The hugely popular 2018 annual from the Racing Post contains all the best stories of 2017 and a look ahead to 2018. Stunningly illustrated throughout by award-winning photographer Edward Whitaker, this is a must-have for any horse racing fan.
You might feel sure that a horse is not a Flamingo, a Polar Bear, a Tomato, a Teapot, a pair of Bootlaces, a Taxidermist, a Rat Catcher, or a Flea, but you'd be wrong. Racehorse owners often give their horses bizarre names that would seem to make success impossible. Luckily, thoroughbreds are able to defy such handicaps. A Spaniel has won the Derby (1831), a Crow the St Leger (1976), a Butterfly the Oaks (1860) and, difficult to imagine, Oscar Wilde the Welsh National (1958). It's bonkers. Bonkers won at Southwell in 2002. Over the centuries there have been hundreds of thousands of different names bestowed or inflicted on racehorses, and in Fifty Shades Of Hay, David Ashforth has picked out a selection to baffle, surprise, and amuse in equal measure.
The official BHA results for all flat racing in 2009. It includes all the statistics for the 2009 season, including comments on each horse and race comment.
Patrice des Moutis was a handsome, charming and well educated Frenchman with an aristocratic family, a respectable insurance business, and a warm welcome in the smartest Parisian salons. He was also a compulsive gambler and illegal bookie. Between the late 1950s and the early 1970s, des Moutis made a daring attempt to beat the French state-run betting system. With a genius for mathematics and a deep love and understanding of the horse-racing world – not to mention excellent relationships with all the top trainers and jockeys – he applied himself to his task with vigour and meticulous research. A series of spectacular coups netted him (and his friends, with whom he generously shared his predictions) the equivalent of millions of pounds, and soon saw him nicknamed Monsieur X and hailed as a hero by a public desperate to see someone get one over on the state. Des Moutis' success so alarmed the authorities that they repeatedly changed the rules of betting in an effort to stop him. And so a battle of wills began, all played out on the front pages of the daily newspapers as the general public willed des Moutis on to ever greater successes. He remained one step ahead of the authorities until finally the government criminalised his activities, driving him into the arms of the underworld. Eventually the net began to close, high-profile characters found themselves the target of the state's investigation, and people began turning up dead. This long-running cat and mouse game – with the law on one side and des Moutis and the gangsters on the other – is a dazzling tale of glamour, riches, violence and ultimately tragedy.
Looks at horserace betting. This title includes: the winning approach to betting on the Classics and the big festivals by Pricewise; the types of races and horses that are best for betting by The Racing Post handicappers, consistently the most successful tipping team; and, how to spot a potential winner by a senior Racing Post race-reader.
“Moonshiners put more time, energy, thought, and love into their cars than any racer ever will. Lose on the track and you go home. Lose with a load of whiskey and you go to jail.” —Junior Johnson, NASCAR legend and one-time whiskey runner Today’s NASCAR is a family sport with 75 million loyal fans, which is growing bigger and more mainstream by the day. Part Disney, part Vegas, part Barnum & Bailey, NASCAR is also a multibillion-dollar business and a cultural phenomenon that transcends geography, class, and gender. But dark secrets lurk in NASCAR’s past. Driving with the Devil uncovers for the first time the true story behind NASCAR’s distant, moonshine-fueled origins and paints a rich portrait of the colorful men who created it. Long before the sport of stock-car racing even existed, young men in the rural, Depression-wracked South had figured out that cars and speed were tickets to a better life. With few options beyond the farm or factory, the best chance of escape was running moonshine. Bootlegging offered speed, adventure, and wads of cash—if the drivers survived. Driving with the Devil is the story of bootleggers whose empires grew during Prohibition and continued to thrive well after Repeal, and of drivers who thundered down dusty back roads with moonshine deliveries, deftly outrunning federal agents. The car of choice was the Ford V-8, the hottest car of the 1930s, and ace mechanics tinkered with them until they could fly across mountain roads at 100 miles an hour. After fighting in World War II, moonshiners transferred their skills to the rough, red-dirt racetracks of Dixie, and a national sport was born. In this dynamic era (1930s and ’40s), three men with a passion for Ford V-8s—convicted criminal Ray Parks, foul-mouthed mechanic Red Vogt, and crippled war veteran Red Byron, NASCAR’s first champion—emerged as the first stock car “team.” Theirs is the violent, poignant story of how moonshine and fast cars merged to create a new sport for the South to call its own. Driving with the Devil is a fascinating look at the well-hidden historical connection between whiskey running and stock-car racing. NASCAR histories will tell you who led every lap of every race since the first official race in 1948. Driving with the Devil goes deeper to bring you the excitement, passion, crime, and death-defying feats of the wild, early days that NASCAR has carefully hidden from public view. In the tradition of Laura Hillenbrand’s Seabiscuit, this tale not only reveals a bygone era of a beloved sport, but also the character of the country at a moment in time. From the Hardcover edition.
Ranch roping is at the heart of all ranch work, and unlike the rodeo variation of calf roping, the “vacquero” tradition calls for techniques that result in a skillful and graceful throw and catch. Buck Brannaman, a world-renowned master of the art, describes the essential tools, the partnership between horse and rider (incorporating the Natural Horsemanship approach for which the author is famous), and the mechanics needed to become a successful ranch roper, whether in competition or in actual cattle work. One-hundred full-color photographs of Buck in action enhance the step-by-step methodology that leads to mastering this essential Western skill. Whether you ride or rope or just wish you could, here's a book for everyone who is captivated by Western traditions and contemporary life.
Take pole position to learn the ground rules, techniques and procedures of driving perception and evaluation. Racing professional Carroll Smith delivers current state-of-the-art techniques for working with your crew to develop and set up your car so that you'll have a competitive tool with which to practice the art of driving.
Now in its seventh edition, The Complete Encyclopedia of Horse Racing is an authoritative and comprehensive illustrated work of reference. The book tells the story of the "sport of kings" from its earliest inceptions to the present day. It provides essential information on all the top jockeys and the leading owners and trainers and the famous horses. Every personality (human and equine), event and issue of importance in the history of both flat racing and steeplechasing will be referred to somewhere in the book. In addition, the off-track world of racing will be explored through the chapters dealing with gambling, scandals and disasters, social and cultural aspects, media coverage and the business of the racing. Written by two acknowledged authorities on the racing scene, this book is the definitive work on "the horses", with every page a visually exciting and information-packed celebration of the sport. Revised and updated to include the latest crop of superstars, including US Triple Crown winner American Pharoah and Melbourne Cup-winning jockey Michelle Payne, this book continues to be as invaluable to the fan who follows racing on television as it will be for the serious student, administrator and the media.

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