"A holistic assessment of what journalism is all about, with plenty of enterprising interpretations of our trade - a word I prefer to 'profession'. I never met a more 'unprofessional' breed than that of my fellow hacks. This book will, I hope, lead our successors both to question and rebel more than we have." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News "Stands out in a crowded field." The Guardian "The bible of professional education in journalism... Every student of journalism should buy a copy." - THE (Times Higher Education) This is the indispensable guide to the theory and practice of journalism, now updated with 25% entirely new material. With its innovative text design, it creatively combines the experience and advice of practising journalists with the theories and insights from the academic study of journalism. This second edition thoroughly addresses the ‘converged’ nature of much 21st century journalism, with discussion and examples of online practice embedded throughout to represent the reality that online journalism is increasingly part of the job for all journalists. New and improved features include: More examples, more depth, and more interviews with journalists. A whole new chapter on telling stories through pictures, whether on TV or online. Fresh new examples reflecting today’s journalistic practice. More insights from online journalists on blogging, the use of video and audio on the web, interactive maps and other ways of doing journalism online. This edition embraces the new without abandoning the fundamentals of what journalism is all about. It will continue to inspire students of journalism to reflect on everyday practice and connect it to academic debate.
The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.
For journalism to survive and flourish, it needs journalists who understand its importance to society, believe in and are committed to its core values, and can put those values into action. This goal is at the heart of Living Journalism, a highly readable, practical book where readers will learn the core values and principles needed to produce work that informs and enlightens an increasingly mobile and participatory audience. The advice and stories of professionals throughout the book allow veteran reporters to serve as mentors to today's journalists.
"Untangles the jargon and sets out the route-map for how the social network can enable us to become major contributors to the multiplatform digital age. The right message, the right time - this is the right book for taking advantage of it all." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News The essential guide to understanding and harnessing the tools of journalism today, Meagan Knight and Clare Cook show you how to master the enduring rules of good practice and the new techniques of social media. The book gives a thorough guide to principles and practice, including: How to find, write and break stories with social media An online journalism toolkit to get you started Using crowdsourcing to find and follow stories Getting on top of user-generated content The ins and outs of copyright and ethics Building your brand and making money The new economy of journalism and how to get ahead. More than a simple 'how-to' guide, this book takes you to the next level with its integration of theory and practice. It is a one-stop guide for students and practitioners of journalism.
Featuring a new code of ethics for journalists and essays by 14 journalism thought leaders and practitioners, The New Ethics of Journalism: Principles for the 21st Century, by Kelly McBride and Tom Rosenstiel, examines the new pressures brought to bear on journalism by technology and changing audience habits. It offers a new framework for making critical moral choices, as well as case studies that reinforce the concepts and principles rising to prominence in 21st century communication. The book addresses the unique problems facing journalism today, including how we arrive at truth in an era of abundant and unverified information; the evolution of new business models and partnerships; the presence of journalists on independent social media platforms; the role of diversity; the meaning of stories; the value of images; and the role of community in the production of journalism.
Watson concludes that journalism practice is guided and defined by law and ethics. Journalists are most likely to follow an ethical principle when it is supported by the law and less likely if it is opposed or not supported by the law. The law at issue is virtually always the First Amendment. Because the Supreme Court has the final say on First Amendment issues, the Court has a powerful influence on the applied ethics of journalism. Watson analyzes Court rulings since 1947 that address journalism's primary ethical principles. He considers the implications of having jurists set the course of proper journalism practice, especially when unfettered journalism ethics require journalists to violate the law.
Long-time peace journalist Steven Youngblood presents the foundations of peace journalism in this exciting new textbook, offering readers the methods, approaches, and concepts required to use journalism as a tool for peace, reconciliation, and development. Guidance is offered on framing stories, ethical treatment of sensitive subjects, and avoiding polarizing stereotypes through a range of international examples and case studies spanning from the Iraq war to the recent unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. Youngblood teaches students to interrogate traditional media narratives about crime, race, politics, immigration, and civil unrest, and to illustrate where—and how—a peace journalism approach can lead to more responsible and constructive coverage, and even assist in the peace process itself.
In a rapidly changing media landscape, what becomes of journalism? Designed to engage, inspire and challenge students while laying out the fundamental principles of the craft, Principles of American Journalism introduces students to the core values of journalism and its singularly important role in a democracy. From the First Amendment to Facebook, Stephanie Craft and Charles N. Davis provide a comprehensive exploration of the guiding principles of journalism—the ethical and legal foundations of the profession, its historical and modern precepts, the economic landscape, the relationships among journalism and other social institutions, and the key issues and challenges that contemporary journalists face. Case studies, discussion questions and field exercises help students to think critically about journalism’s function in society, creating mindful practitioners of journalism and more informed media consumers. With its bottom line under assault, its values being challenged from without and from within and its future anything but certain, it has never been more important to think about what’s unique about journalism. This text is ideal for use in introductory Principles of Journalism courses, and the companion website provides a full complement of student and instructor resources to enhance the learning experience and connect to the latest news issues and events.
Models of Journalism investigates the most fundamental questions of how journalists can best serve the public and what factors enable or obstruct them in doing so. The book evaluates previous scholarly attempts at modeling the function and influencing factors of journalism, and proceeds to develop a range of important new models that take contemporary challenges faced by journalists and journalism into account. Among these new models is the "chronology-of-journalism", which introduces a new set of influencing factors that can affect journalists in the 21st century. These include internal factors – journalistic principles, precedents and practices – and external factors – journalistic production, publication and perception. Another new model, the "journalistic compass", delineates differences and similarities between some of the most important journalistic roles in the media landscape. For each new model, Peter Bro takes the actions and attitudes of individual journalists as its starting point. Models of Journalism combines practice and theory to outline and assess existing theoretical models alongside original ones. The book will be a useful tool for researchers, lecturers and practitioners who are engaged with the ever-evolving notions of what journalism is and who journalists are.
Accuracy and Fairness.
Essays discuss the history and practices of American journalism, covering such topics as ethics, sensationalism, women in journalism, and new technologies.
Disrupting Journalism Ethics sets out to disrupt and change how we think about journalism and its ethics. The book contends that long-established ways of thinking, which have come down to us from the history of journalism, need radical conceptual reform, with alternate conceptions of the role of journalism and fresh principles to evaluate practice. Through a series of disruptions, the book undermines the traditional principles of journalistic neutrality and "just the facts" reporting. It proposes an alternate philosophy of journalism as engagement for democracy. The aim is a journalism ethic better suited to an age of digital and global media. As a philosophical pragmatist, Stephen J. A. Ward critiques traditional conceptions of accuracy, neutrality, detachment and patriotism, evaluating their capacity to respond to ethical dilemmas for journalists in the 21st century. The book proposes a holistic mindset for doing journalism ethics, a theory of journalism as advocacy for egalitarian democracy, and a global redefinition of basic journalistic norms. The book concludes by outlining the shape of a future journalism ethics, employing these alternative notions. Disrupting Journalism Ethics is an important intervention into the role of journalism today. It asks: what new role journalists should play in today’s digital media world? And what new mind-set, new aims, and new standards ought jounalists to embrace? The book aims to persuade—and provoke—ethicists, journalists, students, and members of the public to disrupt and invent.
The rapid growth of online media has led to new complications in journalism ethics and practice. While traditional ethical principles may not fundamentally change when information is disseminated online, applying them across platforms has become more challenging as new kinds of interactions develop between journalists and audiences. In Ethics for Digital Journalists, Lawrie Zion and David Craig draw together the international expertise and experience of journalists and scholars who have all been part of the process of shaping best practices in digital journalism. Drawing on contemporary events and controversies like the Boston Marathon bombing and the Arab Spring, the authors examine emerging best practices in everything from transparency and verification to aggregation, collaboration, live blogging, tweeting and the challenges of digital narratives. At a time when questions of ethics and practice are challenged and subject to intense debate, this book is designed to provide students and practitioners with the insights and skills to realize their potential as professionals.
The Third Edition of Journalism Next: A Practical Guide to Digital Reporting and Publishing is the most informed, practical, and succinct guide to digital technology for journalists. Author Mark Briggs’ forward-thinking techniques and accessible style prepares today’s journalists for tomorrow’s media landscape transformations. Readers will learn how to effectively blog, crowdsource, use mobile technology, mine databases, and expertly capture audio and video to report with immediacy, cultivate community, and convey compelling stories. Briggs helps readers quickly improve their digital literacy by presenting the basics and building on them to progress towards more specialized skills within multimedia. Readers will become equipped to better manage online communities and build an online audience. Journalism Next is a quick yet valuable read that provides a detailed roadmap for journalists to reference time and time again.
Sports Journalism is a comprehensive guide to the purpose, principles and practice of this unique profession. Now in a fully revised and updated second edition, including important new material on social media and the rise of on-line journalism, this is still the only book to explore the fundamentals of sports reporting across every media platform. Combining an introduction to practical skills, contextual discussion of the changing media environment, and important case studies, including the ground-breaking story of Lance Armstrong, the book covers key topics such as: essential relationships in sports journalism - networking and the Sports Desk print journalism for magazines, tabloids, broadsheets and the internet live action – news, radio and television sports journalism effective research – managing and accessing sources, information, statistics practical skills for managing schedules and meeting deadlines working with sports agents and PR professionals getting the best from press conferences and interviews. Laced with revealing anecdotes from the author's own thirty years’ experience of domestic and international sport journalism, and including questions in each chapter to encourage critical reflection and notes on further reading, Sports Journalism is the ultimate insider’s guide and an invaluable student companion.
Responsible Journalism addresses the contentious issue of defining journalistic responsibility. The authors identify the functions that news media take responsibility for performing in society and the philosophy behind specific obligations. They consider the relationship between news media responsibility and legal and press theories. They ask and answer many fundamental ethical questions concerning the media's role in Western democracies.
Journalism Ethics: Arguments and Cases for the 21st Century explores the major ethical dilemmas facing journalists in the digital age. Engaging with both the theory and practice of journalism ethics, this text explains the key ethical concepts and dilemmas in journalism and provides an international range of examples and case studies, considering traditional and social media from a global perspective. Journalism Ethics offers an introductory philosophical underpinning to ethics that traces the history of the freedom of expression from the time of Greek philosophers like Aristotle, through the French and American revolutions, to modern day. Throughout the book Patching and Hirst examine ethically-challenging issues such as deception, trial by media, dealing with sources and privacy intrusion. They also explore continuing ethical fault lines around accuracy, bias, fairness and objectivity, chequebook journalism, the problems of the foreign correspondent, the conflicts between ethics and the law and between journalists and public relations consultants. Concluding with a step-by-step guide to ethical thinking on the job, this textbook is an invaluable resource for students of journalism, media and communication.

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