`Will prove extremely relevant and popular on courses where students are pursuing Media and Journalism degrees' - Granville Williams, Huddersfield University `Journalism: Principles and Practice is essential reading for students, teachers and journalists. It seems destined to become a classic text of journalism education' - Professor Bob Franklin, Cardiff University 'Journalism: Principles and Practice combines practical advice with critical reflection and draws on Tony's 20 years' experience as a journalist. It explains how to "do journalism", how to be a journalist and how to relate all the well-intentioned theory about the profession to doing the real job in the real world' - Hold the Front Page `Novel, user-friendly layout... exhilarating and inspiring... seldom, if ever, have the practical and the theoretical been so well assimilated' - Free Press `This excellent and easy-to-read book will help young journalists understand the real nature of today's media - and their role within in' - Jeremy Dear, NUJ, General Secretary Offering a wide-ranging introduction to journalism and combining the experience and advice of practising journalists with insights gained by the academic study of journalism, Journalism: Principles and Practice: - relates theory to practice throughout - spans print, broadcasting and online journalism - includes sections on news, features, sources, interviewing, and ethics - includes a Style Guide for Journalists and a list of useful websites In addition to explaining `how to do' journalism, each chapter introduces a range of more theoretical concepts designed to encourage reflective practice. However, it also uses the perspective of practitioners to question media theory.
In the framework of democratic societies, investigative journalism is deemed as serving the public interest, helping maintain a healthy public sphere and helping to hold power into account. The ideals of a democratic society justify the idea and practice of investigative journalism. Alternately, modern China runs an authoritarian system of the one-party rule, so where does the idea of investigative journalism fit in? Why can investigative journalism appear in such an authoritarian society and with what characteristics? Investigative Journalism in China examines the four aspects of Chinese investigative journalism (the Idea of investigative journalism and its comparison against Western contexts; the Development/Influence; Reporters and their work; and the Impacts on society), by using empirical data from Dr. Jingrong Tong's fieldwork at two newsrooms (the Southern Metropolitan Daily and the Dahe Daily) in 2006, 73 in-depth-interviews conducted from 2004-2008, and the analysis of internal and public documents and media cases in order to accurately survey the field and put it in context.
For journalism to survive and flourish, it needs journalists who understand its importance to society, believe in and are committed to its core values, and can put those values into action. This goal is at the heart of Living Journalism, a highly readable, practical book where readers will learn the core values and principles needed to produce work that informs and enlightens an increasingly mobile and participatory audience. The advice and stories of professionals throughout the book allow veteran reporters to serve as mentors to today's journalists.
Decades after independence for most African states, the struggle for decolonization is still incomplete, as demonstrated by the fact that Africa remains associated in many Western minds with chaos, illness, and disorder. African and non-African scholars alike still struggle to establish the idea of African humanity, in all its diversity, and to move Africa beyond its historical role as the foil to the West. As this book shows, Africa’s decolonization is an ongoing process across a range of fronts, and intellectuals—both African and non-African—have significant roles to play in that process. The essays collected here examine issues such as representation and retrospection; the roles of intellectuals in the public sphere; and the fundamental question of how to decolonize African knowledges. African Intellectuals and Decolonization outlines ways in which intellectual practice can serve to de-link Africa from its global representation as a debased, subordinated, deviant, and inferior entity. Contributors Lesley Cowling, University of the Witwatersrand Nicholas M. Creary, University at Albany Marlene De La Cruz, Ohio University Carolyn Hamilton, University of Cape Town George Hartley, Ohio University Janet Hess, Sonoma State University T. Spreelin McDonald, Ohio University Ebenezer Adebisi Olawuyi, University of Ibadan Steve Odero Ouma, University of Nairobi Oyeronke Oyewumi, State University of New York at Stony Brook Tsenay Serequeberhan, Morgan State University
Various methods of conveying newsworthy information are discussed in this analysis of the common qualities of public relations and journalism professionals. Practical anecdotes explain how public relations practioners and journalists interact daily in the South African media context. Common features between these two professions are discussed, including how a public relations professional applies journalistic skills including interviewing, writing, taking photographs, and designing page layout. Recent technological developments are covered, and print, television, and electronic media are compared.
The concept of boundaries has become a central theme in the study of journalism. In recent years, the decline of legacy news organizations and the rise of new interactive media tools have thrust such questions as "what is journalism" and "who is a journalist" into the limelight. Struggles over journalism are often struggles over boundaries. These symbolic contests for control over definition also mark a material struggle over resources. In short: boundaries have consequences. Yet there is a lack of conceptual cohesiveness in what scholars mean by the term "boundaries" or in how we should think about specific boundaries of journalism. This book addresses boundaries head-on by bringing together a global array of authors asking similar questions about boundaries and journalism from a diverse range of perspectives, methodologies, and theoretical backgrounds. Boundaries of Journalism assembles the most current research on this topic in one place, thus providing a touchstone for future research within communication, media and journalism studies on journalism and its boundaries.
"Untangles the jargon and sets out the route-map for how the social network can enable us to become major contributors to the multiplatform digital age. The right message, the right time - this is the right book for taking advantage of it all." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News The essential guide to understanding and harnessing the tools of journalism today, Meagan Knight and Clare Cook show you how to master the enduring rules of good practice and the new techniques of social media. The book gives a thorough guide to principles and practice, including: How to find, write and break stories with social media An online journalism toolkit to get you started Using crowdsourcing to find and follow stories Getting on top of user-generated content The ins and outs of copyright and ethics Building your brand and making money The new economy of journalism and how to get ahead. More than a simple 'how-to' guide, this book takes you to the next level with its integration of theory and practice. It is a one-stop guide for students and practitioners of journalism.
Despite best intentions, various codes of ethics and extensive public attention, journalists are repeatedly seen to behave in ways that are less than edifying. With refreshing candour and scholarly rigour, Ian Richards, journalist and academic, examines the reasons why this particular profession is, apparently, so ethically challenged.
Current anxiety about the future of news makes it opportune to revisit the notion of professionalism in journalism. Media expert Silvio Waisbord takes this pressing issue as his theme and argues that “professional journalism” is both a normative and analytical notion. It refers to reporting that observes certain ethical standards as well as to collective efforts by journalists to exercise control over the news. Professionalism should not be narrowly associated with the normative ideal as it historically developed in the West during the past century. Instead, it needs to be approached as a valuable concept to throw into sharp relief how journalists define conditions and rules of work within certain settings. Professionalization is about the specialization of labor and control of occupational practice. These issues are important, particularly amidst the combination of political, technological and economic trends that have profoundly unsettled the foundations of modern journalism. By doing so, they have stimulated the reinvention of professionalism. This engaging and insightful book critically examines the meanings, expectations, and critiques of professional journalism in a global context.
Since the introduction of radio and television news, journalism has gone through multiple transformations, but each time it has been sustained by a commitment to basic values and best practices. Journalism Ethics is a reminder, a defense and an elucidation of core journalistic values, with particular emphasis on the interplay of theory, conceptual analysis and practice. The book begins with a sophisticated model for ethical decision-making, one that connects classical theories with the central purposes of journalism. Top scholars from philosophy, journalism and communications offer essays on such topics as objectivity, privacy, confidentiality, conflict of interest, the history of journalism, online journalism, and the definition of a journalist. The result is a guide to ethically sound and socially justified journalism-in whatever form that practice emerges. Journalism Ethics will appeal to students and teachers of journalism ethics, as well as journalists and practical ethicists in general.
Does objectivity in the news media exist? In The Invention of Journalism Ethics Stephen Ward argues that, given the current emphasis on interpretation, analysis, and perspective, journalists and the public need a new theory of objectivity. He explores the varied ethical assertions of journalists over the past few centuries, focusing on the changing relationship between journalist and audience. This historical analysis leads to an innovative theory of pragmatic objectivity that enables journalists and the public to recognize and avoid biased and unbalanced reporting. Ward convincingly demonstrates that journalistic objectivity is not a set of absolute standards but the same fallible but reasonable objectivity used for making decisions in other professions and public institutions.
The landscape in which journalists now work is substantially different to that of the twentieth century. The rise of digital and social media necessitates a new way of considering the ethical questions facing practicing journalists. This volume considers the various individual, cultural and institutional influences that have an impact on journalistic ethics today. It also examines the links between ethics and professionalism, the organisational promotion of ethical values and the tensions between ethics, freedom of information and speech, and the need to disseminate information. By comparing the theoretical underpinnings of journalistic ethics with a variety of international case studies, this volume provides a comparative global analysis of the ethical challenges faced by the media in the twenty-first century. It will be essential reading for students of journalism and practising journalists.
Learn leadership skills from achievements at special libraries in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Central America! Leadership and Management Principles in Libraries in Developing Countries is a compilation of success stories epitomizing management and leadership strategies from developing nations around the globe. This book focuses on library administrators from Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Central America who have significantly transformed their library services in spite of limited funds and a lack of resources. You'll learn about their achievements, their techniques, and the strengths and skills they used—which can help you become a stronger leader at your own library. Leadership and Management Principles in Libraries in Developing Countries is a collection of selected entries to the Special Libraries Association Leadership and Management Division’s 2003 International Paper Competition for special librarians in developing countries. Each author describes the effective leadership and management that made their special library initiatives successful, providing references, tables, step-by-step instructions, and handy checklists for other librarians to use. In Leadership and Management Principles in Libraries in Developing Countries, library officials discuss the development of successful programs at special libraries such as: the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi, India—where a team of people with diverse backgrounds worked together to digitally modernize their traditional library the Agricultural Libraries and Special Libraries in Tropical Biology located in Indonesia—where special librarians found innovative ways to access funding support and expertise from foreign institutions, international relief agencies, and library associations the Information Resource Centre at The Mildmay Centre in Kampala, Uganda—where the new Mobile Patient Library Services project provides information materials to patients with HIV/AIDS and their caregivers the American Cultural Center Library (now called the Rosa Parks Library) in Niamey, Niger—where the library was restructured from a simple reading room into a diverse cultural resource of exhibitions, seminars, and multilingual reference materials the Federal Ministry of Industry headquarters Library in Nigeria—where the library transformation was made possible through good leadership style, managerial expertise, and effective staff organization the University of Swaziland Libraries in Swaziland—where a strategic planning initiative helped the library widen Internet access, secure subscription funding for database access, and purchase updated equipment to enrich the instructional, research, and administrative functions of the library This book represents a body of practical experience, problems, lessons, and techniques that can be shared and tried by those who want to know more about or deal with the special needs and circumstances of librarians in developing countries. Leadership and Management Principles in Libraries in Developing Countries will show you how to improve both service and outreach to your local community by becoming a leader at your special library, whether you are the librarian, mid-level manager, director, or information consultant. Library science faculty and students will also find that this book illustrates the benefits of good leadership and management.
"The book is well-written, interesting, informative, thorough, and useful! As an educator for 43 years, this is the sort of text that I would be pleased to use in my classroom!....I would highly recommend this book! It is an important contribution to the field!"--Gerry R. Cox, PhD, in Illness, Crisis and Loss This core, introductory textbook for undergraduate and graduate level courses is the first volume to combine the knowledge and skills of counseling psychology with current theory and research in grief and bereavement. It is grounded in the belief that grief counseling is distinct from other therapeutic issues because grief is an adaptive response rather than a form of pathology. The book describes the unique aspects of grief as a normal response to loss, and views the goal of counseling bereaved individuals as one of facilitating the unfolding of the healthy and adaptive aspects of the process as it manifests itself within each client. Grief is considered a response to losses that are both death- and non-death-related; and psychological, physical, social, economical and practical experiences of grief are addressed. The text introduces various theories of bereavement and examines different therapeutic modalities that can be used in the context of grief and loss. Specific counseling practices that facilitate successful interventions are discussed, particularly that of "presence," considered by the authors to be the primary therapeutic stance when working with bereaved individuals. The text also addresses grief counseling with special populations, ethical issues, and self-care concerns for counselors. Case studies, discussion and reflection questions, and suggested additional resources are included in each chapter. Key Features: Regards grief therapy as a unique form of counseling based on grief as an adaptive response rather than as a form of pathology Combines the knowledge and skills of counseling psychology with current research in grief and bereavement Written by a prominent clinician and an educator with over 60 years of combined experience in grief counseling Focuses on the importance of "presence" as the most important therapeutic foundation for working with bereaved individuals
Media, Ritual and Identity examines the role of the media in society; its complex influence on democratic processes and its participation in the construction and affirmation of different social identities. It draws extensively upon cultural anthropology and combines a commanding overview of contemporary media debates with a series of fascinating case studies ranging from political ritual on television to broadcasting in the third world.
Where does journalism fit in the media landscape of blogs, tweets, Facebook postings, YouTube videos, and literally billions of Web pages? Public Journalism 2.0 examines the ways that civic or public journalism is evolving, especially as audience-created content—sometimes referred to as citizen journalism or participatory journalism—becomes increasingly prominent in contemporary media. As the contributors to this edited volume demonstrate, the mere use of digital technologies is not the fundamental challenge of a new citizen-engaged journalism; rather, a depper understanding of how civic/public journalism can inform citizen-propelled initiatives is required. Through a mix of original research, essays, interviews, and case studies, this collection establishes how public journalism principles and practices offer journalists, scholars, and citizens insights into how digital technology and other contemporary practices can increase civic engagement and improve public life. Each chapter concludes with pedagogical features including: * Theoretical Implications highlighting the main theoretical lessons from each chapter, * Practical Implications applying the chapter's theoretical findings to the practice of citizen-engaged jouranlis, *Reflection Questions prompting the reader to consider how to extend the theory and application of the chapter. blogging and other participatory journalism practices enabled by digital technology are not always in line with the original vision of public journalism, which strives to report news in such a way as to promote civic engagement by its audience. Public Journalism 2.0 seeks to reinvent public journalism for the 21st century and to offer visions of how digital technology can be enlisted to promote civic involvement in the news.

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