A manual for researchers writers, editors, lecturers, and Librarians.
Digital records and broad access to the Internet have made it easier for genealogists to gather relevant information from distant sources, but the law remains tied to particular geographic locations. This book discusses the specific laws access to information, protection of personal data, and copyright applicable to those working in Canada.
Presents easy-to-understand strategies for researching family roots online. Featuring detailed explanations, each chapter teaches you how to navigate popular genealogy websites, decipher census data and other online records, and connect with other family members to share your findings. The book also includes tips on using free databases and genealogy apps.
A two volume set which provides researchers with more than 70,000 links to every conceivable genealogical resource on the Internet.
Research your family history using the latest online tools and apps Genealogy Online For Dummies, 7th Edition is the perfect book to help you conduct genealogical research. Updated to cover the latest online tools, this new edition shows you how to leverage social networks and the rapidly increasing number of mobile apps to locate family members and trace their histories. You?ll discover how to start your investigation, develop a research plan of action, identify sites and resources that will be of the most use to you, get information from government records, preserve electronic materials, and share your findings with the rest of the family. Shows you how to conduct research into family history using the latest online tools, mobile apps, and other resources Explains how to use online and offline research techniques and tools for genealogical research, find and share information with other genealogists, and create your own site to showcase your family tree, digital images, and compiled genealogies Includes access to free versions of RootsMagic Essentials and Legacy Family Tree Standard Edition as well as information on free websites for storing your genealogical information Covers DNA research and testing, new geocoding applications, U.S. Census information available online, international records, public access catalogs, and more Genealogy Online For Dummies, 7th Edition helps you follow the clues to uncover your family?s legacy ? the fun and easy way.
If you answered yes to any of these questions, Becoming an Accredited Genealogist is the resource book for you!
A recent Maritz Poll reported that 60% of Americans are interested in their family history. And with good reason. Through genealogy, you can go back into history to meet people who have had more influence on your life than any others -- your ancestors. And the better you get to know your ancestors, the better you will get to know yourself: the who's and what's and why's of you. Barbara Renick, a nationally-known lecturer on genealogy, tells the uninitiated researcher the steps needed to find out who their ancestors really were, and brings together for even the more experienced genealogical researchers the important principles and practices. She covers such topics as the importance of staying organized and how to go about it; where and how to look for information in libraries, historical societies, and on the internet; recognizing that just because something is in print doesn't mean it's right; and how to prepare to visit the home where your ancestors lived. Genealogy 101 is the first book to read when you want to discover who your ancestors were, where they lived, and what they did.
In this study ninety- one professional genealogists tell us why they became interested in genealogy and why they decided to become professional genealogists.
A classic examination of the materials, techniques, and cultural, sociological, and professional aspects of genealogy
Indexes are the essential search tool for genealogists, and this timely book fills a conspicuous void in the literature. Kathleen Spaltro and contributors take an in-depth look at the relationship between indexing and genealogy and explain how genealogical indexes are constructed. They offer practical advice to indexers who work with genealogical documents as well as genealogists who want to create their own indexes. Noeline Bridge's chapter on names will quickly become the definitive reference for trying to resolve questions on variants, surname changes, and foreign designations. Other chapters discuss software, form and entry, the need for standards, and the development of after-market indexes.
Fully updated to cover the latest Web 2.0 technologies—including social networking and blogs Genealogy Online, Ninth Edition provides guided tour of online resources and communities helps anyone begin or dive deeper into a family history project. Thoroughly revised throughout, this new edition shows you how Web 2.0 tools can help you get more done in less time. The book reveals newly available records online, new citation methods for records found on the Internet, and more genealogy sites than ever before! Genealogy experts publish blogs, podcasts, and newsletters filled with guidance, tips, and pointers to help researchers avoid the pitfalls while breaking down the walls that obscure family histories. With coverage of more than 100 websites, this book guides researchers to the best online resources and away from wastes of time and money. Genealogy Online, Ninth Edition features: New case studies and examples Details on the newest resources, including blogs, podcasts, and newsletters Coverage of social networking for genealogists both to gain and to give data, including a chapter on Facebook and Second Life Information on the newly redesigned Mormon Genealogy site, including the indexing program Expanded coverage of library card indexes, PRSI, online databases, and other resources available at local libraries A revised chapter on chat, to include formats such as Skype and IM Review of the Previous Edition “With her thorough but not overwhelming descriptions, Crowe provides genealogists with a solid roadmap for successful searching. Libraries currently owning earlier editions will want to purchase this one for the updated information. Recommended for public and genealogy library collections.” --School Library Journal Everything for the online genealogist: Beginning a Genealogy Project; Software You Will Need; Genealogy Education; Online Communities; Ethics, Privacy, and Law in Genealogy; Revving Up Search Engines; Twitter, Skype, IM and Chat; Genealogy Mail Lists, Newsletters and Mail Groups; Social Networking; Social Bookmarking and Tagging; Blogging Your Genealogy, Sites, Software and More; Vital Records and Historic Documents; The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints; Ellis Island Online: The American Family Immigration History Center; Online Library Card Catalogs and Services; International Genealogy Resources; Ethnic Genealogy Resources; The National Genealogical Society; Ancestry.com and RootsWeb; Genealogical Publishing Houses and Their Sites; A Potpourri of Geneaology; Genealogical Standards and Guidelines from the National Genealogical Society
Describes methods for conducting genealogical research and explains how to trace the history of a family through the use of living sources and public records.
Genealogy expert Dollarhide updates his previous Genealogy Starter Kit with this treatment based upon Internet resources. He reduces the process to its most basic elements, starting with building a set of resources from family interviews, contacting relatives, compiling documentation such as death certificates, using the federal census, and conducting family history catalog searches. He then covers the basics of Internet research, offering research help for the truly addicted and a number of master forms, including data sheets, charts and family group sheets.
Break through brick walls in your genealogical research Learn how to use innovative methods to unearth hard-to-find ancestors. Advanced Genealogy Research Techniques shows you, step by step, how to uncover elusive details by taking advantage of specialized tools and software programs and using proven best practices for breaking through the brick walls that have hindered your progress. You’ll get professional advice on formulating a research strategy, understanding the details you discover, keeping careful track of your data, analyzing the evidence, and developing hypotheses. Real-world case studies demonstrate how you can apply the systematic procedures presented in this practical guide to your own research--and achieve success! Examine the brick wall in detail to find potential weak spots that can be exploited into a breakthrough Use brute force techniques that leave no stone unturned Obtain exact copies of original records rather than derivative sources Research the family, associates, and neighbors (FANs) of your brick wall ancestor Consult with your family, friends, and colleagues to get a fresh perspective on your research Use crowdsourcing--genealogy societies, online forums, social media, blogs, wikis, and podcasts Apply technological solutions, including DNA testing and specialized genealogical software Get tips on hiring a professional genealogical researcher with the appropriate credentials and references Revisit your brick wall problem after honing your research skills Review your evidence, develop a research strategy, and keep a meticulous research log
Explains how to use available sources and resources to trace one's lineage, offering actual case studes to demonstrate how the research is conducted and organized

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