This is the first complete version in English of the "Book of the People" of the Quiche Maya, the most powerful nation of the Guatemalan highlands in pre-Conquest times and a branch of the ancient Maya, whose remarkable civilization in pre-Columbian America is in many ways comparable to the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean. Generally regarded as America's oldest book, the Popol Vuh, in fact, corresponds to our Christian Bible, and it is, moreover, the most important of the five pieces of the great library treasures of the Maya that survived the Spanish Conquest. The Popol Vuh was first transcribed in the Quiche language, ·but in Latin characters, in the middle of the sixteenth century, by some unknown but highly literate Quiche Maya Indian-probably from the oral traditions of his people. This now lost manuscript was copied at the end of the seventeenth century by Father Francisco Ximénez, then parish priest of the village of Santo Tomás Chichicastenango in the highlands of Guatemala, today the most celebrated and best-known Indian town in all of Central America. The mythology, traditions, cosmogony, and history of the Quiché Maya, including the chronology of their kings down to 1550, are related in simple yet literary style by the Indian chronicler. And Adrian Recinos has made a valuable contribution to the understanding and enjoyment of the document through his thorough going introduction and his identification of places and people in the footnotes.
Author Stephen Currie provides readers with an intriguing look at the mythology of the Mayan culture. He explains how the beliefs, values, and experiences of that culture are represented in its treasured stories. Topics covered include creation stories, myths of culture heroes such as the Hero Twins, and tales of the gods of maize, rain, and wind, as well as the malevolent spirits of the underworld, Xilbaba. This volume has a map of the Mayan civilization, a genealogy grid for the Hero Twins, a table of major characters with name pronunciations and brief descriptions, a glossary, sidebars, fact boxes, a bibliography of sources for further study, and a subject index.
In a book framed as fictional dialogue between a modern Mayan father and son, a Mayan author turns to the Mayan belief system to provide strategies for surviving and thriving in the year of 2012, which some believe will bring about radical cultural and spiritual change. Original.
The Popol Vuh is the most important example of Maya literature to have survived the Spanish conquest. It is also one of the world’s great creation accounts, comparable to the beauty and power of Genesis. Most previous translations have relied on Spanish versions rather than the original K’iche’-Maya text. Based on ten years of research by a leading scholar of Maya literature, this translation with extensive notes is uniquely faithful to the original language. Retaining the poetic style of the original text, the translation is also remarkably accessible to English readers. Illustrated with more than eighty drawings, photographs, and maps, Allen J. Christenson’s authoritative version brings out the richness and elegance of this sublime work of literature, comparable to such epic masterpieces as the Ramayana and Mahabharata of India or the Iliad and Odyssey of Greece.
Dennis Tedlock presents startling new methods for transcribing, translating, and interpreting oral performance that carry wide implications for all areas of the spoken arts. Moreover, he reveals how the categories and concepts of poetics and hermeneutics based in Western literary traditions cannot be carried over in their entirety to the spoken arts of other cultures but require extensive reevaluation.
Popol Vuh, the Quiché Mayan book of creation is not only the most important text in the native language of the Americas, it is also an extraordinary document of the human imagination. It begins with the deeds of Mayan Gods in the darkness of a primeval sea and ends with the radiant splendor of the Mayan Lords who founded the Quiché Kingdom in the Guatemalan highlands. Originally written in Mayan hieroglyphs, it was translated into the Roman alphabet in the 16th century. The new edition of Dennis Tedlock's unabridged, widely praised translation includes new notes and commentary, newly translated passages, newly deciphered hieroglyphs, and over 40 new illustrations.
Jesus Christ Visited Ancient America By Almon Fackrell ." . . And other sheep I have, which are not of this fold: them also I must bring, and they shall hear my voice . . ." (John 10:14-16) The Bible, being the most revered book of the Christians, along with the collected treasures of Mayan and Aztec antiquities, testifies: Jesus Christ Visited Ancient America. Being an enthusiast of Bible versions, and after visiting the Aztec and Mayan ruins in Mexico, Almon Fackrell was prompted to have this study and reveal the parallels of Christian belief and Ancient America's religion. With it, Almon Fackrell was able to account for 276 similarities, which prove that Israelites were in Ancient America! Discover for yourself the facts that have been written both in the Bible and the Popol Vuh. About the Author Almon Fackrell was born in Pingree, Idaho and raised in Arimo, Idaho. In 1953, he was drafted into the U.S. Army and was assigned to a Special Weapons Detachment in New Mexico at Sandia Base, Holloman Air Force Base and White Sands Proving Grounds. He attended the University of New Mexico and graduated at Sandia Corporation Engineering Trade School in Albuquerque. After thirty-seven years of drafting, designing, and engineering in the Aerospace Industry, he retired as a senior support engineer from Parker Hannifin Corporation in Irvine, California.
Includes three bonus chapters on Mythology and Religion of Ancient Mexico. When the Spanish took over Central America in the 16th and 17th centuries they destroyed the writings and holy books of the native Mayans in an effort to convert them to Christianity. Few texts survived, yet one did. It is called The Popol Vuh, the creation story of the Mayan culture. This was the first English rendering of that text. Tells the story of a great flood, gods who created mankind, and a number of other interesting parallels to mythologies from around the world. All of the gods and deities are fully explained and at times compared to those from Greece, Rome and Egypt. A fascinating collection of mythology from Central America and Mexico.
An analysis of the oldest form of poetry. Sumer, in the southern part of Iraq, created the first literary culture in history, as early as 2500BC. The account is structured around a complete English translation of the fragmentary Lugalbanda poems, narrating the adventures of the eponymous hero. The study reveals a work of a rich and sophisticated poetic imagination and technique, which, far from being in any sense 'primitive', are so complex as to resist much modern literary analysis.>

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