his suitcase and moves out. For twenty-five years, Sam was a corporate wife, a stay-at-home mom. Now she's divorced, adrift, and alienated from her daughter who blames her for the divorce. Ill equipped to be a single woman in a whole new dating culture, she would have foundered without help from an old friend who challenges her to finish up the art degree she put on hold when she married. Her classes open the door to a job at an advertising agency, where Sam makes several new friends and one enemy. There she meets Frank Reynolds, who invites her to take that first step into new love. Gradually, as she slowly builds a new life for herself, Sam learns how to stand strong in the face of adversity, personal and professional.
Für Journalisten ist er ein Star: Alan Rusbridger, seit 20 Jahren Chefredakteur des britischen Guardian, hat seine Zeitung zum führenden kritischen englischsprachigen Blatt gemacht, auf beiden Seiten des Atlantik. Und er hat wie kein zweiter in der Branche die revolutionären Herausforderungen des Internet angenommen. Im vergangenen Jahr erhielt Rusbridger zusammen mit dem Enthüller der amerikanischen Geheimdienstpraktiken Edward Snowden den alternativen Nobelpreis für seine unerschrockene Aufklärungsarbeit im öffentlichen Interesse. Doch es gibt noch eine ganz andere Seite des hochdekorierten Journalisten: der Klavierspieler Rusbridger, der sich seinem Instrument mit ähnlicher Hingabe verschrieben hat, wie dem Kampf gegen staatliche Willkür. Als er während eines Workshops in Frankreich einen Hobby-Pianisten Chopins Ballade Nr. 1 spielen hört, packt ihn der Ehrgeiz. Ein Jahr lang übt er jeden Tag 20 Minuten lang das Furcht einflößende Stück, das zu den schwierigsten des Repertoires gehört. In seinem Buch nimmt Rusbridger uns mit an die Grenzen dessen, was ein Freizeit-Musiker an Fingerfertigkeit, Konzentration, Beherrschung und Musikalität erreichen kann. Wir erfahren, was Pianisten wie Murray Perahia, Richard Goode, Emanuel Ax, Daniel Barenboim, Stephen Hough and Alfred Brendel ihm raten, wie Musikhistoriker und -theoretiker ihn anspornen und Neurowissenschaftler ihm auf ganz andere Weise erklären, was Klavierspielen eigentlich ist. Gleichzeitig sind wir dabei, wie Rusbridger in Tripolis während des Bürgerkrieges in Libyen Reporter aus Geiselhaft befreit, wie er eine komplizierte Partnerschaft mit dem eigenwilligen WikiLeaks-Gründer Julian Assange, der New York Times und dem deutschen Spiegel managt und wie er den Telefon-Abhörskandal des britischen Magazins News of the World an die Öffentlichkeit bringt.
Bug Club Lime Plus books give high attaining children age-appropriate fiction and non-fiction stories which help them to work at greater depth, and allow you to measure their reading progress.
This comprehensive guide covers all of the music used in Woody Allen's films from Take the Money and Run (1969) to Match Point (2005). Each film receives scene-by-scene analysis with a focus on how Allen utilized music.
For three decades, no American filmmaker has been as prolific -- or as paradoxical -- as Woody Allen. From Play It Again, Sam (1972) through Celebrity (1998) and Sweet and Lowdown (1999), Allen has produced an average of one film a year, yet in many of these films Allen reveals a progressively skeptical attitude toward both the value of art and the cultural contributions of artists. In examining Allen's filmmaking career, The Reluctant Film Art of Woody Allen demonstrates that his movies often question whether the projected illusions of magicians/artists benefit audience or artists. Other Allen films dramatize the opposed conviction that the consoling, life-redeeming illusions of art are the best solution humanity has devised to the existential dilemma of being a death-foreseeing animal. Peter Bailey demonstrates how Allen's films repeatedly revisit and reconfigure this tension between image and reality, art and life, fabrication and factuality, with each film reaching provisional resolutions that a subsequent movie will revise. Merging criticism and biography, Bailey identifies Allen's ambivalent views of the artistic enterprise as a key to understanding his entire filmmaking career. Because of its focus upon filmmaker Sandy Bates's conflict between entertaining audiences and confronting them with bleak human actualities, Stardust Memories is a central focus of the book. Bailey's examination of Allen's art/life dialectic also draws from the off screen drama of Allen's very public separation from Mia Farrow, and the book accordingly construes such post-scandal films as Bullets Over Broadway and Mighty Aphrodite as Allen's oblique cinematic responses to that tabloid tempest. By illuminating the thematic conflict at the heart of Allen's work, Bailey seeks not only to clarify the aesthetic designs of individual Allen films but to demonstrate how his oeuvre enacts an ongoing debate the screenwriter/director has been conducting with himself between creating cinematic narratives affirming the saving powers of the human imagination and making films acknowledging the irresolvably dark truths of the human condition.

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