What is the state of race relations in the U.S.? Are we making progress toward ending racial discrimination and prejudice? What, exactly, does "race" mean? In Race in the 21st Century: Ethnographic Approaches, Second Edition, John Hartigan, Jr., takes an anthropological look at such questions by introducing students to the study of race through qualitative methods. In the first text to take an explicitly ethnographic approach, Hartigan summarizes and explains the current state of social science knowledge on race in the U.S., motivating students to think through essential questions about race in relation to their own lives. In contrast with many texts, Race in the 21st Century focuses not on essential differences between racial or ethnic groups, but rather on the commonalities. Hartigan concentrates on the particular contexts in which people actively engage and respond to racial meanings and identities. In this way, he encourages readers to think critically about the meaning of race. The second edition of Race in the 21st Century features a new chapter, "Postracial America," which examines contentious arguments about whether or how race still matters in the U.S. today. It engages students fully in the important question of what "postracial America" might mean or look like.
The Neanderthal was more similar to us modern man than we think, he was not a primitive Caveman. He had his own language and a large, if not even sophisticated vocabulary. Archeological findings show that the Neanderthals were capable of complex technical process and that most of his life he spent in a small family group. The authors Thomas Wynn and Frederick L. Coolidge give a fascinating insight into the real life and culture of the Neanderthal.
The disproportionate criminalisation and incarceration of particular minority ethnic groups has long been observed, though much of the work in criminology has been dominated by a somewhat narrow debate. This debate has concerned itself with explaining this disproportionality in terms of structural inequalities and socio-economic disadvantage or discriminatory criminal justice processing. This book offers an accessible and innovative approach, including chapters on anti-Semitism, social cohesion in London, Bradford and Glasgow, as well as an exploration of policing Traveller communities. Incorporating current empirical research and new departures in methodology and theory, this book also draws on a range of contemporary issues such as policing terrorism, immigration detention and youth gangs. In offering minority perspectives on race, crime and justice and white inmate perspectives from the multicultural prison, the book emphasises contrasting and distinctive influences on constructing ethnic identities. It will be of interest to students studying courses in ethnicity, crime and justice.
Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
"Fresh and thought-provoking. McDermott contributes to the understanding of how even small daily encounters can be powerfully affected by racial stereotypes and preconceptions."—Julia Wrigley, author of Other People's Children "A true 'insider's' account of how many whites now live and negotiate the color-line, McDermott deftly lifts the veil of the public ideology of tolerance to reveal the gritty durability of the racial divide. This book provides an important new sociological approach on racial attitudes and relations."—Lawrence D. Bobo, Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial Professor, Stanford University "This bold new urban ethnography reveals the meaning of whiteness for the working class in their everyday lived experiences. McDermott offers an insightful, honest, and comprehensive account of everyday black-white interactions. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the tangled realities of race and class in 21st century America."—Mary C. Waters, author of Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities "Working Class White is an essential read for anyone concerned about the enduring problem of race in America."—Katherine S. Newman, author of Chutes and Ladders: Navigating the Low Wage Labor Market
"This is the book that many of us in the field of race scholarship have been waiting for." - Minelle Mahtani, University of Toronto, Scarborough
Was heißt es, daß wir heute in einem säkularen Zeitalter leben? Was ist geschehen zwischen 1500 – als Gott noch seinen festen Platz im naturwissenschaftlichen Kosmos, im gesellschaftlichen Gefüge und im Alltag der Menschen hatte – und heute, da der Glaube an Gott, jedenfalls in der westlichen Welt, nur noch eine Option unter vielen ist? Um diesen Wandel zu bestimmen und in seinen Folgen für die gegenwärtige Gesellschaft auszuloten, muß die große Geschichte der Säkularisierung in der nordatlantischen Welt von der frühen Neuzeit bis in die Gegenwart erzählt werden – ein herkulisches Unterfangen, dem sich der kanadische Philosoph Charles Taylor in seinem mit Spannung erwarteten neuen Buch stellt. Mit einem Fokus auf dem »lateinischen Christentum«, dem vorherrschenden Glauben in Europa, rekonstruiert er in geradezu verschwenderischem Detail die entscheidenden Entwicklungslinien in den Naturwissenschaften, der Philosophie, der Staats- und Rechtstheorie und in den Künsten. Dem berühmten Diktum von der wissenschaftlich-technischen »Entzauberung der Welt« und anderen eingeschliffenen Säkularisierungstheorien setzt er die These entgegen, daß es die Religion selbst war, die das Säkulare hervorgebracht hat, und entfaltet eine komplexe Mentalitätsgeschichte des modernen Subjekts, das heute im Niemandsland zwischen Glauben und Atheismus gefangen ist.
Cultural Politics and Resistance in the 21st Century demonstrates that twenty-first-century social struggles organize themselves around a distinct set of political discourses and practices. By analyzing the cases present in this volume, the editors develop important steps towards a theory of social change that can adequately address the complex realities and intersectionality of identity (race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality) within and among these new movements.
We Do Language builds on the authors’ highly acclaimed first collaboration, Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools, and examines the need to integrate linguistically informed teaching into the secondary English classroom. The book meets three critical goals for preparing English educators to ensure the academic success of their students. First, the book helps educators acquire a greater knowledge of language variation so they may teach their students to analyze the social, cultural, and linguistic dimensions of the texts they read in class. Second, the chapters provide specific information about language varieties that students bring with them to school so that educators can better assist students in developing the literacy skills necessary for the Common Core State Standards. Third, the text empowers educators to build their linguistic awareness so they may more fully understand, respect, and meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. We Do Language features concrete strategies, models, and vignettes, as well as classroom materials developed by English educators for English educators. It is essential reading for anyone interested in learning about the role that language plays in the experiences of students, both in secondary and postsecondary environments. “Full of advice and support for walking hand-in-hand with students into imaginative ways of understanding the realities of language variation, this book is pure joy for teachers and college counselors. Even more important is the guarantee that when these educators embrace the humanity and philosophy so touchingly illustrated by the authors, the intrigue of thinking deeply about speaking, writing, and reading is sure to follow for students.” —Shirley Brice Heath, Margery Bailey Professor of English & Dramatic Literature and Professor of Linguistics, Emerita, Stanford University “We Do Language is an enabling tool for helping teachers and those who prepare them to face—perhaps better than we ever have—the challenge of schooling in the English/language arts for the 21st century.” —From the Foreword by Jacqueline Jones Royster, Ivan Allen Chair in Liberal Arts and Technology and Dean, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Institute of Technology “Long overdue and much needed. African American English is here to stay, and this book affirms and supports educators and African American students, their language, and their culture. I can't thank the authors enough for writing this powerful, thought provoking, and critical analysis of language variation.” —Donna Ford, Harvie Branscomb Distinguished Professor of Special Education and Teaching and Learning, Peabody College of Education, Vanderbilt University Anne H. Charity Hudley is associate professor of education, English, linguistics, and Africana studies at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Christine Mallinson is associate professor in the Language, Literacy, and Culture Program and affiliate associate professor in the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County (UMBC).
What is a Canadian critical race feminism? As the contributors to this book note, the interventions of Canadian critical race feminists work to explicitly engage the Canadian state as a white settler society. The collection examines Indigenous peoples within the Canadian settler state and Indigenous women within feminism; the challenges posed by the settler state for women of colour and Indigenous women; and the possibilities and limits of an anti-colonial praxis. Critical race feminism, like critical race theory more broadly, interrogates questions about race and gender through an emancipatory lens, posing fundamental questions about the persistence if not magnification of race and the “colour line” in the twenty-first century. The writers of these articles whether exploring campus politics around issues of equity, the media’s circulation of ideas about a tolerant multicultural and feminist Canada, security practices that confine people of colour to spaces of exception, Indigenous women’s navigation of both nationalism and feminism, Western feminist responses to the War on Terror, or the new forms of whiteness that persist in ideas about a post-racial world or in transnational movements for social justice insist that we must study racialized power in all its gender and class dimensions. The contributors are all members of Researchers and Academics of Colour for Equity.
This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.
Ausgezeichnet mit dem Man Booker Prize Jamaika, 1976: Sieben bewaffnete Männer dringen in das Haus des Reggae-Musikers Bob Marley ein und eröffnen das Feuer. Marleys Manager wirft sich schützend über ihn und erleidet dabei lebensgefährliche Verletzungen. Marleys Frau Rita wird ebenfalls schwer verwundet, er selbst bleibt mit leichteren Verletzungen an Armen und Brust zurück. Wer waren die Täter? Was waren ihre Motive? Ausgehend von dem Attentat und den Spekulationen, die sich darum ranken, entwirft Marlon James ein vielseitiges Stimmungsbild Jamaikas in den 70er und 80er Jahren voll Gewalt, politischer Willkür, Drogen und Intrigen, ausgestaltet bis ins kleinste Detail.
Amy Chua ist Juraprofessorin in Yale und zweifache Mutter. Ihre Kinder will sie zum Erfolg erziehen - mit allen Mitteln. Und gemäß den Regeln ihrer Wurzeln in China ist Erfolg nur mit härtester Arbeit zu erreichen. Sie beschließt, dass ihre Töchter als Musikerinnen Karriere machen sollen. Nun wird deren Kindheit zur Tortur. Wo eine Eins minus als schlechte Note gilt, muss Lernen anders vermittelt werden als in unserer westlichen Pädagogik. In ihrem Erlebnisbericht erzählt die Autorin fesselnd, witzig und mit kluger Offenheit von einem gnadenlosen Kampf, der ihr und ihren Töchtern alles abverlangte: ein packendes und hochkomisches Buch über Familie und Erziehung, über Leistungsdruck und über den Willen, unbedingt zu siegen.
Race in 21st Century America tackles the problematic and emotionally laden idea of race in the United States; it brings together intellectuals and scholar activists who present critical and often conflicting appraisals of how race remains a central component of the nation's social landscape and political culture, and shows how Americans might begin to move beyond the strictures of race and racism.
Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.
Africa has the longest and arguably the most diverse archaeological record of any of the continents. It is where the human lineage first evolved and from where Homo sapiens spread across the rest of the world. Later, it witnessed novel experiments in food-production and unique trajectories to urbanism and the organisation of large communities that were not always structured along strictly hierarchical lines. Millennia of engagement with societies in other parts of the world confirm Africa's active participation in the construction of the modern world, while the richness of its history, ethnography, and linguistics provide unusually powerful opportunities for constructing interdisciplinary narratives of Africa's past. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and up-to-date synthesis of African archaeology, covering the entirety of the continent's past from the beginnings of human evolution to the archaeological legacy of European colonialism. As well as covering almost all periods and regions of the continent, it includes a mixture of key methodological and theoretical issues and debates, and situates the subject's contemporary practice within the discipline's history and the infrastructural challenges now facing its practitioners. Bringing together essays on all these themes from over seventy contributors, many of them living and working in Africa, it offers a highly accessible, contemporary account of the subject for use by scholars and students of not only archaeology, but also history, anthropology, and other disciplines.

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