Helps children understand mum's mental health difficulties around the time of having a new baby.
APPRAISAL AND REVALIDATION SERIES The new Appraisal and Revalidation Series helps doctors demonstrate their competence to the standard expected by the General Medical Council and to the standard expected if they are recognised as having 'special clinical interests'. It helps doctors gather evidence of their performance for appraisal and revalidation portfolios. This fifth book in the series examines the practical ways to identify learning and service needs within the areas of substance abuse palliative care musculoskeletal conditions and prescribing practice. It also provides guidance on how to collect data to demonstrate learning competence performance and service delivery standards. All general practitioners and those with special clinical interests and primary care organisation leads will find this book essential reading. For more information on other titles in this series please click here
Listening Visits in Perinatal Mental Health focuses on how women and families suffering from perinatal mental illness can be supported by a wide range of practitioners. Based on the skills of attentive listening, it is designed for use by health professionals and support workers concerned with maternal mental health and the mental health of the family. This accessible guide: Covers the process and progression of perinatal mental health Discusses the types of anxiety and depression which may occur during the perinatal period Examines the impact of maternal mental illness of the infant, father and family Explores the available assessment tools, such as the EPDS Presents the theories behind the efficacy of listening and counselling skills, as well as the evidence which recommends this type of therapy Gives suggestions of alternative therapeutic approaches and further resources to explore around perinatal mental health Emphasises the importance of looking after yourself and making use of supervision and peer support. With chapters focused on listening to mothers, fathers and infants and paying attention to cultural diversity, Listening Visits in Perinatal Mental Health builds on the knowledge that many professionals working with new mothers already have about perinatal mental health. It focuses on developing the skills needed to put this knowledge into practice and includes case examples and follow-up activities throughout.
This book draws together a wide range of current theories and research into a comprehensive framework for therapeutic interventions in women suffering depression following childbearing. The authors outline clinical guidelines and detailed intervention prodedures that have been found to be highly effective at reducing the symptoms of depression, improving maternal functioning and self-esteem, treating marital/partner issues, dealing with parent-infant difficulties and helping clients to maximise available support networks.
This book provides both trainees in perinatal psychiatry and the generalist who wishes to know more with an up-to-date overview of the subject. In addition, it is a useful resource for other professionals working in the field such as nurses, psychologists, obstetricians, midwives and health visitors. The chapters address historical and classification issues, the management of both new onset and existing mental disorders (including substance misuse) presenting in pregnancy and the postpartum period, prescribing and physical treatments during pregnancy and breast feeding. Also covered are issues for children and families, screening for and prevention of mental disorders in relation to childbirth, service provision and transcultural issues.
This is a comprehensive overview of mental health problems associated with pregnancy and the year after delivery. This is a core component of maternity care. The second edition has been updated to reflect current practice, recent evidence and new clinical guidelines. Topics include diagnosis and management and issues for children and families.
This title is directed primarily towards health care professionals outside of the United States. It takes a comprehensive look at the issues surrounding mental illness and pregnancy. Describing common disorders and their relationship with pregnancy, it promotes an understanding of the issues involved and offers tools to providing the most effective woman-centred maternity care. All health professionals concerned with the wellbeing of the pregnant woman will find invaluable help and guidance in this book. Given the identification of mental health problems as a leading cause of maternal death (CEMD 2001), this is an essential guide to the effects of pregnancy and childbirth on women and families coping with mental illness.
The past two decades have seen a convergence of findings across studies of traumatic stress, attachment, and neurobiology, confirming the crucial importance of well-being within the mother-infant dyad for life-long mental and physical health, and for reaching the fullest developmental potential. It is now established that there are intergenerational cycles of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric vulnerability that warrant a prevention approach. Pregnancy is a crucial point of intersection between generations. During pregnancy, women with a childhood maltreatment history have a 12-fold increased risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although awareness of the need for trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions is increasing in the fields of addiction and mental health treatment in particular, there are no front-line programmes for the childbearing year that address maltreatment-related PTSD. This edited collection addresses the issues of intergenerational cycles of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric vulnerability by providing a resource to facilitate incorporating trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions into maternity services with an emphasis on improving outcomes for childbearing women with a childhood maltreatment history.The book will prove of use to those training for or working in child protection and nursing.
Summarizing these recent advances in theory, research, and treatment, the book hypothesizes that the traditional categories of postpartum mood disorders -- postpartum "blues," postpartum depression and postpartum psychosis -- are not necessarily on a continuum.
Taking in many different perspectives, this book sheds light on the many aspects of postnatal depression in fathers - an unknown subject to many people. It includes a review of recent studies and research in this area, investigating the reasons behind male postnatal depression and how this can effect family relationships. It also examines the the social and psychoanalytic factors which go some way to explaining why men experience this depression as well as women. The book's author, Olivia Spencer, talks with Michel Odent, a renowned obstetrician, writer, and birth expert. Odent's controversial view that men should not be present at childbirth, and that their presence may indeed be a trigger for depression, are central to his discussion. Spencer also talks with Adam Jukes, a psychoanalyst with a wealth of experience in working with violent and angry men. Jukes gives fascinating insights into male behavior, explaining that we simply don't give men the resources they need to deal with a new baby. The book opens up a discussion of diagnosis and treatment through personal stories from both men and women affected by a father's postnatal depression. It will increase awareness of this under-discussed subject and will challenge preconceptions. *** "This book will certainly provide significant contributions to the field of childbirth education in the conventional, childbirth preparation, and labor and birth classes....Fathers involved in the pregnancy experience, even in a small way, can be encouraged to take the suggested surveys identified in this book. It will certainly increase the conversation on providing more resources for fathers who are unaware of, or are reluctant to talk about, suffering from PND." - International Journal of Childbirth Education, Vol. 30, No. 2, April 2015~
Perinatal Mental Health is an invaluable reference for nurses, midwives and other health professionals working with this client group, covering current thinking on the causes of mothers’ mood disorders and the consequences for her infant, the family, society and most importantly the mother herself. This book covers the recognition, treatment, care and management of perinatal mental health disorders with chapters on the antenatal period; postnatal depression and bipolar disorder; psychosis, personality disorders, eating disorders, sexual issues, self harm and suicide; possible causes of postnatal depression; the multidisciplinary team; and global cultural practices.
Keeping the Baby in Mind builds on the expanding evidence pointing to the crucial importance of parents in facilitating their baby’s development, and brings together expert contributors to examine a range of innovative psychological and psychotherapeutic interventions that are currently being used to support parents and their infants. It not only provides an overview of the many projects that are now available but also makes recommendations for future practice and the way in which children’s services are organised. The book brings together interventions and ways of working that can be used both universally to support parents during the transition to parenthood, and with high-risk groups of parents where for example there may be child protection concerns or parents experience severe mental health problems. Each chapter describes the evidence supporting the need for such interventions and the approach being developed, and concludes with a description of its evaluation. Keeping the Baby in Mind marks a new and exciting phase in the development of interventions to support infant mental health and will be of interest across a wide range of disciplines from primary and community care to early years and Children’s Centre settings.
Depression is a widespread condition affecting approximately 7.5 million parents in the U.S. each year and may be putting at least 15 million children at risk for adverse health outcomes. Based on evidentiary studies, major depression in either parent can interfere with parenting quality and increase the risk of children developing mental, behavioral and social problems. Depression in Parents, Parenting, and Children highlights disparities in the prevalence, identification, treatment, and prevention of parental depression among different sociodemographic populations. It also outlines strategies for effective intervention and identifies the need for a more interdisciplinary approach that takes biological, psychological, behavioral, interpersonal, and social contexts into consideration. A major challenge to the effective management of parental depression is developing a treatment and prevention strategy that can be introduced within a two-generation framework, conducive for parents and their children. Thus far, both the federal and state response to the problem has been fragmented, poorly funded, and lacking proper oversight. This study examines options for widespread implementation of best practices as well as strategies that can be effective in diverse service settings for diverse populations of children and their families. The delivery of adequate screening and successful detection and treatment of a depressive illness and prevention of its effects on parenting and the health of children is a formidable challenge to modern health care systems. This study offers seven solid recommendations designed to increase awareness about and remove barriers to care for both the depressed adult and prevention of effects in the child. The report will be of particular interest to federal health officers, mental and behavioral health providers in diverse parts of health care delivery systems, health policy staff, state legislators, and the general public.
This manual attempts to provide simple, adequate and evidence-based information to health care professionals in primary health care especially in low- and middle-income countries to be able to provide pharmacological treatment to persons with mental disorders. The manual contains basic principles of prescribing followed by chapters on medicines used in psychotic disorders; depressive disorders; bipolar disorders; generalised anxiety and sleep disorders; obsessive compulsive disorders and panic attacks; and alcohol and opioid dependence. The annexes provide information on evidence retrieval, assessment and synthesis and the peer view process.
It is well-known that having a baby can be a time of joy but also one of anxiety and even depression for new mothers. Indeed it is very common for new mothers to experience a short period of distress following childbirth, often referred to as 'baby blues'. Usually this passes quite quickly, however for more than 1 in 10 women, this distressing experience can be more prolonged. This practical self-help book based on Compassion Focused Therapy will help women to recognise some of the symptoms and, where appropriate, to normalise them, thereby alleviating their distress. It will also guide mothers-to-be and new mothers through the maze of confusing feelings that can arise. Not only will this book cover the basic experiences and symptoms associated with anxiety and depression and childbirth, an evolutionary model of why this occurs, and an outline of the basic Compassionate Mind model, it will guide the reader through a series of exercises that they can use for themselves to develop their compassionate mind and work on their difficulties.
Mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) is a term used to describe a wide range of actions that address social, psychological and psychiatric problems that are either pre-existing or emergency-induced. These actions are carried out in highly different contexts by organisations and people with different professional backgrounds, in different sectors and with different types of resources. All these different actors - and their donors - need practical assessments leading to recommendations that can be used immediately to improve people s mental health and well-being. Although a range of assessment tools exist, what has been missing is an overall approach that clarifies when to use which tool for what purpose. This document offers an approach to assessment that should help you review information that is already available and only collect new data that will be of practical use, depending on your capacity and the phase of the humanitarian crisis. This document is rooted in two policy documents, the IASC Reference Group s (2010) Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Humanitarian Emergencies: What Should Humanitarian Health Actors Know? and the Sphere Handbook s Standard on Mental Health (Sphere Project, 2011). This document is written primarily for public health actors. As the social determinants of mental health and psychosocial problems occur across sectors, half of the tools in the accompanying toolkit cover MHPSS assessment issues relevant to other sectors as well as the health sector. This document should help you to collect the necessary information to assist people affected by humanitarian crises more effectively.

Best Books