What are "essential questions," and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What's so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom? Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students' discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the content. Whether you are an Understanding by Design (UbD) devotee or are searching for ways to address standards--local or Common Core State Standards--in an engaging way, Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins provide practical guidance on how to design, initiate, and embed inquiry-based teaching and learning in your classroom. Offering dozens of examples, the authors explore the usefulness of EQs in all K-12 content areas, including skill-based areas such as math, PE, language instruction, and arts education. As an important element of their backward design approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, the authors *Give a comprehensive explanation of why EQs are so important; *Explore seven defining characteristics of EQs; *Distinguish between topical and overarching questions and their uses; *Outline the rationale for using EQs as the focal point in creating units of study; and *Show how to create effective EQs, working from sources including standards, desired understandings, and student misconceptions. Using essential questions can be challenging--for both teachers and students--and this book provides guidance through practical and proven processes, as well as suggested "response strategies" to encourage student engagement. Finally, you will learn how to create a culture of inquiry so that all members of the educational community--students, teachers, and administrators--benefit from the increased rigor and deepened understanding that emerge when essential questions become a guiding force for learners of all ages.
Seminars by Professor Windy Dryden. See the man live and in action. To find out more and to book your place go to www.cityminds.com ________________________________________ `It is a fairly well established clich[ac]e that while supervision is recognised as a crucial component of good practice in psychotherapy and counselling, there is correspondingly little written about it... [this book is] a good step in redressing the balance... It is a practical, didactic and generic view of how to do supervision... giving a fairly comprehensive account of 30 of the formal skills that all supervisors probably use whether consciously or not... The book discusses each of the skills, giving examples as well as practical suggestions as to how to approach difficult issues... directed principally at counsellors, it is a book to dip into when faced with a panic about a specific issue' - Therapeutic Communities Supervision is a professional and ethical necessity for all counsellors, providing them with consultative and supportive aid while protecting clients from potential abuse - yet relatively little has been written on the subject. This volume aims to redress that balance. Encouraging, yet sensitive to the difficult issues that frequently arise in supervision, the book contains practical suggestions, plus useful appendices, to help practising and trainee supervisors develop and enhance the skills they need to be successful in their work. The authors cover such key areas as creating a supervisory alliance, fostering the supervisory relationship, the use of tape-recording, highlighting supervisees' strengths and weaknesses, and protecting the client and counsellor.
This much-needed book provides a systematic introduction, both conceptual and applied, to the sociology of the professions. Keith Macdonald guides the reader through the chief sociological approaches to the professions, addressing their strengths and weaknesses. The discussion is richly illustrated by examples from and comparisons between the professions in Britain, the United States and Europe, relating their development to their cultural context. The social exclusivity that professions aim for is discussed in relation to social stratification, patriarchy and knowledge, and is thoroughly illustrated by reference to examples from medicine and other established professions, such as law and architecture. The themes of the book are drawn together in a final chapter by means of a case study of accountancy.
Provides strategies for successful classroom management.
Vols. for 1921-1969 include annual bibliography, called 1921-1955, American bibliography; 1956-1963, Annual bibliography; 1964-1968, MLA international bibliography.
This work provides an extensive guide for students, fans, and collectors of Marvel Comics. Focusing on Marvel’s mainstream comics, the author provides a detailed description of each comic along with a bibliographic citation listing the publication’s title, writers/artists, publisher, ISBN (if available), and a plot synopsis. One appendix provides a comprehensive alphabetical index of Marvel and Marvel–related publications to 2005, while two other appendices provide selected lists of Marvel–related game books and unpublished Marvel titles.

Best Books