Discusses primate evolution, behavior, and classification, and provides detailed information and illustrations, arranged geographically, on every family and nearly three hundred species.
This illustrated guide takes a close look at every branch of the primate family around the world, from tiny nocturnal mouse lemurs in Madagascar, to graceful langurs in India and majestic gorillas in Africa.
This book shows you photographs or a drawing of every currently recognised taxon in the primate order with a synopsis of what is known about all 505 species. The information has been compiled by over 300 primatologists from around the world, who have done field research on their particular lemur, loris, galago, monkey, or ape in its natural habitat. The book illustrates these primates with over 1500 photographs and provides over 5000 references. You will be amazed by the diversity of the worlds primates, and it will inspire you to protect endangered primates and their habitats. Fifty percent of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to organisations working for the conservation of primates.
In 1987, the University of Chicago Press published Primate Societies, the standard reference in the field of primate behavior for an entire generation of students and scientists. But in the twenty-five years since its publication, new theories and research techniques for studying the Primate order have been developed, debated, and tested, forcing scientists to revise their understanding of our closest living relatives. Intended as a sequel to Primate Societies, The Evolution of Primate Societies compiles thirty-one chapters that review the current state of knowledge regarding the behavior of nonhuman primates. Chapters are written by the leading authorities in the field and organized around four major adaptive problems primates face as they strive to grow, maintain themselves, and reproduce in the wild. The inclusion of chapters on the behavior of humans at the end of each major section represents one particularly novel aspect of the book, and it will remind readers what we can learn about ourselves through research on nonhuman primates. The final section highlights some of the innovative and cutting-edge research designed to reveal the similarities and differences between nonhuman and human primate cognition. The Evolution of Primate Societies will be every bit the landmark publication its predecessor has been.
This comprehensive guide to primates of the world examines the evolutionary links and differences between primates, from tiny marmosets and bushbabies to massive gorillas-and us. The book is structured according to the four main branches of the primate family tree and contains expert information on the natural history, characteristics, and behavior of over 250 species, along with maps showing the range of the species. An introductory chapter presents the latest research on primatology, from conservation issues to evolution. Stunning photographs from primatologist Ian Redmond and colleagues, cladograms, and maps make this an essential guide to primates.
From Nigeria's needle-clawed bush baby to the snub-nosed langur of Tibet, Walker's guide includes scientific and common names, number and distribution of species, physical traits, habitat, daily and seasonal activity, population dynamics, home range, social life, reproduction, longevity, and status of threatened species. 179 photos.
Colombia is a one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world: although it takes up slightly less than one percent of the Earth's surface, it is home to approximately ten percent of the world's plants and animals, with a rich variety of flora and fauna and a diversity of primate species that is only superseded by Brazil and Peru in number. This vibrantly illustrated field guide is the result of a wealth of field work conducted on Colombian primates both in and out of the country. The volume illustrates and describes twenty-eight primate species comprising forty-three taxa, of which fifteen taxa are only found in Colombia. The field guide also includes comprehensive chapters on primate classification, fossil history, and conservation, and each is augmented by a wealth of finely detailed drawings, photographs, and maps. Primates of Colombia will be an invaluable resource for primatologists and naturalists alike.
Primate Societies is a synthesis of the most current information on primate socioecology and its theoretical and empirical significance, spanning the disciplines of behavioral biology, ecology, anthropology, and psychology. It is a very rich source of ideas about other taxa. "A superb synthesis of knowledge about the social lives of non-human primates."—Alan Dixson, Nature
The most complete and user-friendly photographic field guide to the world’s canids This stunningly illustrated and easy-to-use field guide covers every species of the world’s canids, from the Gray Wolf of North America to the dholes of Asia, from African jackals to the South American Bush Dog. It features more than 150 superb color plates depicting every kind of canid and detailed facing-page species accounts that describe key identification features, morphology, distribution, subspeciation, habitat, and conservation status in the wild. The book also includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species, making Canids of the World the most comprehensive and user-friendly guide to these intriguing and spectacular mammals. Covers every species and subspecies of canid Features more than 150 color plates with more than 600 photos from around the globe Depicts species in similar poses for quick and easy comparisons Describes key identification features, habitat, behavior, reproduction, and much more Draws on the latest taxonomic research Includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species The ideal field companion and a delight for armchair naturalists
An acclaimed illustrated guide to the world’s carnivores—now in an expanded and thoroughly updated new edition This is an expanded and fully revised new edition of a highly acclaimed guide to the world’s carnivores—some of the most spectacular and feared creatures in nature. Covering all 250 species of terrestrial, true carnivores, from the majestic polar bear and predatory wild cats to the tiny least weasel, Luke Hunter’s comprehensive, up-to-date, and user-friendly guide features 93 color plates by acclaimed wildlife artist Priscilla Barrett that depict every species and numerous subspecies, as well as more than 400 drawings of skulls and footprints. Features new to this edition include revised and expanded species coverage, a distribution map for every species, 25 new behavioral illustrations, and much more. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, distribution and habitat, feeding ecology, behavior, social patterns, reproduction and demography, status, threats, lifespan, and mortality. An introduction includes a concise overview of taxonomy, conservation, and the distinct families of Carnivora. Covers all 250 terrestrial carnivore species Includes 93 color plates by acclaimed wildlife artist Priscilla Barrett Packed with new features, including: Fully updated coverage, including new accounts of 9 recently delineated species 7 new color plates illustrating the new species and additional forms of existing species 185 distribution maps 25 new behavioral illustrations 16 new pages and larger format A double-page spread on canid hybrids The latest data on population trends and endangered status
Introduces members of the primate family, from monkeys and humans to whales,looking at their anatomy and physiology
Photography and science combine in an intimate depiction documenting the majestic presence of primates, spanning the globe and visiting their jungle habitats as well as documenting observations that capture the playful nature of the young and the affectionate bond between mother and child. Original. IP.
Bovids are a diverse group of ruminant mammals that have hooves and unbranched hollow horns. Bovids of the World is the first comprehensive field guide to cover all 279 bovid species, including antelopes, gazelles, cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats. From the hartebeest of Africa and the takin of Asia to the muskox of North America, bovids are among the world's most spectacular animals and this stunningly illustrated and easy-to-use field guide is an ideal way to learn more about them. The guide covers all species and subspecies of bovids described to date. It features more than 300 superb full-color plates depicting every kind of bovid, as well as detailed facing-page species accounts that describe key identification features, horn morphology, distribution, subspeciation, habitat, and conservation status in the wild. This book also shows where to observe each species and includes helpful distribution maps. Suitable for anyone with an interest in natural history, Bovids of the World is a remarkable and attractive reference, showcasing the range and beauty of these important mammals. The first comprehensive field guide to all 279 bovid species 337 full-color plates, with more than 1,500 photographs Detailed species accounts describe key identification features, distribution, subspeciation, habitat, behavior, reproduction, and conservation status Fully updated and revised taxonomy, with common and scientific names Easy-to-read distribution maps
Incorporating the latest research of leading scholars in the field, this collection of essays offers a comprehensive overview of function and adaptation in the postcranial skeleton of living and fossil nonhuman primates. Following an essay on the biomechanics of primate limbs, seven essays address major aspects of functional morphology and anatomy in primates—covering the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, hip, thigh, foot, and vertebral column. The final four essays apply this anatomical knowledge toward interpreting positional and locomotor behavior in extinct primates preserved in the fossil record. Generously illustrated, the volume is intended for students of functional comparative anatomy, morphology, zoology, paleontology, and physical anthropology.
Monkey see, monkey do—or does she? Can the behavior of non-human primates—their sociality, their intelligence, their communication—really be chalked up to simple mimicry? Emphatically, absolutely: no. And as famed primatologist Julia Fischer reveals, the human bias inherent in this oft-uttered adage is our loss, for it is only through the study of our primate brethren that we may begin to understand ourselves. An eye-opening blend of storytelling, memoir, and science, Monkeytalk takes us into the field and the world’s primate labs to investigate the intricacies of primate social mores through the lens of communication. After first detailing the social interactions of key species from her fieldwork—from baby-wielding male Barbary macaques, who use infants as social accessories in a variety of interactions, to aggression among the chacma baboons of southern Africa and male-male tolerance among the Guinea baboons of Senegal—Fischer explores the role of social living in the rise of primate intelligence and communication, ultimately asking what the ways in which other primates communicate can teach us about the evolution of human language. Funny and fascinating, Fischer’s tale roams from a dinner in the field shared with lionesses to insights gleaned from Rico, a border collie with an astonishing vocabulary, but its message is clear: it is humans who are the evolutionary mimics. The primate heritage visible in our species is far more striking than the reverse, and it is the monkeys who deserve to be seen. “The social life of macaques and baboons is a magnificent opera,” Fischer writes. “Permit me now to raise the curtain on it.”
Why do orangutan arms closely resemble human arms? What is the advantage to primates of having long limbs? Why do primates have forward-facing eyes? Answers to questions such as these are usually revealed by comparative studies of primate anatomy. In this heavily illustrated, up-to-date textbook, primate anatomist Daniel L. Gebo provides straightforward explanations of primate anatomy that move logically through the body plan and across species. Including only what is essential in relation to soft tissues, the book relies primarily on bony structures to explain the functions and diversity of anatomy among living primates. Ideal for college and graduate courses, Gebo’s book will also appeal to researchers in the fields of mammalogy, primatology, anthropology, and paleontology. Included in this book are discussions of: • Phylogeny• Adaptation• Body size• The wet- and dry-nosed primates• Bone biology• Musculoskeletal mechanics• Strepsirhine and haplorhine heads• Primate teeth and diets• Necks, backs, and tails• The pelvis and reproduction• Locomotion• Forelimbs and hindlimbs• Hands and feet• Grasping toes
Introduction to the Primates is a comprehensive but compact guide to the long evolutionary history of the world�s prosimians, monkeys, and apes, and to the much shorter history of humankind�s interactions with them, from our earliest recorded observations to the severe threats we now pose to their survival. Daris Swindler provides a detailed description of the major primate groups and their environments, from the smallest lemurs of Madagascar to the gorillas of central Africa. He compares and contrasts the primate species, looking at each with a specific anatomical focus. The range of diversity emerges as the particular characteristics of the species becomes increasingly distinct. Swindler also considers primate behavior and its close connections with environment and evolutionary differences. His account of 65 million years of successful adaptation and evolution demonstrates the drama of paleontology as evidence accrues and gaps in the history of primate evolution gradually close.
Does a hulking, hairy, 800-pound, nine-foot-tall, elusive primate roam the woods and forests throughout North America - and the world? Audio-recordings exist purporting to be the creatures' eerie chatter and bone-chilling screaming. Whether called Sasquatch, Yeti, Bigfoot or something else, bipedal primates appear in folklore, legends and eyewitness accounts in every state of the union and many places around the world. The fascination with the man-beast is stronger than ever in today's pop culture.
Linking the evidence of the past with that of the present, this exquisitely illustrated guide examines the evolution of the mammalian fauna of Africa within the context of dramatic changes over the course of more than 30 million years of primate presence. The book covers such topics as dating, continental drift, climate change, and both the physical evolution of the African continent and the biological evolution of its mammalian fauna.Restorations of the musculature of mammals and their appearance take into account the affinities between fossil forms and extant species in order to make well-founded inferences about unpreserved animal attributes. Environmental reconstructions benefit from the authors' visits to more than a dozen wildlife preserves in five African countries as well as the use of an extensive database of published studies on the evolution of landscapes on the continent. A detailed and engaging volume, "Evolving Eden" discusses human evolution as a part of the larger pattern of mammalian evolution while responding to the unique interest that we have for our own past.
A comprehensive response to the many thousands of calls and letters the Smithsonian receives regarding questions related to monkeys, apes, lemurs, tamarins and their relatives. What are primates? How closely related are humans to other primates? How strong is a gorilla? Why do primates spend so much time grooming? Why can't apes talk? These and almost 100 other questions are addressed with clear, thorough answers.

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