Radical Criminology, edited by Jeff Shantz [Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Vancouver, British Columbia], is dedicated to bridging the gap between the academy and the global activist community, especially with regard to state violence, state-corporate crime, the growth of surveillance regimes, and the prison-industrial complex. More pointedly, the journal aims to be not simply a project of critique, but is also geared toward a praxis of struggle, insurgence, and practical resistance. Issue 5 (Autumn 2015) is a special issue on "Public Criminology II" guest-edited by Carrie Sanders and Lauren Eisler.TABLE OF CONTENTS: EDITORIAL / Jeff Shantz, "Time for Criminology: The Established is not Enough" -- FEATURED ARTICLES: PUBLIC CRIMINOLOGY II / Carrie B. Sanders & Lauren Eisler, "Critical Reflections on 'Public Criminology': An Introduction" -- Christopher J. Schneider, "Public Criminology and the 2011 Vancouver Riot: Public Perceptions of Crime and Justice in the 21st Century" -- Pauline K. Brennan, Meda Chesney-Lind, Abby L. Vandenberg, and Timbre Wulf-Ludden, "THE SAVED and the DAMNED: Racialized Media Constructions of Female Drug Offenders" -- Bernard Schissel, "The Plight of Children and Youth: A Human Rights Study" -- COMMENTARIES: PUBLIC CRIMINOLOGY II / Jeff Ferrell, "Drift: A Criminology of the Contemporary Crisis" -- Andrew D. Hathaway, "Public Criminology in an Age of Austerity: Reflections from the Margins of Drug Policy Research" -- Patricia G. Erickson, "Social Regulation of Drugs: The New "Normal"? -- ARTS & CULTURE / Marc James Léger, "What Is a Rebel? A Conversation with Guillermo Trejo" -- BOOK REVIEWS / Re-reading Foucault: On Law, Power and Rights [Ben Golder, Editor], reviewed by Irina Ceric -- "Too Asian?" Racism, Privilege, and Post-Secondary Education [RJ Gilmour, Davina Bhandar, Jeet Heer, and Michael C.K. MA., Editors], reviewed by Jakub Burkowicz -- Youth in revolt: Reclaiming a democratic future [Henry A. Giroux], reviewed by Jamie Thomas
Comprehensive and accessible, Tim Newburn’s bestselling Criminology provides an introduction to the fundamental themes, concepts, theories, methods and events that underpin the subject and form the basis for all undergraduate degree courses and modules in Criminology and Criminal Justice. This third edition includes: A new chapter on politics, reflecting the ever increasing coverage of political influence and decision making on criminology courses New and updated crime data and analysis of trends, plus new content on recent events such as the Volkswagen scandal, the latest developments on historic child abuse, as well as extended coverage throughout of the English riots A fully revised and updated companion website, including exam, review and multiple choice questions, a live Twitter feed from the author providing links to media and academic coverage of events related to the concepts covered in the book, together with links to a dedicated textbook Facebook page Fully updated to reflect recent developments in the field and extensively illustrated, this authoritative text, written by a leading criminologist and experienced lecturer, is essential reading for all students of Criminology and related fields.
Radical Environmentalism: Nature, Identity and More-than-human Agency provides a unique account of environmentalism - one that highlights the voices of activists and the nature they defend. It will be of interest to both students and academics in green criminology, environmental sociology and nature-human studies more broadly.
For a free 30-day online trial to this title, visit www.sagepub.com/freetrial This two-volume set is designed to serve as a reference source for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary criminological theory. Drawing together a team of international scholars, it examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them, presenting them in a context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. The work provides essays on cutting-edge research as well as concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Topics include contexts and concepts in criminological theory, the social construction of crime, policy implications of theory, diversity and intercultural contexts, conflict theory, rational choice theories, conservative criminology, feminist theory, and more. Key ThemesThe Classical School of CriminologyThe Positivist School of CriminologyEarly American Theories of CrimeBiological and Biosocial Theories of CrimePsychological Theories of CrimeThe Chicago School of CriminologyCultural and Learning Theories of CrimeAnomie and Strain Theories of Crime and DevianceControl Theories of CrimeLabeling and Interactionist Theories of CrimeTheories of the Criminal SanctionConflict, Radical, and Critical Theories of CrimeFeminist and Gender-Specific Theories of CrimeChoice and Opportunity Theories of CrimeMacro-Level/ Community Theories of CrimeLife-Course and Developmental Theories of CrimeIntegrated Theories of CrimeTheories of White-Collar and Corporate CrimeContemporary Gang TheoriesTheories of Prison Behavior and InsurgencyTheories of Fear and Concern About Crime
This text contains a variety of works that represent the radical tradition within criminology and criminal justice. The essays provide some background into radical assumptions, feature contemporary advances, include empirical examinations and illustrate substantive issues.
First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
First published in 1975, this collection of essays expands upon the themes and ideas developed in the editors' previous work, the visionary and groundbreaking text: The New Criminology. Directed at orthodox criminology, this is a partisan work written by a group of criminologists committed to a social transformation: a transformation to a society that does not criminalize deviance. Included are American contributions, particularly from the School of Criminology at Berkeley, represented by Hermann and Julia Schwendinger and Tony Platt, together with essays by Richard Quinney and William Chambliss. From Britain, Geoff Pearson considers deviancy theory as 'misfit sociology' and Paul Hirst attacks deviancy theory from an Althusserian Marxist position. The editors contribute a detailed introductory essay extending the position developed in The New Criminology, and two other pieces which attempt to continue the task of translating criminology from its traditional correctionalist stance to a commitment to socialist diversity and a crime-free set of social arrangements.
The third edition of this text defines radical criminology as a way of doing criminology that frames the problem of crime in terms of class, race, gender, culture and history. Whereas the preceding edition, published in 1989, viewed social class as the central focus of radical criminology, over the past decade the scope of radical criminology has expanded to include race, gender, culture, history, post-modernism and left-realism, among other movements.
Understanding crime, criminals, and criminal justice from a radical/critical perspective is indispensable in today's academic, applied research, and policy sectors. Neglect of this approach leads to narrow-mindedness and the probability of repeating past mistakes or reinventing the wheel. Cutting the Edge by Jeffrey Ian Ross will encourage individuals and organizations, especially students and instructors, to innovatively identify ways of experimenting with new policy initiatives designed to improve not only criminal justice, but social and human justice as well. Ross has significantly changed this volume to include six new chapters and three revised ones as well. The studies chosen demonstrate the difference between critical criminology and other approaches used to study and explain criminological phenomena. The authors do not approach the inequalities of the criminal justice system as phenomena that should be studied, but as wrongs that must be righted. Cutting-edge critical criminology combines concerns about fairness in punishment, tools of class analysis and the insights of feminism, postmodernism, and ethnography. The authors included here wield these newer tools with elegance and enthusiasm. Written with passion by experts in the field, the book engages the mind as fully as it engages the emotions.
This text offers an engaging and wide-ranging account of crime and criminology. It provides a clear and comprehensive consideration of the theoretical, practical, and political aspects of the subject, including the influence of physical, biological, psychological, and social factors on criminality.
Downes and Rock's popular textbook, Understanding Deviance provides the reader with an indispensable guide to criminological theory. It sympathetically outlines the principal theories of crime and rule-breaking, discussing them chronologically, and placing them in their European and NorthAmerican contexts, confronting major criticisms that have been voiced against them, and constructing defences where appropriate. The book has been thoroughly revised and brought up to date to include new issues of crime, deviance and theory in the early twenty-first century, and includes summaries of cultural criminology and the work of Laub and Sampson, and Gottfredson and Hirschi, on control theory.
First published in 1975, this collection of essays expands upon the themes and ideas developed in the editors’ previous work, the visionary and groundbreaking text: The New Criminology. Directed at orthodox criminology, this is a partisan work written by a group of criminologists committed to a social transformation: a transformation to a society that does not criminalize deviance. Included are American contributions, particularly from the School of Criminology at Berkeley, represented by Hermann and Julia Schwendinger and Tony Platt, together with essays by Richard Quinney and William Chambliss. From Britain, Geoff Pearson considers deviancy theory as ‘misfit sociology’ and Paul Hirst attacks deviancy theory from an Althusserian Marxist position. The editors contribute a detailed introductory essay extending the position developed in The New Criminology, and two other pieces which attempt to continue the task of translating criminology from its traditional correctionalist stance to a commitment to socialist diversity and a crime-free set of social arrangements.
Key Perspectives in Criminology is not simply a dictionary of criminology, but a welcome introduction for those with a genuine interest in the terms, concepts, themes and debates in the field.
Titles: v.3 Facts, frameworks, and forecasts ; v.4 New directions in criminological theory.
The Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology is a collection of original essays specifically designed to offer students, faculty, policy makers, and others an in-depth overview of the most up-to-date empirical, theoretical, and political contributions made by critical criminologists around the world. Special attention is devoted to new theoretical directions in the field, such as cultural criminology, masculinities studies, and feminist criminologies. Its diverse essays not only cover the history of critical criminology and cutting edge theories, but also the variety of research methods used by leading scholars in the field and the rich data generated by their rigorous empirical work. In addition, some of the chapters suggest innovative and realistic short- and long-term policy proposals that are typically ignored by mainstream criminology. These progressive strategies address some of the most pressing social problems facing contemporary society today, and that generate much pain and suffering for socially and economically disenfranchised people. The Handbook explores up-to-date empirical, theoretical, and political contributions, and is specifically designed to be a comprehensive resource for undergraduate and post-graduate students, researchers, and policy makers.
A basic guide - written with newcomers, lay people and those working within the criminal justice field in mind. Acquaint yourself with some key strands of this literally enormous topic and how it interacts with real life situations by reading the chapters of this book as follows: 1. Introduction 2. Classicism 3. Positivism 4. Strain Theories 5. Control Theories 6. Gender, Subcultures, Labelling and Differential Association 7. Conflict and Radical Criminology 8. Victimology, Fear of Crime, Restorative Justice - and A Look at Some Statistics 9. Criminology: Aspects of Criminal Justice (Criminal Justice Models; Police, Policing and Law and Order; Public Disorder; Bail or Custody; Punishment and Sentencing; Prisons; Crime Prevention and Community Safety; White Collar Crime). Plus a brief Bibliography. Reviews 'Most helpful and readable . . . . fascinating and thought-provoking': The Magistrate

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