"A holistic assessment of what journalism is all about, with plenty of enterprising interpretations of our trade - a word I prefer to 'profession'. I never met a more 'unprofessional' breed than that of my fellow hacks. This book will, I hope, lead our successors both to question and rebel more than we have." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News "Stands out in a crowded field." The Guardian "The bible of professional education in journalism... Every student of journalism should buy a copy." - THE (Times Higher Education) This is the indispensable guide to the theory and practice of journalism, now updated with 25% entirely new material. With its innovative text design, it creatively combines the experience and advice of practising journalists with the theories and insights from the academic study of journalism. This second edition thoroughly addresses the ‘converged’ nature of much 21st century journalism, with discussion and examples of online practice embedded throughout to represent the reality that online journalism is increasingly part of the job for all journalists. New and improved features include: More examples, more depth, and more interviews with journalists. A whole new chapter on telling stories through pictures, whether on TV or online. Fresh new examples reflecting today’s journalistic practice. More insights from online journalists on blogging, the use of video and audio on the web, interactive maps and other ways of doing journalism online. This edition embraces the new without abandoning the fundamentals of what journalism is all about. It will continue to inspire students of journalism to reflect on everyday practice and connect it to academic debate.
Since the introduction of radio and television news, journalism has gone through multiple transformations, but each time it has been sustained by a commitment to basic values and best practices. Journalism Ethics is a reminder, a defense and an elucidation of core journalistic values, with particular emphasis on the interplay of theory, conceptual analysis and practice. The book begins with a sophisticated model for ethical decision-making, one that connects classical theories with the central purposes of journalism. Top scholars from philosophy, journalism and communications offer essays on such topics as objectivity, privacy, confidentiality, conflict of interest, the history of journalism, online journalism, and the definition of a journalist. The result is a guide to ethically sound and socially justified journalism-in whatever form that practice emerges. Journalism Ethics will appeal to students and teachers of journalism ethics, as well as journalists and practical ethicists in general.
For journalism to survive and flourish, it needs journalists who understand its importance to society, believe in and are committed to its core values, and can put those values into action. This goal is at the heart of Living Journalism, a highly readable, practical book where readers will learn the core values and principles needed to produce work that informs and enlightens an increasingly mobile and participatory audience. The advice and stories of professionals throughout the book allow veteran reporters to serve as mentors to today's journalists.
Watson concludes that journalism practice is guided and defined by law and ethics. Journalists are most likely to follow an ethical principle when it is supported by the law and less likely if it is opposed or not supported by the law. The law at issue is virtually always the First Amendment. Because the Supreme Court has the final say on First Amendment issues, the Court has a powerful influence on the applied ethics of journalism. Watson analyzes Court rulings since 1947 that address journalism's primary ethical principles. He considers the implications of having jurists set the course of proper journalism practice, especially when unfettered journalism ethics require journalists to violate the law.
In the framework of democratic societies, investigative journalism is deemed as serving the public interest, helping maintain a healthy public sphere and helping to hold power into account. The ideals of a democratic society justify the idea and practice of investigative journalism. Alternately, modern China runs an authoritarian system of the one-party rule, so where does the idea of investigative journalism fit in? Why can investigative journalism appear in such an authoritarian society and with what characteristics? Investigative Journalism in China examines the four aspects of Chinese investigative journalism (the Idea of investigative journalism and its comparison against Western contexts; the Development/Influence; Reporters and their work; and the Impacts on society), by using empirical data from Dr. Jingrong Tong's fieldwork at two newsrooms (the Southern Metropolitan Daily and the Dahe Daily) in 2006, 73 in-depth-interviews conducted from 2004-2008, and the analysis of internal and public documents and media cases in order to accurately survey the field and put it in context.
Media Ethics: Key Principles for Responsible Practice makes ethics accessible and applicable to media practice, and explains key ethical principles and their application in print and broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising, marketing, and digital media. Unlike application-oriented casebooks, this text sets forth the philosophical underpinnings of key principles and explains how each should guide responsible media behavior. Author Patrick Lee Plaisance synthesizes classical and contemporary ethics in an accessible way to help students ask the right questions and develop their critical reasoning skills, as both media consumers and media professionals of the future. The Second Edition includes new examples and case studies, expanded coverage of digital media, and two new chapters that distinguish the three major frameworks of media ethics and explore the discipline across new media platforms, including blogs, new forms of digital journalism, and social networking sites.
Decades after independence for most African states, the struggle for decolonization is still incomplete, as demonstrated by the fact that Africa remains associated in many Western minds with chaos, illness, and disorder. African and non-African scholars alike still struggle to establish the idea of African humanity, in all its diversity, and to move Africa beyond its historical role as the foil to the West. As this book shows, Africa’s decolonization is an ongoing process across a range of fronts, and intellectuals—both African and non-African—have significant roles to play in that process. The essays collected here examine issues such as representation and retrospection; the roles of intellectuals in the public sphere; and the fundamental question of how to decolonize African knowledges. African Intellectuals and Decolonization outlines ways in which intellectual practice can serve to de-link Africa from its global representation as a debased, subordinated, deviant, and inferior entity. Contributors Lesley Cowling, University of the Witwatersrand Nicholas M. Creary, University at Albany Marlene De La Cruz, Ohio University Carolyn Hamilton, University of Cape Town George Hartley, Ohio University Janet Hess, Sonoma State University T. Spreelin McDonald, Ohio University Ebenezer Adebisi Olawuyi, University of Ibadan Steve Odero Ouma, University of Nairobi Oyeronke Oyewumi, State University of New York at Stony Brook Tsenay Serequeberhan, Morgan State University
Various methods of conveying newsworthy information are discussed in this analysis of the common qualities of public relations and journalism professionals. Practical anecdotes explain how public relations practioners and journalists interact daily in the South African media context. Common features between these two professions are discussed, including how a public relations professional applies journalistic skills including interviewing, writing, taking photographs, and designing page layout. Recent technological developments are covered, and print, television, and electronic media are compared.
The concept of boundaries has become a central theme in the study of journalism. In recent years, the decline of legacy news organizations and the rise of new interactive media tools have thrust such questions as "what is journalism" and "who is a journalist" into the limelight. Struggles over journalism are often struggles over boundaries. These symbolic contests for control over definition also mark a material struggle over resources. In short: boundaries have consequences. Yet there is a lack of conceptual cohesiveness in what scholars mean by the term "boundaries" or in how we should think about specific boundaries of journalism. This book addresses boundaries head-on by bringing together a global array of authors asking similar questions about boundaries and journalism from a diverse range of perspectives, methodologies, and theoretical backgrounds. Boundaries of Journalism assembles the most current research on this topic in one place, thus providing a touchstone for future research within communication, media and journalism studies on journalism and its boundaries.
Despite best intentions, various codes of ethics and extensive public attention, journalists are repeatedly seen to behave in ways that are less than edifying. With refreshing candour and scholarly rigour, Ian Richards, journalist and academic, examines the reasons why this particular profession is, apparently, so ethically challenged.
This timely, multiauthored volume focuses on the major issues that shape journalism ethics today--issues such as objectivity, freedom of the press, privacy, control of news organization by nonmedia concerns, increased diversity in news media outlets, morality, professionalism, and accountability.
In a rapidly changing media landscape, what becomes of journalism? Designed to engage, inspire and challenge students while laying out the fundamental principles of the craft, Principles of American Journalism introduces students to the core values of journalism and its singularly important role in a democracy. From the First Amendment to Facebook, Stephanie Craft and Charles N. Davis provide a comprehensive exploration of the guiding principles of journalisme"the ethical and legal foundations of the profession, its historical and modern precepts, the economic landscape, the relationships among journalism and other social institutions, and the key issues and challenges that contemporary journalists face. Case studies, discussion questions and field exercises help students to think critically about journalisme(tm)s function in society, creating mindful practitioners of journalism and more informed media consumers. With its bottom line under assault, its values being challenged from without and from within and its future anything but certain, it has never been more important to think about whate(tm)s unique about journalism. This text is ideal for use in introductory Principles of Journalism courses, and the companion website provides a full complement of student and instructor resources to enhance the learning experience and connect to the latest news issues and events.
The rapid growth of online media has led to new complications in journalism ethics and practice. While traditional ethical principles may not fundamentally change when information is disseminated online, applying them across platforms has become more challenging as new kinds of interactions develop between journalists and audiences. In Ethics for Digital Journalists, Lawrie Zion and David Craig draw together the international expertise and experience of journalists and scholars who have all been part of the process of shaping best practices in digital journalism. Drawing on contemporary events and controversies like the Boston Marathon bombing and the Arab Spring, the authors examine emerging best practices in everything from transparency and verification to aggregation, collaboration, live blogging, tweeting and the challenges of digital narratives. At a time when questions of ethics and practice are challenged and subject to intense debate, this book is designed to provide students and practitioners with the insights and skills to realize their potential as professionals.
"Untangles the jargon and sets out the route-map for how the social network can enable us to become major contributors to the multiplatform digital age. The right message, the right time - this is the right book for taking advantage of it all." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News The essential guide to understanding and harnessing the tools of journalism today, Meagan Knight and Clare Cook show you how to master the enduring rules of good practice and the new techniques of social media. The book gives a thorough guide to principles and practice, including: How to find, write and break stories with social media An online journalism toolkit to get you started Using crowdsourcing to find and follow stories Getting on top of user-generated content The ins and outs of copyright and ethics Building your brand and making money The new economy of journalism and how to get ahead. More than a simple 'how-to' guide, this book takes you to the next level with its integration of theory and practice. It is a one-stop guide for students and practitioners of journalism.
Journalism is being transformed by the digital revolution. Journalists working for media organisations are having to file and update stories across multiple platforms under increasing time pressures. Meanwhile, anyone with sufficient literacy skills and access to the internet can aspire to practise journalism, and many are doing so. And yet journalism in any form still depends for its legitimacy on the observance of ethical principles and practices. For example, it has to maintain a commitment to telling the truth, and to minimise deception and betrayal; deal with conflicts of interest; protect sources and their confidences; know how to report on traumatised and vulnerable people; and know when to respect privacy. Journalism Ethics for the Digital Age covers all these areas and more. It traces the ethics of journalism from their origins in philosophy to the new challenges brought about by digital technology, with practical examples to show how ethical values and principles can play out in the real world. An invaluable tool for ethical decision-making, this is a book for professional journalists and citizen journalists, for students in the disciplines of journalism, media, communications, and applied ethics, and for the engaged reader everywhere.
Current anxiety about the future of news makes it opportune to revisit the notion of professionalism in journalism. Media expert Silvio Waisbord takes this pressing issue as his theme and argues that “professional journalism” is both a normative and analytical notion. It refers to reporting that observes certain ethical standards as well as to collective efforts by journalists to exercise control over the news. Professionalism should not be narrowly associated with the normative ideal as it historically developed in the West during the past century. Instead, it needs to be approached as a valuable concept to throw into sharp relief how journalists define conditions and rules of work within certain settings. Professionalization is about the specialization of labor and control of occupational practice. These issues are important, particularly amidst the combination of political, technological and economic trends that have profoundly unsettled the foundations of modern journalism. By doing so, they have stimulated the reinvention of professionalism. This engaging and insightful book critically examines the meanings, expectations, and critiques of professional journalism in a global context.
This volume is an introduction to the underpinnings of journalism ethics, and a guide for journalists and journalism teachers looking for ways to form consistent and informed ethical decisions

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