WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MARK HADDON In Postcard From The Past, Tom Jackson has gathered a collection of the funniest, weirdest and most moving real messages from the backs of old postcards. 'Sublimely funny' Jason Hazeley, author of the Ladybird Books for Grown Ups 'My favourite Twitter account is now my favourite book. Irresistible!' Jill Mansell 'This book is an absolute treat' Holly Walsh 'Transfixing, beguiling, warmly haunting. These are the ghosts of a childhood' Robin Ince 'A hilarious and occasionally disturbing look at how the British remain resolutely small-minded wherever they go' Charlie Higson 'Six by four inch portions of pure heaven' Rachel Johnson 'Somehow both poignant and deeply creepy' Samira Ahmed 'One of Twitter's most nourishing concepts - each one arriving like a bonsai Alan Bennett play' Danny Baker 'Beautiful. Inspiring. Educational. Hilarious' Emma Freud 'One of the saddest and funniest picture books you're ever likely to read' Owen Hatherley, author of The Ministry of Nostalgia 'Hilarious, haunting, silly, poetic and profound' Danny Wallace 'A book of rare and genuine beauty' James O'Brien, LBC
Siblings Billa and Ed, who share their beautiful, grand old childhood home in rural Cornwall, find their comfortable existence shattered by the arrival of threatening postcards from a past enemy who has resurfaced, stirring up old and painful memories.
City of Vancouver Heritage award winner, 2003 Postcards From The Past provides a nostalgic and enlightening glimpse of Vancouver and surrounding environs during its first great decade of growth, years now known as the Edwardian Era. Authors Fred Thirkell and Bob Scullion have presented a collection of outstanding postcard images, complemented by historical anecdotes and amusing asides. Complete with maps showing the sites of the original photos, this collection allows readers to gain a new perspective of a grand time and a magnificent place.
** THE NEW YORK TIMES-BESTSELLING CULT CLASSIC NOVEL ** ** In a new edition introduced by Stephen Fry ** ‘I don’t think you can even call this a drug. This is just a response to the conditions we live in.’ Suzanne Vale, formerly acclaimed actress, is in rehab, feeling like ‘something on the bottom of someone’s shoe, and not even someone interesting’. Immersed in the sometimes harrowing, often hilarious goings-on of the drug hospital and wondering how she’ll cope – and find work – back on the outside, she meets new patient Alex. Ambitious, good-looking in a Heathcliffish way and in the grip of a monumental addiction, he makes Suzanne realize that, however eccentric her life might seem, there’s always someone who’s even closer to the edge of reason. Carrie Fisher’s bestselling debut novel is an uproarious commentary on Hollywood – the home of success, sex and insecurity – and has become a beloved cult classic. ‘This novel, with its energy, bounce and generous delivery of a loud laugh on almost every page, stands as a declaration of war on two fronts: on normal and on unhappy’ STEPHEN FRY ‘A single woman’s answer to Nora Ephron’s Heartburn . . . the smart successor to Joan Didion’s Play It as It Lays’ Los Angeles Times ‘A cult classic . . . A wonderfully funny, brash and biting novel’ Washington Post 'A wickedly shrewd black-humor riff on the horrors of rehab and the hollows of Hollywood life' People 'Searingly funny' Vogue
Take a nostalgic trip to the Grand Canyon with reproductions of 20 vintage post cards originally sold in and around the park. Full color.
Olivia Mott finds herself juggling two jobs: her assistant chef position at Hotel Florence and her undercover work for the Pullman Rail Car Company. Olivia thinks the suggestions she relays to Pullman's town manager are being used to improve conditions for workers and save the company money, but is something much more sinister happening behind the scenes? Several months have passed since Lady Charlotte fled to Chicago, leaving her infant son in Olivia's care. Now Charlotte's money has run out. A kindly woman offers her a place to live and secures her a position at Marshall Field's store, but Charlotte's heart can't forget the past. Dare she return to Pullman to find out what happened to her baby?
A collection of 100 postcards, each featuring a different and iconic Penguin book jacket. From classics to crime, here are over seventy years of quintessentially British design in one box. In 1935 Allen Lane stood on a platform at Exeter railway station, looking for a good book for the journey to London. His disappointment at the poor range of paperbacks on offer led him to found Penguin Books. The quality paperback had arrived. Declaring that 'good design is no more expensive than bad', Lane was adamant that his Penguin paperbacks should cost no more than a packet of cigarettes, but that they should always look distinctive. Ever since then, from their original - now world-famous - look featuring three bold horizontal stripes, through many different stylish, inventive and iconic cover designs, Penguin's paperback jackets have been a constantly evolving part of Britain's culture. And whether they're for classics, crime, reference or prize-winning novels, they still follow Allen Lane's original design mantra. Sometimes, you definitely should judge a book by its cover.
Listening to Auschwitz -- Picturing the camps -- Warsaw -- Berlin -- Jerusalem -- Washington, D.C
* The first book on the subject of postcards in the Indian subcontinent* More than 500 professionally restored images* Chapters dedicated to cities and movementsPostcards were to people in 1900 what the Internet was to the world in 2000. The world went from a thousand to a billion postcards in a very short span of time, with the finest painters from India, Austria and Japan getting involved.Paper Jewels is the story of postcards during the Raj, and covers India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Burma. It is the first book on the subject and features hundreds of professionally-restored images in original format, weaving together the postcard artists, photographers, and publishers who define the rich history of the medium. The author's research also charts the history and progression of the technological aspects of postcard publishing and its key players. The concluding chapters explore the role postcards played in the Independence struggle, from the First Non-Cooperation Movement through the Dandi March and Partition. It includes some of the earliest cards of Mahatma Gandhi, Mohammed Ali Jinnah and other political figures. Many of the images in the book have not been seen since they were first published nearly a century ago. Published in association with The Alkazi Collection of Photography.
Follows Michael's summer at sleep-away camp through a series of postcards sent between him and his father.
Introducing 100 postcards of all Doctor Who's iconic characters, terrifying monsters and incredible places the Doctor has visited, all packed in a stylish keepsake box. Send them to your friends, stick them on your wall, or keep them as a classic collectable!
Catriona Lydgate is a housewife with two children and an adoring husband. But beneath the surface of her seemingly perfect life are the dark secrets of the past she's tried to forget. Disturbing postcards begin arriving in the mail; she is recognized by a man who knew her from her past-an avalanche of small moments that will threaten everything she thought was real. When her youngest daughter falls ill with a mysterious illness, the doctors and even her husband suspect that she is deliberately making her child sick.As her marriage unravels, she comes dangerously close to the edge-and to losing everything that she loves-as the past she has fought so hard to bury becomes her witness and prosecutor.This is a haunting, heartbreaking novel-domestic fiction at its very finest.
A pictorial history of Detroit through postcards.
At her father's funeral, Melissa makes a shocking discovery that will send her on a journey across continents and into her family's hidden past… 2002, Australia. When Melissa discovers a postcard addressed to 'Desmond' among her recently deceased father's effects, she is determined to discover this person's identity and his relationship to her father. She soon embarks on a journey that will take her across oceans and into the past… 1930's, London. Caroline grew on a secluded Scottish estate with her 'Aunt' Phoebe. Now, the shocking realisation that Phoebe is actually her mother fuels a rebellious streak in Caroline, who elopes to Cairo to get married. But her marriage quickly turns sour and leads to an affair with an old lover, and to a baby boy, Desmond. With her personal life in tatters and WWII approaching, she volunteers as a secret agent, smuggling valuable information into Europe for the British government. When Caroline finally returns from the war, Desmond is gone; he was secretly taken to Australia by his nanny years before. Will Caroline be able to track him down? And how will her journey to find her son lead to Melissa's mission to uncover her father's past? Praise forThe Captain's Daughter: 'A born storyteller' Kate Atkinson 'I enjoyed it enormously. It's a moving and compelling story about a lifetime's journey in search of the truth' Rachel Hore
Seventeen-year-old Jacob Todd is about to discover himself. Jacob's plan is to go to Amsterdam to honor his grandfather who died during World War II. He expects to go, set flowers on his grandfather's tombstone, and explore the city. But nothing goes as planned. Jacob isn't prepared for love&150or to face questions about his sexuality. Most of all, he isn't prepared to hear what Geertrui, the woman who nursed his grandfather during the war, has to say about their relationship. Geertrui was always known as Jacob's grandfather's kind and generous nurse. But it seems that in the midst of terrible danger, Geertrui and Jacob's grandfather's time together blossomed into something more than a girl caring for a wounded soldier. And like Jacob, Geertrui was not prepared. Geertrui and Jacob live worlds apart, but their voices blend together to tell one story&150a story that transcends time and place and war. By turns moving, vulnerable, and thrilling, this extraordinary novel takes the reader on a memorable voyage of discovery.
A secret lies buried at the heart of her family--but it can't stay hidden forever. When Cara stumbles across a stash of old postcards in the attic, their contents make her question everything she thought she knew. The story she pieces together is confusing and unsettling, and appears to have been patched over with lies. But who can tell her the truth? With her father sinking into Alzheimer's and her brother reluctant to help, it seems Cara will never find the answers to her questions. One thing is clear, though: someone knows more than they're letting on. Torn between loyalty to her family and dread of what she might find, Cara digs into the early years of her parents' troubled marriage, hunting down long-lost relatives who might help unravel the mystery. But the picture that begins to emerge is not at all the one she'd expected--because as she soon discovers, lies have a habit of multiplying . . . Revised edition: This edition of Postcards from a Stranger includes editorial revisions.
Joanna’s mother just died, the FBI wants her to get a psychiatric evaluation, undocumented Chinese immigrants have taken over her apartment building, her lover hooks up with her best friend, and the country is being run by lunatics. Joanna clings to sanity by writing about her childhood, but plunging back into her tumultuous past only adds chaos to her life.
Brutalist hotels, avant-garde monuments and futurist TV towers: rare and previously unpublished vintage postcards from the Eastern Bloc Brutal concrete hotels, futurist TV towers, heroic statues of workers--this collection of Soviet-era postcards documents the uncompromising landscape of the Eastern Bloc through its buildings and monuments. These are interspersed with quotes from prominent figures of the time, which both support and confound the ideologies presented in the images. In contrast to the photographs of a ruined and abandoned Soviet empire we are accustomed to seeing today, the scenes depicted here publicize the bright future of communism: social housing blocks, palaces of culture and monuments to comradeship. Dating from the 1960s to the 1980s, they offer a nostalgic yet revealing insight into social and architectural values of the time, acting as a window through which we can examine cars, people and, of course, buildings. These postcards, sanctioned by the authorities, were intended to show the world what living in communism looked like. Instead, this postcard propaganda inadvertently communicates other messages: outside the House of Political Enlightenment in Yerevan, the flowerbed reads "Glory to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union"; in Novopolotsk, art-school pupils paint plein air, their subject a housing estate; at the Irkutsk Polytechnic Institute students stroll past a 16-foot-tall concrete hammer and sickle. These postcards are at once sinister, funny, poignant and surreal.

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