Dieses Lehrbuch beschäftigt sich mit den zentralen Gebieten einer maßtheoretisch orientierten Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie im Umfang einer zweisemestrigen Vorlesung. Nach den Grundlagen werden Grenzwertsätze und schwache Konvergenz behandelt. Es folgt die Darstellung und Betrachtung der stochastischen Abhängigkeit durch die bedingte Erwartung, die mit der Radon-Nikodym-Ableitung realisiert wird. Sie wird angewandt auf die Theorie der stochastischen Prozesse, die nach der allgemeinen Konstruktion aus der Untersuchung von Martingalen und Markov-Prozessen besteht. Neu in einem Lehrbuch über allgemeine Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie ist eine Einführung in die stochastische Analysis von Semimartingalen auf der Grundlage einer geeigneten Stetigkeitsbedingung mit Anwendungen auf die Theorie der Finanzmärkte. Das Buch enthält zahlreiche Übungen, teilweise mit Lösungen. Neben der Theorie vertiefen Anmerkungen, besonders zu mathematischen Modellen für Phänomene der Realität, das Verständnis.​
This is a graduate level textbook on measure theory and probability theory. The book can be used as a text for a two semester sequence of courses in measure theory and probability theory, with an option to include supplemental material on stochastic processes and special topics. It is intended primarily for first year Ph.D. students in mathematics and statistics although mathematically advanced students from engineering and economics would also find the book useful. Prerequisites are kept to the minimal level of an understanding of basic real analysis concepts such as limits, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integration, and convergence of sequences and series. A review of this material is included in the appendix. The book starts with an informal introduction that provides some heuristics into the abstract concepts of measure and integration theory, which are then rigorously developed. The first part of the book can be used for a standard real analysis course for both mathematics and statistics Ph.D. students as it provides full coverage of topics such as the construction of Lebesgue-Stieltjes measures on real line and Euclidean spaces, the basic convergence theorems, L^p spaces, signed measures, Radon-Nikodym theorem, Lebesgue's decomposition theorem and the fundamental theorem of Lebesgue integration on R, product spaces and product measures, and Fubini-Tonelli theorems. It also provides an elementary introduction to Banach and Hilbert spaces, convolutions, Fourier series and Fourier and Plancherel transforms. Thus part I would be particularly useful for students in a typical Statistics Ph.D. program if a separate course on real analysis is not a standard requirement. Part II (chapters 6-13) provides full coverage of standard graduate level probability theory. It starts with Kolmogorov's probability model and Kolmogorov's existence theorem. It then treats thoroughly the laws of large numbers including renewal theory and ergodic theorems with applications and then weak convergence of probability distributions, characteristic functions, the Levy-Cramer continuity theorem and the central limit theorem as well as stable laws. It ends with conditional expectations and conditional probability, and an introduction to the theory of discrete time martingales. Part III (chapters 14-18) provides a modest coverage of discrete time Markov chains with countable and general state spaces, MCMC, continuous time discrete space jump Markov processes, Brownian motion, mixing sequences, bootstrap methods, and branching processes. It could be used for a topics/seminar course or as an introduction to stochastic processes. Krishna B. Athreya is a professor at the departments of mathematics and statistics and a Distinguished Professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the Iowa State University. He has been a faculty member at University of Wisconsin, Madison; Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore; Cornell University; and has held visiting appointments in Scandinavia and Australia. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics USA; a fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore; an elected member of the International Statistical Institute; and serves on the editorial board of several journals in probability and statistics. Soumendra N. Lahiri is a professor at the department of statistics at the Iowa State University. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute.
Preface to the Instructor This is a text for a one-quarter or one-semester course in probability, aimed at stu dents who have done a year of calculus. The book is organized so a student can learn the fundamental ideas of probability from the first three chapters without reliance on calculus. Later chapters develop these ideas further using calculus tools. The book contains more than the usual number of examples worked out in detail. It is not possible to go through all these examples in class. Rather, I suggest that you deal quickly with the main points of theory, then spend class time on problems from the exercises, or your own favorite problems. The most valuable thing for students to learn from a course like this is how to pick up a probability problem in a new setting and relate it to the standard body of theory. The more they see this happen in class, and the more they do it themselves in exercises, the better. The style of the text is deliberately informal. My experience is that students learn more from intuitive explanations, diagrams, and examples than they do from theo rems and proofs. So the emphasis is on problem solving rather than theory.
Wenn Sie programmieren können, beherrschen Sie bereits Techniken, um aus Daten Wissen zu extrahieren. Diese kompakte Einführung in die Statistik zeigt Ihnen, wie Sie rechnergestützt, anstatt auf mathematischem Weg Datenanalysen mit Python durchführen können. Praktischer Programmier-Workshop statt grauer Theorie: Das Buch führt Sie anhand eines durchgängigen Fallbeispiels durch eine vollständige Datenanalyse -- von der Datensammlung über die Berechnung statistischer Kennwerte und Identifikation von Mustern bis hin zum Testen statistischer Hypothesen. Gleichzeitig werden Sie mit statistischen Verteilungen, den Regeln der Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung, Visualisierungsmöglichkeiten und vielen anderen Arbeitstechniken und Konzepten vertraut gemacht. Statistik-Konzepte zum Ausprobieren: Entwickeln Sie über das Schreiben und Testen von Code ein Verständnis für die Grundlagen von Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung und Statistik: Überprüfen Sie das Verhalten statistischer Merkmale durch Zufallsexperimente, zum Beispiel indem Sie Stichproben aus unterschiedlichen Verteilungen ziehen. Nutzen Sie Simulationen, um Konzepte zu verstehen, die auf mathematischem Weg nur schwer zugänglich sind. Lernen Sie etwas über Themen, die in Einführungen üblicherweise nicht vermittelt werden, beispielsweise über die Bayessche Schätzung. Nutzen Sie Python zur Bereinigung und Aufbereitung von Rohdaten aus nahezu beliebigen Quellen. Beantworten Sie mit den Mitteln der Inferenzstatistik Fragestellungen zu realen Daten.
Cohesively Incorporates Statistical Theory with R Implementation Since the publication of the popular first edition of this comprehensive textbook, the contributed R packages on CRAN have increased from around 1,000 to over 6,000. Designed for an intermediate undergraduate course, Probability and Statistics with R, Second Edition explores how some of these new packages make analysis easier and more intuitive as well as create more visually pleasing graphs. New to the Second Edition Improvements to existing examples, problems, concepts, data, and functions New examples and exercises that use the most modern functions Coverage probability of a confidence interval and model validation Highlighted R code for calculations and graph creation Gets Students Up to Date on Practical Statistical Topics Keeping pace with today’s statistical landscape, this textbook expands your students’ knowledge of the practice of statistics. It effectively links statistical concepts with R procedures, empowering students to solve a vast array of real statistical problems with R. Web Resources A supplementary website offers solutions to odd exercises and templates for homework assignments while the data sets and R functions are available on CRAN.
This is the only book that gives a rigorous and comprehensive treatment with lots of examples, exercises, remarks on this particular level between the standard first undergraduate course and the first graduate course based on measure theory. There is no competitor to this book. The book can be used in classrooms as well as for self-study.
This book is in two volumes, and is intended as a text for introductory courses in probability and statistics at the second or third year university level. It emphasizes applications and logical principles rather than math ematical theory. A good background in freshman calculus is sufficient for most of the material presented. Several starred sections have been included as supplementary material. Nearly 900 problems and exercises of varying difficulty are given, and Appendix A contains answers to about one-third of them. The first volume (Chapters 1-8) deals with probability models and with mathematical methods for describing and manipulating them. It is similar in content and organization to the 1979 edition. Some sections have been rewritten and expanded-for example, the discussions of independent random variables and conditional probability. Many new exercises have been added. In the second volume (Chapters 9-16), probability models are used as the basis for the analysis and interpretation of data. This material has been revised extensively. Chapters 9 and 10 describe the use of the like lihood function in estimation problems, as in the 1979 edition. Chapter 11 then discusses frequency properties of estimation procedures, and in troduces coverage probability and confidence intervals. Chapter 12 de scribes tests of significance, with applications primarily to frequency data.
This unique book delivers an encyclopedic treatment of classic as well as contemporary large sample theory, dealing with both statistical problems and probabilistic issues and tools. The book is unique in its detailed coverage of fundamental topics. It is written in an extremely lucid style, with an emphasis on the conceptual discussion of the importance of a problem and the impact and relevance of the theorems. There is no other book in large sample theory that matches this book in coverage, exercises and examples, bibliography, and lucid conceptual discussion of issues and theorems.
This is the first half of a text for a two semester course in mathematical statistics at the senior/graduate level for those who need a strong background in statistics as an essential tool in their career. To study this text, the reader needs a thorough familiarity with calculus including such things as Jacobians and series but somewhat less intense familiarity with matrices including quadratic forms and eigenvalues. For convenience, these lecture notes were divided into two parts: Volume I, Probability for Statistics, for the first semester, and Volume II, Statistical Inference, for the second. We suggest that the following distinguish this text from other introductions to mathematical statistics. 1. The most obvious thing is the layout. We have designed each lesson for the (U.S.) 50 minute class; those who study independently probably need the traditional three hours for each lesson. Since we have more than (the U.S. again) 90 lessons, some choices have to be made. In the table of contents, we have used a * to designate those lessons which are "interesting but not essential" (INE) and may be omitted from a general course; some exercises and proofs in other lessons are also "INE". We have made lessons of some material which other writers might stuff into appendices. Incorporating this freedom of choice has led to some redundancy, mostly in definitions, which may be beneficial.
This book provides a versatile and lucid treatment of classic as well as modern probability theory, while integrating them with core topics in statistical theory and also some key tools in machine learning. It is written in an extremely accessible style, with elaborate motivating discussions and numerous worked out examples and exercises. The book has 20 chapters on a wide range of topics, 423 worked out examples, and 808 exercises. It is unique in its unification of probability and statistics, its coverage and its superb exercise sets, detailed bibliography, and in its substantive treatment of many topics of current importance. This book can be used as a text for a year long graduate course in statistics, computer science, or mathematics, for self-study, and as an invaluable research reference on probabiliity and its applications. Particularly worth mentioning are the treatments of distribution theory, asymptotics, simulation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, Markov chains and martingales, Gaussian processes, VC theory, probability metrics, large deviations, bootstrap, the EM algorithm, confidence intervals, maximum likelihood and Bayes estimates, exponential families, kernels, and Hilbert spaces, and a self contained complete review of univariate probability.
Applied Probability presents a unique blend of theory and applications, with special emphasis on mathematical modeling, computational techniques, and examples from the biological sciences. It can serve as a textbook for graduate students in applied mathematics, biostatistics, computational biology, computer science, physics, and statistics. Readers should have a working knowledge of multivariate calculus, linear algebra, ordinary differential equations, and elementary probability theory. Chapter 1 reviews elementary probability and provides a brief survey of relevant results from measure theory. Chapter 2 is an extended essay on calculating expectations. Chapter 3 deals with probabilistic applications of convexity, inequalities, and optimization theory. Chapters 4 and 5 touch on combinatorics and combinatorial optimization. Chapters 6 through 11 present core material on stochastic processes. If supplemented with appropriate sections from Chapters 1 and 2, there is sufficient material for a traditional semester-long course in stochastic processes covering the basics of Poisson processes, Markov chains, branching processes, martingales, and diffusion processes. The second edition adds two new chapters on asymptotic and numerical methods and an appendix that separates some of the more delicate mathematical theory from the steady flow of examples in the main text. Besides the two new chapters, the second edition includes a more extensive list of exercises, many additions to the exposition of combinatorics, new material on rates of convergence to equilibrium in reversible Markov chains, a discussion of basic reproduction numbers in population modeling, and better coverage of Brownian motion. Because many chapters are nearly self-contained, mathematical scientists from a variety of backgrounds will find Applied Probability useful as a reference
This book is a complete revision of the earlier work Probability which ap peared in 1970. While revised so radically and incorporating so much new material as to amount to a new text, it preserves both the aim and the approach of the original. That aim was stated as the provision of a 'first text in probability, de manding a reasonable but not extensive knowledge of mathematics, and taking the reader to what one might describe as a good intermediate level'. In doing so it attempted to break away from stereotyped applications, and consider applications of a more novel and significant character. The particular novelty of the approach was that expectation was taken as the prime concept, and the concept of expectation axiomatized rather than that of a probability measure. In the preface to the original text of 1970 (reproduced below, together with that to the Russian edition of 1982) I listed what I saw as the advantages of the approach in as unlaboured a fashion as I could. I also took the view that the text rather than the author should persuade, and left the text to speak for itself. It has, indeed, stimulated a steady interest, to the point that Springer-Verlag has now commissioned this complete reworking.
Modern Mathematical Statistics with Applications, Second Edition strikes a balance between mathematical foundations and statistical practice. In keeping with the recommendation that every math student should study statistics and probability with an emphasis on data analysis, accomplished authors Jay Devore and Kenneth Berk make statistical concepts and methods clear and relevant through careful explanations and a broad range of applications involving real data. The main focus of the book is on presenting and illustrating methods of inferential statistics that are useful in research. It begins with a chapter on descriptive statistics that immediately exposes the reader to real data. The next six chapters develop the probability material that bridges the gap between descriptive and inferential statistics. Point estimation, inferences based on statistical intervals, and hypothesis testing are then introduced in the next three chapters. The remainder of the book explores the use of this methodology in a variety of more complex settings. This edition includes a plethora of new exercises, a number of which are similar to what would be encountered on the actuarial exams that cover probability and statistics. Representative applications include investigating whether the average tip percentage in a particular restaurant exceeds the standard 15%, considering whether the flavor and aroma of Champagne are affected by bottle temperature or type of pour, modeling the relationship between college graduation rate and average SAT score, and assessing the likelihood of O-ring failure in space shuttle launches as related to launch temperature.
This graduate textbook covers topics in statistical theory essential for graduate students preparing for work on a Ph.D. degree in statistics. The first chapter provides a quick overview of concepts and results in measure-theoretic probability theory that are useful in statistics. The second chapter introduces some fundamental concepts in statistical decision theory and inference. Chapters 3-7 contain detailed studies on some important topics: unbiased estimation, parametric estimation, nonparametric estimation, hypothesis testing, and confidence sets. A large number of exercises in each chapter provide not only practice problems for students, but also many additional results. In addition to improving the presentation, the new edition makes Chapter 1 a self-contained chapter for probability theory with emphasis in statistics. Added topics include useful moment inequalities, more discussions of moment generating and characteristic functions, conditional independence, Markov chains, martingales, Edgeworth and Cornish-Fisher expansions, and proofs to many key theorems such as the dominated convergence theorem, monotone convergence theorem, uniqueness theorem, continuity theorem, law of large numbers, and central limit theorem. A new section in Chapter 5 introduces semiparametric models, and a number of new exercises were added to each chapter.
Probability theory is one branch of mathematics that is simultaneously deep and immediately applicable in diverse areas of human endeavor. It is as fundamental as calculus. Calculus explains the external world, and probability theory helps predict a lot of it. In addition, problems in probability theory have an innate appeal, and the answers are often structured and strikingly beautiful. A solid background in probability theory and probability models will become increasingly more useful in the twenty-?rst century, as dif?cult new problems emerge, that will require more sophisticated models and analysis. Thisisa text onthe fundamentalsof thetheoryofprobabilityat anundergraduate or ?rst-year graduate level for students in science, engineering,and economics. The only mathematical background required is knowledge of univariate and multiva- ate calculus and basic linear algebra. The book covers all of the standard topics in basic probability, such as combinatorial probability, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, fundamental probability inequalities, the central limit theorem, and joint and conditional distributions of discrete and continuous random variables. But it also has some unique features and a forwa- looking feel.
This book offers a straightforward introduction to the mathematical theory of probability. It presents the central results and techniques of the subject in a complete and self-contained account. As a result, the emphasis is on giving results in simple forms with clear proofs and to eschew more powerful forms of theorems which require technically involved proofs. Throughout there are a wide variety of exercises to illustrate and to develop ideas in the text.
This book emphasizes the applications of statistics and probability to finance. The basics of these subjects are reviewed and more advanced topics in statistics, such as regression, ARMA and GARCH models, the bootstrap, and nonparametric regression using splines, are introduced as needed. The book covers the classical methods of finance and it introduces the newer area of behavioral finance. Applications and use of MATLAB and SAS software are stressed. The book will serve as a text in courses aimed at advanced undergraduates and masters students. Those in the finance industry can use it for self-study.
Dieses richtungsweisende Lehrbuch für die Anwendung der Mathematik in anderen Wissenschaftszweigen gibt eine Einführung in die Theorie der gewöhnlichen Differentialgleichungen. Fortran und APL-Programme geben den Studenten die Möglichkeit, verschiedene numerische Näherungsverfahren an ihrem PC selbst durchzurechnen. Aus den Besprechungen: "Die Darstellung ist überall mathematisch streng und zudem ungemein anregend. Abgesehen von manchen historischen Bemerkungen ... tragen dazu die vielen mit ausführlichem Hintergrund sehr eingehend entwickelten praktischen Anwendungen bei. ... Besondere Aufmerksamkeit wird der physikalisch und technisch so wichtigen Frage nach Stabilität von Lösungen eines Systems von Differentialgleichungen gewidmet. Das Buch ist wegen seiner geringen Voraussetzungen und vorzüglichen Didaktik schon für alle Studenten des 3. Semesters geeignet; seine eminent praktische Haltung empfiehlt es aber auch für alle Physiker, die mit Differentialgleichungen und ihren Anwendungen umzugehen haben." #Physikalische Blätter#

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