In A Quick Guide to Boosting English Acquisition in Choice Time Alison and Cheryl explain how choice-time workshops can be structured to help English language learners imagine, create, and explore language through play. They outline two units of study for choice-time workshops, the first using open-ended materials, the other using literature to inspire play. A Quick Guide to Boosting English Acquisition in Choice Time is part of the Workshop Help Desk series. About the Workshop Help Desk series The Workshop Help Desk series is designed for teachers who believe in workshop teaching and who have already rolled up their sleeves enough to have encountered the predictable challenges. If you've struggled to get around quickly enough to help all your writers, if you've wondered how to tweak your teaching to make it more effective and lasting, if you've needed to adapt your teaching for English learners, if you've struggled to teach grammar or nonfiction writing or test prep...if you've faced these and other specific, pressing challenges, then this series is for you. Provided in a compact 5" x 7" format, the Workshop Help Desk series offers pocket-sized professional development. For a comprehensive overview of the Units of Study for Teaching Writing series, including sample minilessons, sample videos, curricular calendars, overview presentations, frequently asked questions, and information on the companion principal's guide and the Workshop Help Desk series visit unitsofstudy.com.
In Play=Learning, top experts in child development and learning contend that in over-emphasizing academic achievement, our culture has forgotten about the importance of play for children's development.
Play is an essential part of learning and development for children and is an increasingly important aspect of creative approaches to teaching and learning in primary education. This book demonstrates the value of play in all its different forms as a highly effective medium for teaching and learning across the curriculum. The authors explore how play can be used to increase engagement, motivation and fun in learning situations, examining the theoretical principles of play for learning, types of play for older children, planned and facilitating play-based learning, using thematic approaches when working with individuals, groups and whole classes, in addition to covering important teaching issues such as assessment, inclusion and transition out of primary education. This is recommended reading for students on primary initial teacher education courses including undergraduate (BEd, BA with QTS), postgraduate (PGCE, SCITT), and employment-based routes into teaching, and also for practicing teachers wishing to enhance their own teaching. Mary Briggs is Mathematics and Education tutor at the University of Warwick. Alice Hansen is an educational consultant who works within a number of educational settings and national bodies developing continuing professional development for teachers.
"This book is a place to start creating the classroom of your dreams from the very first minute of school, a classroom that is research based, child centered, and in step with the world today." - Christine Hertz and Kristine Mraz The classroom of your dreams starts with one big idea. From the first days of school to the last, Kids First from Day One shares teaching that puts your deepest teaching belief into action: that children are the most important people in the room. Christine Hertz and Kristi Mraz show how to take that single, heartfelt value and create a cohesive, highly effective approach to teaching that addresses today's connected, collaborative world. With infectious enthusiasm, hard-won experience, and a generous dose of humor, Kids First from Day One shows exactly how Christine and Kristi build and maintain a positive, cooperative, responsive classroom where students engage deeply with their learning and one another. Kids First from Day One strengthens and deepens the connections between your love of working with kids, your desire to impact their lives, and your teaching practice. It shares: plans for designing beautiful classroom spaces that burst with the fun of learning positive language and classroom routines that reduce disruptive behavior-without rewards and consequences suggestions for matching students' needs to high-impact teaching structures a treasury of the Christine and Kristi's favorite "teacher stuff" such as quick guides for challenging behavior, small-group planning grids, and parent letters links to videos that model the moves of Christine's and Kristi's own teaching. Just starting out and want to know what really works in classrooms? Curious about how to make your room hum with learning? Or always on the lookout for amazing teaching ideas? Read Kids First from Day One. You'll discover that the classroom of your dreams is well within your reach.
Social and emotional learning is at the heart of good teaching, but as standards and testing requirements consume classroom time and divert teachers' focus, these critical skills often get sidelined. In "Sharing the Blue Crayon," Mary Anne Buckley shows teachers how to incorporate social and emotional learning into a busy day and then extend these skills to literacy lessons for young children. Through simple activities such as read-alouds, sing-alongs, murals, and performances, students learn how to get along in a group, empathize with others, develop self-control, and give and receive feedback, all while becoming confident readers and writers. As Buckley shares, "Every day we ask young children to respectfully converse, question, debate, and collaborate about literature, science, math problems, history, and more. That's sophisticated stuff and requires sophisticated skills. Social and emotional skills are essential to helping children communicate their knowledge and articulate their questions. We must teach students how to build respectful, caring classroom communities, where students are supported and fully engaged in the learning and everyone can reach their potential." In this fresh and original book, Buckley captures the humor, wonder, honesty, and worries of our youngest learners and helps teachers understand how to harness their creativity and guide their conversations toward richer expressions of knowledge. Teachers of special populations will especially appreciate Buckley's successful strategies for reaching English language learners and children from high-poverty homes who may not have strong foundations for academic discourse. As Buckley reminds us, "By understanding one another--orally and socially at first, then using those community-building exchanges to strengthen the skills of reading and writing--we experience the authentic pride and sweet joys of learning, understanding, and connecting to one another."
The book's original sixteen chapters offer clear and incisive discussions of theory plus practical advice on shared reading, math manipulatives, assessment, parent communication, and more. Three brand-new chapters explore important themes such as classroom procedures, establishing a full-day kindergarten program, and models for social studies and science inquiries. The treatment of language arts is extensive, with new ideas on phonics and more.
Play is an important vehicle for learning in the early years. With intentional planning frameworks, this resource provides teachers with tools and strategies to organize and develop curriculum around high-level, purposeful play. Practical application techniques help teachers create a cycle of planning and observation as they use a play-based curriculum to help young children thrive in the classroom. Gaye Gronlund is an early childhood education consultant who trains early childhood educators across the country. She is the author of six books.
"This book is a gem: vivid, fun and thoughtful. It's like sitting next to a skillful, experienced, focused teacher in a real classroom. Kristi and Christine draw on their years of teaching and their dedication to educating children to help students become more empathic and act more thoughtfully and to prepare them with the essentials for success in an uncertain future." -Arthur Costa, author of Learning and Leading with Habits of Mind We know how to teach content and skills. But can we teach the habits of mind needed for academic success, a love of learning, and agency in the world? We can, and A Mindset for Learning shows us how. "We want our students to take on challenges with zeal," write Kristi Mraz and Christine Hertz, "to see themselves not as static test scores but as agents of change." Drawing on the work of Carol Dweck, Daniel Pink, Art Costa, and others, Kristi and Christine show us how to lead students to a growth mindset for school-and life-by focusing on five crucial, research-driven attitudes: optimism-putting aside fear and resistance to learn something new persistence-keeping at it, even when a task is hard flexibility-trying different ways to find a solution resilience-bouncing back from setbacks and learning from failure empathy-learning by putting oneself in another person's shoes. A Mindset for Learning pairs research-psychological, neurological, and pedagogical-with practical classroom help, including instructional language, charts and visuals, teaching tips, classroom vignettes, and more. "This book holds our dreams for all children," write Kristi and Christine, "that they grow to be brave in the face of risk, kind in the face of challenge, joyful and curious in all things." If you want that for your students, then help them discover A Mindset for Learning.
"In her inspirational, well-researched book, Renee describes the kinds of learning opportunities that all parents want for their own children. Her accessible writing style makes it easy to envision the environment, teaching, and community she describes with such clarity you'll want to get started on her ideas tomorrow." -Jennifer Serravallo "How refreshing it is in a test-driven climate to read a book stressing the nurturing of imagination and empathy that comes from inquiry, play and children making choices." -Deborah Meier "The bottom line is when children are at play, they're not just playing--they're learning machines, and play is the engine that drives them." -Renee Dinnerstein How do you define play and choice time in early childhood classrooms? According to Renee Dinnerstein,"During choice time, children choose to play in a variety of centers that have been carefully designed and equipped to scaffold children's natural instinct for play." In Choice Time, Renee gives you everything you need to set up choice-time centers that promote inquiry-based, guided play in your classroom. Renee summarizes the research, describing the different kinds of play and why they are important. Then she dives into the nitty gritty, providing: blueprints for six proven choice-time centers, with variations a guide to arranging your classroom space to maximize play's value and support the child's growing independence scheduling suggestions for different grade levels ideas to connect centers to the curriculum, giving children greater agency in designing and planning centers. Renee reveals what can happen when you embrace a culture of inquiry, providing opportunities for children to be explorative and creative in their thinking. She believes that, "A child's engagement is the most powerful asset we have for teaching and learning." Give your students choice time, and watch them engage in joyful, important, playful, age-appropriate work that will empower them to become lifelong learners.
Hands On, Minds On describes the importance of children's foundational cognitive skills for academic achievement in literacy and mathematics, as well as their connections with other areas of school readiness, including physical health and social and emotional development. It also examines the growing evidence in favour of guided object play.
Describes play workshop experiences that give educators a deeper understanding of play-based learning and illustrate the power of play.
Use fun, engaging activities, grouped according to phonological skills, that build sequentially and reinforce previously learned skills while introducing new skills. The activities include kinesthetic, visual, and aural representations, plus alternative suggestions are provided at the end of each activity to make necessary modifications for diverse learners. Instructions are included for teachers to recognize the needs of different learners. This resource is correlated to the Common Core State Standards. 192 pages plus Teacher Resource CD.
This very important book reaffirms the beauty and uniqueness of children's developing minds and the power that is unleashed when their imaginations are nurtured. -Susan Zimmermann Kindergarten has changed, and not necessarily for the better. Once a joyful time when children grow into school gradually, today it often resembles a watered-down first grade, where academic pressures squelch creativity and play. The Literate Kindergarten shows how carefully balancing academics with song, movement, talk, and play creates an environment where every child can grow and learn. Sue Kempton is a master teacher, and in The Literate Kindergarten, she shares the thinking, the structures, even the precise language she uses to help young children become motivated, engaged, and joyful learners. Kempton guides you through the three domains of learning on which she bases her lessons and actions: the cognitive, creative, and emotional. With this framework in mind, Kempton offers clues to interpreting children's talk and body language so that you know which domain they are engaged in, as well as specific questions and phrases that draw out their thinking and make learning visible. From there, The Literate Kindergarten offers effective suggestions for: establishing routines and creating cooperation developing oral language modeling the language of thinking teaching across content areas supporting students as they become socialized to school recognizing the vital importance of integrating music, movement, and play familiarizing children with concepts of print, comprehension strategies, and other important literacy habits. Discover thoughtful ways to create a safe, nurturing, predictable learning space for children, where their thoughts and feelings are encouraged. Read The Literate Kindergarten and discover a comprehensive resource that can bring joy and serious learning to your classroom.
This practical handbook shows teachers how to nurture a kindergarten learning environment in which children feel safe, comfortable, and able to take risks. It offers innovative ways to encourage children to explore, experiment, discover, solve problems, and freely interact with one another. Based on extensive classroom practice, it demonstrates when teachers need to provide support, ask questions, and provoke thinking, and when they should step back and give children room to explore on their own. This remarkable book offers concrete suggestions for creating play-based learning in a culture of inquiry. It is committed to creating classrooms where children can learn and grow while they play.
Most people know The Second City as an innovative school for improvisation that has turned out leading talents such as Alan Arkin, Bill Murray, Stephen Colbert, and Tina Fey. This groundbreaking company has also trained thousands of educators and students through its Improvisation for Creative Pedagogy program, which uses improv exercises to teach a wide variety of content areas, and boost skills that are crucial for student learning: listening, teamwork, communication, idea-generation, vocabulary, and more.
From the very first chapter of this informative and inspiring book, a clear picture emerges of how even three- and four-year-olds' capacities for serious authorship can and should be supported. - Lillian G. Katz Coauthor of Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years By the time they reach preschool or kindergarten, young children are already writers. They don't have much experience, but they're filled with stories to tell and ideas to express - they want to show the world what they know and see. All they need is a nurturing teacher like you to recognize the writer at work within them. All you need to help them is Already Ready. Taking an exciting, new approach to working with our youngest students, Already Ready shows you how, by respecting children as writers, engaged in bookmaking, you can gently nudge them toward a lifetime of joyful writing. Katie Wood Ray and Matt Glover guide you through fundamental concepts of early writing. Providing numerous, helpful examples of early writing - complete with transcriptions - they demonstrate how to: make sense of children's writing and interpret how they represent sounds, ideas, and images see important developmental signs in writers that you can use to help them grow further recognize the thinking young children engage in and discover that it's the same thinking more experienced writers use to craft purposeful, thoughtful pieces. Then Ray and Glover show you how little ones can develop powerful understandings about: texts and their characteristics the writing process what it means to be a writer. You'll learn how to support your writers' quest to make meaning, as they grow their abilities and refine their thinking about writing through teaching strategies such as: reading aloud working side by side with writers sharing children's writing. Writing is just one part of a busy early childhood classroom, but even in little doses, a nurturing approach can work wonders and help children connect the natural writer inside them to a life of expressing themselves on paper. Find that approach, share it with your students, and you'll discover that you don't have to get students ready to write - they're Already Ready.
Todays kindergarten teachers face enormous challenges to reach district-mandated academic standards. This book presents a model for 21st-century kindergartens that is rooted in child-centered learning and also shaped by the needs and goals of the present day. Classroom teachers working with diverse populations of students and focusing on issues of social justice provide vivid descriptions of classroom life across urban and rural communities. Teacher reflections and commentary from the editors link teacher decisions to principles of good practice. Teaching Kindergarten illustrates how a progressive, learning-centered approach can not only meet the equity and accountability goals of the Common Core State Standards but go well beyond that to educate the whole child.
This newly updated and revised edition of How to Make & Keep Friends: Tips for Kids to Overcome 50 Common Social Challenges By Nadine Briggs and Donna Shea offers social skills and friendship advice presented in an easy to read, reference guide format. Included are simple and immediately actionable tips to navigate common social situations that can be challenging, such as: How to Join a Group How to Safely Handle Angry Feelings Handling Rejection and Exclusion Working Things Out & Sharing Fairly Being a Good Guest and Host Playground Success ... and much more! In this updated edition, we have taken the feedback from our reviews and readers and added the "why" of learning each of these skills is important along with practice questions to inspire discussion and role playing of different social situations with children."
This practical book provides pre- and inservice teachers with an understanding of how math can be learned through play. The author helps teachers to recognize the mathematical learning that occurs during play, to develop strategies for mathematizing that play, and to design formal lessons that make connections between mathematics and play. Common Core State Standards are addressed throughout the text to demonstrate the ways in which play is critical to standards-based mathematics teaching, and to help teachers become more familiar with these standards. Classroom examples illustrate that, unlike most formal tasks, play offers children opportunities to solve nonroutine problems and to demonstrate a variety of mathematical ways of thinking—such as perseverance and attention to precision. This book will help put play back into the early childhood classroom where it belongs. Book Features: Makes explicit connections to play and the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. Offers many examples of free play activities in which mathematics can be highlighted, as well as formal lessons that are inspired by play. Provides strategies for making assessments more playful, helping teachers meet increasing demands for assessment data while also reducing child stress. Includes highlight boxes with recommended resources, questions for reflection, key research findings, vocabulary, lesson plan templates, and more. “This is one of those books that I wish I had written. It is smart, readable, relevant, and authentically focused on children.” —From the Foreword by Elizabeth Graue, Sorenson Professor of Early Childhood Education, University of Wisconsin “In this deceptively easy-to-read book, Amy Parks explains two things that could make a world of difference in early childhood and elementary classrooms: Mathematics isn’t something in a workbook—it’s a fascinating part of the real world; And playing in school isn’t a luxury—it’s an essential context for learning about all sorts of things, including mathematics. Through vignettes of children learning mathematics as they play, Parks helps teachers recognize their ‘answerability to the moment,’ eschewing someone else’s determination of ‘best practice’ in favor of what works with actual children eager to learn mathematics.” —Rebecca New, School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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