A manual for researchers writers, editors, lecturers, and Librarians.
Digital records and broad access to the Internet have made it easier for genealogists to gather relevant information from distant sources, but the law remains tied to particular geographic locations. This book discusses the specific laws access to information, protection of personal data, and copyright applicable to those working in Canada.
With millions of records now available online, those interested in their family history have a wealth of information—and misinformation—at their fingertips. In this book, author Kimberly Powell, the About.com Guide to Genealogy, helps both novice and experienced genealogists sort it all out. She shows readers where to search and which key-words they’ll need to create an accurate family tree—from start to finish. With this book, readers will learn how to create an online search strategy, use search engines and Soundex to find kin, reach out to others with peer-to-peer record swapping, discover useful records from around the world, and more. Packed with tips on free databases, search sites, and downloadable government records, readers will have all they need to use the Web to dig out their family’s true tale!
A two volume set which provides researchers with more than 70,000 links to every conceivable genealogical resource on the Internet.
A classic examination of the materials, techniques, and cultural, sociological, and professional aspects of genealogy
Indexes are the essential search tool for genealogists, and this timely book fills a conspicuous void in the literature. Kathleen Spaltro and contributors take an in-depth look at the relationship between indexing and genealogy and explain how genealogical indexes are constructed. They offer practical advice to indexers who work with genealogical documents as well as genealogists who want to create their own indexes. Noeline Bridge's chapter on names will quickly become the definitive reference for trying to resolve questions on variants, surname changes, and foreign designations. Other chapters discuss software, form and entry, the need for standards, and the development of after-market indexes.
If you answered yes to any of these questions, Becoming an Accredited Genealogist is the resource book for you!
Genealogy expert Dollarhide updates his previous Genealogy Starter Kit with this treatment based upon Internet resources. He reduces the process to its most basic elements, starting with building a set of resources from family interviews, contacting relatives, compiling documentation such as death certificates, using the federal census, and conducting family history catalog searches. He then covers the basics of Internet research, offering research help for the truly addicted and a number of master forms, including data sheets, charts and family group sheets.
A recent Maritz Poll reported that 60% of Americans are interested in their family history. And with good reason. Through genealogy, you can go back into history to meet people who have had more influence on your life than any others -- your ancestors. And the better you get to know your ancestors, the better you will get to know yourself: the who's and what's and why's of you. Barbara Renick, a nationally-known lecturer on genealogy, tells the uninitiated researcher the steps needed to find out who their ancestors really were, and brings together for even the more experienced genealogical researchers the important principles and practices. She covers such topics as the importance of staying organized and how to go about it; where and how to look for information in libraries, historical societies, and on the internet; recognizing that just because something is in print doesn't mean it's right; and how to prepare to visit the home where your ancestors lived. Genealogy 101 is the first book to read when you want to discover who your ancestors were, where they lived, and what they did.
Norman Wright, a professional genealogist, relates three case studies dealing with genealogical research and the methods which he used to gather the appropriate information. The three cases concerned Ronald Eugene Anderson (1962- ), Jesse W. Taylor (1821-1908) who was born in Indiana and died in Nebraska and, John Jack Fitzgerald (1860-1901) who was born in New York and was murdered in Park City, Utah.
Second volume of papers from a well respected annual seminar that showcase the latest research on Dutch colonial history in New York State.
In this study ninety- one professional genealogists tell us why they became interested in genealogy and why they decided to become professional genealogists.
James L. Meng is a retired labor relations arbitrator who was born in the mid-American steel town of Granite City, Illinois. His parents were born in Freeburg and Newton, Illinois and were active civic leaders in their community. In his formative years, James met several occasions that comprised a very interesting youth. After graduating from college, he joined the Missouri Air National Guard where he was awarded the Airman’s Medal for Valor. Afterwards he continued his education for a Master degree. He married his lovely wife, Beverly, and had two children and four grandchildren. While cleaning out his basement, he discovered several inherited boxes containing family pictures and documents. Although not a genealogist, which he says with a great deal of pride, he fortunately decided to share his information with others, both the born and unborn. This book is written to reflect the lives and personalities of real people – not just the genealogical statistics of born on date, married on date, had child one, two, three and died on this date. These were real people who realized and conquered a variety of life challenges in Germany and in their newly adopted home in America. As a nation of immigrants, we should not let their contributions be forgotten...

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