This is a book that grew out of the many practical "how-to" questions that the author's psychotherapy students have asked him over the years. It is neither an evidence-based compendium nor an attempt to summarize general practice or the viewpoints of others, but rather a handbook of practical answers to many of the questions that may puzzle students of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Some of the short chapters include: How to choose a personal psychoanalyst. How to do an initial interview. How to listen to a patient. How to recognize and understand self-states, multiple identities, true and false selves, etc. How to tell what the transference is. How to deal with the sadomasochistic transference. How to understand the need for recognition. How to think about analytic processHow to practice holistic healing. How to refer a patient for medication. How to get paid for your work. How to manage vacations, weekends, illnesses, no-shows and other disturbances of continuity.
Developmental Perspectives in Child Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy incorporates recent innovations in developmental theory and research into our understanding of the nature of change in child psychotherapy. Diverse psychoanalytic ideas and individual styles are represented, challenging the historical allegiance in analytic child therapy to particular, and so often singular, schools of thought. Each of the distinguished contributors offers a conceptually grounded and clinically rich account of child development, addressing topics such as refl ective functioning, the role of play, dreaming, trauma and neglect, the development of recognition and mutuality, autism, adoption, and non- binary conceptions of gender. Extended clinical vignettes offer the reader clear vision into the convergence of theory and practice, demonstrating the potential of psychoanalytic psychotherapy to move child development forward. This book will appeal to all practicing mental health professionals.
Increased worldwide mobility and easy access to technology means that the use of technological mediation for treatment is being adopted rapidly and uncritically by psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Despite claims of functional equivalence between mediated and co-present treatments, there is scant research evidence to advance these assertions. Can an effective therapeutic process occur without physical co-presence? What happens to screen-bound treatment when, as a patient said, there is no potential to “kiss or kick?” Our most intimate relationships, including that of analyst and patient, rely on a significant implicit non-verbal component carrying equal or possibly more weight than the explicit verbal component. How is this finely-nuanced interchange affected by technologically-mediated communication? This book draws on the fields of neuroscience, communication studies, infant observation, cognitive science and human/computer interaction to explore these questions. It finds common ground where these disparate disciplines intersect with psychoanalysis in their definitions of a sense of presence, upon which the sense of self and the experience of the other depends. This new data reveals surprising and non-intuitive elements, providing a rich knowledge base for better understanding how people experience screen relations based treatments. Embedded throughout the book are the movingly clear voices of clinicians and patients themselves, describing their experiences using technology for treatment. Gillian Isaacs Russell, whose own clinical experience using technological mediation inspired her exploration of therapy on the digital frontier, pays particular attention to the specific gains and losses of mediated communication of which clinicians should be aware before undertaking technologically-mediated psychoanalysis or psychotherapy.
The body, of both the patient and the analyst, is increasingly a focus of attention in contemporary psychoanalytic theory and practice, especially from a relational perspective. There is a renewed regard for the understanding of embodied experience and sexuality as essential to human vitality. However, most of the existing literature has been written by analysts with no formal training in body-centered work. In this book William Cornell draws on his experience as a body-centered psychotherapist to offer an informed blend of the two traditions, to allow psychoanalysts a deep understanding, in psychoanalytic language, of how to work with the body as an ally. The primary focus of Somatic Experience in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy situates systematic attention to somatic experience and direct body-level intervention in the practice of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. It provides a close reading of the work of Wilhelm Reich, repositioning his work within a contemporary psychoanalytic frame and re-presents Winnicott’s work with a particular emphasis on the somatic foundations of his theories. William Cornell includes vivid and detailed case vignettes including accounts of his own bodily experience to fully illustrate a range of somatic attention and intervention that include verbal description of sensate experience, exploratory movement and direct physical contact. Drawing on relevant theory and significant clinical material, Somatic Experience in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy will allow psychoanalysts an understanding of how to work with the body in their clinical practice. It will bring a fresh perspective on psychoanalytic thinking to body-centred psychotherapy where somatic experience is seen as an ally to psychic and interpersonal growth. This book will be essential reading for psychoanalysts, psychodynamically oriented psychotherapists, transactional analysts, body-centred psychotherapists, Gestalt therapists, counsellors and students. William Cornell maintains an independent private practice of psychotherapy and consultation in Pittsburgh, PA. He has devoted 40 years to the study and integration of psychoanalysis, neo-Reichian body therapy and transactional analysis. He is a Training and Supervising Transactional Analyst and has established an international reputation for his teaching and consultation.
In this, the sixth volume in the highly successful monograph series produced under the auspices of the European Federation for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in the Public Health Services (EFPP), the clear distinctions which once existed between psychoanalysis proper and the psychoanalytic psychotherapies are strongly debated and reassessed in the light of contemporary paradigm shifts in treatment modalities.Contributors: Karin Bell; Marilia Aisenstein; Jean-Marie Gauthier; Prophecy Coles; Salomon Resnik; Bernard Golse; Antonio Suman & Antonino Brignone; Douglas Kirsner; Robert D. Hinshelwood
Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy demonstrates why supervision is an essential component of any psychoanalytic or therapeutic work. Drawing on Winnicott and rich clinical material, and featuring work with Patrick Casement, this book provides new guidance on psychodynamic supervision and explores how its skilful use can have a significant effect on the outcome of such work, enabling the practitioner to rethink their theoretical approach, and thereby view issues differently in the clinical setting. Built around the case study of a challenging but successful long term individual therapy, Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy examines how clinicians can become ‘stuck’ in their work with certain patients, struggling to find a way to get through to them. Diana Shmukler brings together a fascinating combination of various perspectives, detailing the patient’s own words, the therapists’ views and reflections and the effect of a brief introduction to Art Therapy, whilst underlining the power and impact, both theoretically and practically, of using a different approach in supervision. Shmukler superbly integrates theory and practice, underlining the validity of a two-person psychology and the therapeutic relationship, whilst also illustrating the centrality of both participant’s commitment to, and belief in, the process of therapy. Importantly, the book provides a clinical example in which the subjectivities of all the participants are shown to be clearly central to the work. Shmukler underlines the significance of supervision to complex cases, even that of a highly experienced therapist. Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy will appeal to psychoanalysts and psychotherapists, students and trainees in integrative psychotherapy, counsellors and psychiatrists, as well as patients seeking help for deep seated issues.
Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy Integration traces the history of efforts to integrate psychoanalysis with other psychotherapeutic modalities, beginning with the early analysts, including Ferenczi and Rank, and continuing on to the present day. It explores the potential for integration made possible by contemporary developments in theory and technique that are fundamental to a relational psychoanalytic approach. Editors Jill Bresler and Karen Starr bring together an array of valuable theoretical and clinical contributions by relationally oriented psychoanalysts who identify their work as integrative. The book is organized in four segments: theoretical frameworks of psychotherapy integration; integrating multiple models of psychotherapy into a psychoanalytically informed treatment; working with specific populations; the future of integration, exploring the issues involved in educating clinicians in integrative practice. The contributions in this volume demonstrate that integrating techniques from a variety of psychotherapies outside of psychoanalysis can enrich and enhance psychoanalytic practice. It will be an invaluable resource for all practicing psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, and psychoanalysts and psychotherapists in training, particularly those with an interest in relational psychoanalysis and psychotherapy integration.
This peer-reviewed journal proposes to explore the introduction of psychoanalysis, psychoanalytic therapy, and the wider application of psychoanalytic ideas into China. It aims to have articles authored by Chinese and Western contributors, to explore ideas that apply to the Chinese clinical population, cultural issues relevant to the practice of analysis and psychotherapy, and to the cultural interface between Western ideas underpinning psychoanalysis, and the richness of Chinese intellectual and philosophical ideas that analysis must encounter in the process of its introduction. The journal will be published first in English and is also planned to be published in Chinese through a collaboration with a Chinese partner. We will feature theoretical and clinical contributions, philosophical and cultural explorations, applications such as the analytic study of art, cinema and theatre, social aspects of analytic thought, and wider cultural and social issues that set the context for clinical practice.
From the unfaithful husband to the binge eater, from the secret cross-dresser to the pilferer of worthless items, there are those who seem to live two lives, to be divided selves, to be literally of two minds. This division or "vertical split" appears in a person at odds with himself, a person who puzzles over, and even heartily dislikes, that parallel person who behaves in so repugnant a manner. In Being of Two Minds, Arnold Goldberg provides trenchant insight into such divided minds - their origins, their appearances, and their treatment. Goldberg's inquiry into divided minds leads to a return to the psychoanalytic concept of disavowal, which forms the basis of the vertical split. Goldberg explores the developmental circumstances that tend to a reliance on disavowal, provides numerous examples of the emergence of disavowal in the treatment situation, and considers the therapeutic approaches through which disavowal may be addressed. He is especially perceptive in discussing the manner in which the therapist's own tendency to disavow may collusively interact with that of the patient. Goldberg considers the full range of splits to which disavowal gives rise, from circumscribed instances of dissociation to the much-debated multiple personality disorders. He gives special attention to the role of the vertical split in patients with behavior disorders; here his thoughtful insights point to a treatment approach that significantly differs both from the simple ascription of a 'self disorder' and from the usual pedagogical emphasis on issues of self-control and/or punishment. As Goldberg shows, the repugnance felt by many therapists for offensive behaviors emanating from the patient's parallel self are frequently shared by the patient, who commonly despises misbehavior that he is unable to understand. Being of Two Minds begins to formulate just such understanding, to the great benefit of patient and therapist alike.
Deals with initial interviews in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, suggesting the idea of special "indicators". This book provides psychoanalytical understanding of initial interviews to evaluate the patient's suitability for a psychoanalytically based treatment, discussing the dynamics, aims and technique of the interview.
Dr. Firestein examined the cases of four men and four women who entered the termination phase of analysis at the Treatment Center of the New York Psychoanalytic Institute. In the current paperback edition the case records of the eight psychoanalyses that formed the main portion of the earlier edition remain as they were. Although none of the analysts would today conduct those treatments in the same manner as is summarized, the accounts are faithful to what unfolded in each of the treatment collaborations. The current edition accomplishes several purposes: to amend the essay that reviewed the literature up to 1978 with selected references to contributions of the past two decades; to discuss ways in which termination of psychotherapy resembles, and is different from, termination in analysis, and to consider many facets of treatment termination in some detail.
Looks at how therapy and the "talking cure" have been portrayed in the movies.
From time to time therapists find themselves in a bind—faced with a challenging situation, unsure how to proceed. Such a conundrum leaves the therapist on edge, concerned that the success of treatment might rest on how he or she responds to the circumstance. The situation seems to call for more than pat clinical protocol, leaving the therapist uncertain as he or she ventures into novel territory wondering "what do I do now?" Conundrums and Predicaments in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The Clinical Moments Project comprises twelve distinct clinical moments during which the treating/presenting analyst feels him- or herself in just such a quandary. The presented moment comes to a head at a point where the therapist feels uncertain what his or her next and best "move" might be—one that balances the protection of the therapeutic alliance with the need to address a clinical development head on. Space is then left for 25 well-known analysts ("commentators") of varying theoretical persuasions to weigh in, sharing what they think about the situation and how they imagine they might have proceeded. In the final analysis, the point of this project is not to determine how the moment "should" have been handled given the input of experts; rather, it aims to illuminate the clinical theories that therapists carry with them into sessions where they operate implicitly, directing their attention to select sorts of data that are then used to fashion an intervention. This, then, is the ultimate lesson of the Clinical Moments Project—to learn how to listen to how therapists listen to the unfolding material. This book will be of great interest to psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists of all persuasions.
There is increasing concern about the growing state influences on the talking therapies. Critical Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis and Counselling: Implications for Practice is a response to that concern. It is the first book to assess the use of the word 'critical' as a prefix for psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and counselling. It also contributes to an understanding of such issues as capital governance, power and social inequalities, and their influence on the provision of the talking therapies in our neoliberal society. In this groundbreaking book, authors from Europe and North America are brought together to offer a background to critical movements in the mental health fields and to consider what psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and counselling can learn from them. The chapters look at what 'critical' means in terms of both theory and practice, from perspectives such as queer theory, feminism, Marxism and users of talking therapies, and explore implications for training and education in the talking therapies. This book will be of interest to practitioners and students in psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, counselling and counselling psychology as it is not only a welcome exploration of the way in which the state influences the talking therapies, but it also encourages critical thinking about both theory and practice.
Process Facilitation in Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy and Social Work elaborates a differential theory of therapeutic engagement with full reference not only to psychoanalysis and to psychotherapy but also – surprisingly – to social work. When contemporary social work with the marginalised achieves mutual constructive collaboration, social workers characteristically notice an unfolding process. Could this correspond to the ‘analytic process’ of psychoanalysis? Sylvia O’Neill seeks to explain theoretically, and to illustrate clearly in practice, just how a quasi-autonomous therapeutic process becomes established. The theory underpinning the book is Jean-Luc Donnet’s conceptualisation of the establishment of the analytic process in psychoanalysis through introjection of the analytic setting. Donnet designates the psychoanalytic setting as the analytic ‘site’. O’Neill proceeds to trace, by means of detailed clinical discussion, the analogous process by which a viable therapeutic process can become established through created/found discovery and introjection of the relevant ‘site’ or setting in psychoanalytic psychotherapy and in social work. Amongst the most important elements are the practitioner’s internalised theoretical principles. The book demonstrates that unconscious introjection figures more importantly in effective therapeutic engagement than a conscious therapeutic alliance. An important corollary for social work is that, contrary to popular myth, no prior psychological-mindedness is required. The differential theory of Process Facilitation in Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy and Social Work is equally relevant to psychodynamic counselling.
This book focuses on the issue of mistakes in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapy--the inevitability of making them, as far as possible how to avoid them, and what therapists can do to transform potential disasters into a means for growth in themselves as well as the patient. Further developing the creative therapeutic approach first elaborated in his classic Learning from the Patient, distinguished clinician and author Patrick Casement makes a compelling case for being open-minded rather than dogmatic in clinical practice. He shows how analysts can become blind to their own mistakes, and even more significantly, can fail to recognize when their efforts to guide or control the therapeutic process have become a problem for the patient. A wealth of evocative case material is used to illustrate how the process of internal supervision can facilitate heightened awareness of the patient's experience within the clinical encounter. Written with rare candor, this book challenges many traditional assumptions even as it affirms the healing power of psychodynamic work. It will be read with pleasure by practicing therapists as well as students and trainees. Winner--Gradiva Award, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis

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