This is a book that grew out of the many practical "how-to" questions that the author's psychotherapy students have asked him over the years. It is neither an evidence-based compendium nor an attempt to summarize general practice or the viewpoints of others, but rather a handbook of practical answers to many of the questions that may puzzle students of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Some of the short chapters include: How to choose a personal psychoanalyst. How to do an initial interview. How to listen to a patient. How to recognize and understand self-states, multiple identities, true and false selves, etc. How to tell what the transference is. How to deal with the sadomasochistic transference. How to understand the need for recognition. How to think about analytic processHow to practice holistic healing. How to refer a patient for medication. How to get paid for your work. How to manage vacations, weekends, illnesses, no-shows and other disturbances of continuity.
Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy demonstrates why supervision is an essential component of any psychoanalytic or therapeutic work. Drawing on Winnicott and rich clinical material, and featuring work with Patrick Casement, this book provides new guidance on psychodynamic supervision and explores how its skilful use can have a significant effect on the outcome of such work, enabling the practitioner to rethink their theoretical approach, and thereby view issues differently in the clinical setting. Built around the case study of a challenging but successful long term individual therapy, Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy examines how clinicians can become ‘stuck’ in their work with certain patients, struggling to find a way to get through to them. Diana Shmukler brings together a fascinating combination of various perspectives, detailing the patient’s own words, the therapists’ views and reflections and the effect of a brief introduction to Art Therapy, whilst underlining the power and impact, both theoretically and practically, of using a different approach in supervision. Shmukler superbly integrates theory and practice, underlining the validity of a two-person psychology and the therapeutic relationship, whilst also illustrating the centrality of both participant’s commitment to, and belief in, the process of therapy. Importantly, the book provides a clinical example in which the subjectivities of all the participants are shown to be clearly central to the work. Shmukler underlines the significance of supervision to complex cases, even that of a highly experienced therapist. Supervision in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy will appeal to psychoanalysts and psychotherapists, students and trainees in integrative psychotherapy, counsellors and psychiatrists, as well as patients seeking help for deep seated issues.
In order to complete training successfuIly, every psychoanalyst has to be a supervisee. This experience leads each analyst to want to become a supervisor. Until recently, very little has been discussed about wh at supervision is, how it is done, and how it is related to the various theories of psychoanalysis that are held as articles of faith. The 1980-1981 program of the William Alanson White Psychoanaly tic Society was devoted to supervision-with representatives of various "schools" demonstrating their ways of doing consultations with ana lysts about patients. This book is an extension of that endeavor. In it, supervisors of various persuasions discuss this topic. The editors-Leopold Caligor, Philip M. Bromberg, and James D. Meltzer-are to be congratulated for the high level of discourse repre sented by the various chapters. They are to be commended as weIl about the eloquent statement this book makes-namely, there are many an swers and approaches and no final answer to the questions raised by the volume.
The book deals with initial interviews in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, suggesting the idea of special "indicators". These indicators relate to three main areas. Firstly, psychoanalytical understanding of initial interviews to evaluate the patient's suitability for a psychoanalytically based treatment, discussing the dynamics, aims and technique of the interview. Three areas to be explored in the interview are considered: psychopathological data; biographical data, and data arising from the interaction of the patient with the therapist in the interview itself.Secondly, part of the book is devoted to the definition and description of what the author calls "indicators" for the therapist to build a personality profile showing suitability for psychoanalytic treatment. The main theoretical bases of the book are Freud, Klein and Bion.A third part deals with the controversial issue of the differentiation between psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The specificity of psychoanalysis is defined in comparison with psychotherapy. A specific psychoanalytic method and setting may be created as well as a specific psychotherapeutic method and setting.
In this, the sixth volume in the highly successful monograph series produced under the auspices of the European Federation for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in the Public Health Services (EFPP), the clear distinctions which once existed between psychoanalysis proper and the psychoanalytic psychotherapies are strongly debated and reassessed in the light of contemporary paradigm shifts in treatment modalities.Contributors: Karin Bell; Marilia Aisenstein; Jean-Marie Gauthier; Prophecy Coles; Salomon Resnik; Bernard Golse; Antonio Suman & Antonino Brignone; Douglas Kirsner; Robert D. Hinshelwood
Increased worldwide mobility and easy access to technology means that the use of technological mediation for treatment is being adopted rapidly and uncritically by psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Despite claims of functional equivalence between mediated and co-present treatments, there is scant research evidence to advance these assertions. Can an effective therapeutic process occur without physical co-presence? What happens to screen-bound treatment when, as a patient said, there is no potential to “kiss or kick?” Our most intimate relationships, including that of analyst and patient, rely on a significant implicit non-verbal component carrying equal or possibly more weight than the explicit verbal component. How is this finely-nuanced interchange affected by technologically-mediated communication? This book draws on the fields of neuroscience, communication studies, infant observation, cognitive science and human/computer interaction to explore these questions. It finds common ground where these disparate disciplines intersect with psychoanalysis in their definitions of a sense of presence, upon which the sense of self and the experience of the other depends. This new data reveals surprising and non-intuitive elements, providing a rich knowledge base for better understanding how people experience screen relations based treatments. Embedded throughout the book are the movingly clear voices of clinicians and patients themselves, describing their experiences using technology for treatment. Gillian Isaacs Russell, whose own clinical experience using technological mediation inspired her exploration of therapy on the digital frontier, pays particular attention to the specific gains and losses of mediated communication of which clinicians should be aware before undertaking technologically-mediated psychoanalysis or psychotherapy.
Developmental Perspectives in Child Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy incorporates recent innovations in developmental theory and research into our understanding of the nature of change in child psychotherapy. Diverse psychoanalytic ideas and individual styles are represented, challenging the historical allegiance in analytic child therapy to particular, and so often singular, schools of thought. Each of the distinguished contributors offers a conceptually grounded and clinically rich account of child development, addressing topics such as refl ective functioning, the role of play, dreaming, trauma and neglect, the development of recognition and mutuality, autism, adoption, and non- binary conceptions of gender. Extended clinical vignettes offer the reader clear vision into the convergence of theory and practice, demonstrating the potential of psychoanalytic psychotherapy to move child development forward. This book will appeal to all practicing mental health professionals.
This collection of papers from psychoanalysts across Europe is intended to highlight the similarites and differences between approaches to working with children and adolescents. Part of the EFPP Monograph Series.
Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy Integration traces the history of efforts to integrate psychoanalysis with other psychotherapeutic modalities, beginning with the early analysts, including Ferenczi and Rank, and continuing on to the present day. It explores the potential for integration made possible by contemporary developments in theory and technique that are fundamental to a relational psychoanalytic approach. Editors Jill Bresler and Karen Starr bring together an array of valuable theoretical and clinical contributions by relationally oriented psychoanalysts who identify their work as integrative. The book is organized in four segments: theoretical frameworks of psychotherapy integration; integrating multiple models of psychotherapy into a psychoanalytically informed treatment; working with specific populations; the future of integration, exploring the issues involved in educating clinicians in integrative practice. The contributions in this volume demonstrate that integrating techniques from a variety of psychotherapies outside of psychoanalysis can enrich and enhance psychoanalytic practice. It will be an invaluable resource for all practicing psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, and psychoanalysts and psychotherapists in training, particularly those with an interest in relational psychoanalysis and psychotherapy integration.
'Psychoanalysis has, from its inception, been a discipline concerned with overcoming the ill effects of certain social taboos. Given this focus, it might be assumed that psychoanalysis and its practitioners are free of the constraints imposed by restrictive taboos. This book challenges this idea by examining a sampling of the taboos that are rife in the field. It is not intended to offer a complete summary of all of the forbidden ideas, clinical procedures, behaviors and institutional practices in psychoanalysis, but rather to raise consciousness about the fact that even within a field which encourages freedom of expression, many issues remain difficult to fully discuss both in the consulting room and in professional discourse. The book provides a refreshing, thoughtful, honest look at many of the taboos present in psychoanalysis, even at this moment of greatly improved communication between the various theoretical schools in the field. Reading it provides a sense of freedom for the reader, as speaking of forbidden thoughts always does. We hope the book will inspire others to seriously consider the taboos that hamper their practices, and that further ideas on these issues will come to light.'- Lori Bohm, from the IntroductionTaboo or Not Taboo? Forbidden Thoughts, Forbidden Acts in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy has been awarded the Goethe Award for Psychoanalytic & Psychodynamic Scholarship for 2009.
This book has been written for a broad audience. It is addressed to anyone who is at all concerned with a scientific grounding for the art of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, and for the understanding of the human mind and its outputs via emotionally charged communication. The book begins by establishing the need for a formal science of psychoanalysis and then presents the distinctive features of the communicative approach that moved it towards the creation of that science.
Is therapy’s relational turn only something to celebrate? It is a major worldwide trend taking place in all the therapy traditions. But up to now appreciation of these developments has not been twinned with well-informed and constructive critique. Hence practitioners and students have not been able to engage as fully as they might with the complex questions and issues that relational working presents. Relational Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis and Counselling: Appraisals and reappraisals seeks to redress this balance. In this unique book, Del Loewenthal and Andrew Samuels bring together the contributions of writers from several countries and many therapy modalities, all of whom have engaged with what ‘relational’ means – whether to espouse the idea, to urge caution or to engage in sceptical reflection. Relational Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis and Counselling: Appraisals and reappraisals presents clinical work of the highest standard in a way that is moving and draws the reader in. The more intellectual contributions are accessible and respectful, avoiding the polarising tendencies of the profession. At a time when there has been a decline in the provision and standing of the depth therapies across the globe, this book shows that, whatever the criticisms, there is still creative energy in the field. It is hoped that practitioners and students in psychoanalysis, psychotherapy counselling and counselling psychology will welcome this book for its cutting edge content and compassionate tone.
This book is an introductory textbook for psychiatrists and psychologists who use psychotherapy in a psychoanalytic attitude in their daily professional work with patients. It was developed from the experiences of German psychoanalysts teaching in China between 1997 and 2010. The idea of a basic textbook was developed in order to facilitate the teaching and learning process. The basic idea of this book is to give the reader an introductory understanding of the psychoanalytic theory of the human mind, the psychic development, psychic conflicts, trauma, symptom formation, and dreams. Related to these theoretical aspects the book then introduces the fundamentals of psychoanalytic-oriented psychotherapy. The first part of this book deals with important technical aspects of the psychotherapeutic treatment such as the therapeutic relationship, the setting, the diagnosis, and the process of treatment. The second part explores the psychoanalytic understanding of specific clinical disorders, including neuroses and personality.Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: A Handbook seeks to provide a complete overview from a psychoanalytical point of view of theoretical and clinical aspects of psychodynamic or psychoanalytic psychotherapy.
Combining cutting-edge expertise with deeply rooted Christian insights, this text from a leading figure in the Christian counseling community offers readers a comprehensive survey of ten major counseling and psychotherapy approaches. For each approach, Siang-Yang Tan first provides a substantial introduction, assessing the approach's effectiveness and the latest research findings or empirical evidence for it. He then critiques the approach from a Christian perspective. Tan also includes hypothetical transcripts of interventions for each major approach to help readers get a better sense of the clinical work involved. This book presents a Christian approach to counseling and psychotherapy that is Christ centered, biblically based, and Spirit filled.
Building on the enormous popularity of her two previous texts on diagnosis and case formulation, this important work from Nancy McWilliams completes the trilogy by addressing in detail the art and science of psychodynamic treatment. McWilliams distills the essential principles of clinical practice, including effective listening and talking; transference and countertransference; emotional safety; and an empathic, attuned attitude toward the patient. The author describes the values, assumptions, and clinical and research findings that guide the psychoanalytic enterprise, and shows how to integrate elements of other theoretical perspectives when necessary. She also discusses the phases of treatment and covers such neglected topics as educating the client about the therapeutic process, handling complex challenges to boundaries, and attending to self-care. Presenting complex clinical information in personal, nontechnical language enriched by in-depth clinical vignettes, this is an essential psychoanalytic work and training text for therapists.
Since Freud’s publication of 'Little Hans', advances in psychoanalytic technique and theory have transformed our clinical work with children. Individuals including Anna Freud, Melanie Klein and Donald Winnicott have influenced psychoanalytic play therapy and broadened the scope of practice with them. Contemporary psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic social work clinicians often find themselves responding to misapprehensions and distortions about psychoanalytic theory and treatment created or promoted in popular culture. Furthermore, clinical practices are subject to the disruptive influence of managed mental health care and, with the ascendancy of biological psychiatry, an increasing reliance on psychoactive drugs in the treatment of children, often in the absence of sound research support. In this book, expert international contributors explore developmental, theoretical and clinical themes in work with children. Focusing on diverse populations and varied treatment settings, they present compelling clinical cases and research that, collectively, demonstrate the efficacy and relevance of psychoanalytic ideas in the context of play therapy. This book was originally published as a special issue of Psychoanalytic Social Work.
This book focuses on the issue of mistakes in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapy--the inevitability of making them, as far as possible how to avoid them, and what therapists can do to transform potential disasters into a means for growth in themselves as well as the patient. Further developing the creative therapeutic approach first elaborated in his classic Learning from the Patient, distinguished clinician and author Patrick Casement makes a compelling case for being open-minded rather than dogmatic in clinical practice. He shows how analysts can become blind to their own mistakes, and even more significantly, can fail to recognize when their efforts to guide or control the therapeutic process have become a problem for the patient. A wealth of evocative case material is used to illustrate how the process of internal supervision can facilitate heightened awareness of the patient's experience within the clinical encounter. Written with rare candor, this book challenges many traditional assumptions even as it affirms the healing power of psychodynamic work. It will be read with pleasure by practicing therapists as well as students and trainees. Winner--Gradiva Award, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis

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