Wie kommt man zum Radio? Wie arbeitet man beim Radio? Was müssen Sie lernen und können, um beim Radio erfolgreich zu sein? "Radio-Journalismus" beschreibt, was Sie brauchen und wie es geht: Sprache und Sprechen (u.a. Moderation) - Beiträge (Umfrage, O-Ton-Bericht, Interview usw.) - Sendungen (z.B. Magazin) - Produktion und Technik (z.B. an der Workstation schneiden und produzieren, Sendung fahren) - Alle Ausbildungswege.?
Gatewatching: Collaborative Online News Production is the first comprehensive study of the latest wave of online news publications. The book investigates the collaborative publishing models of key news Websites, ranging from the worldwide Indymedia network to the massively successful technology news site Slashdot, and further to the multitude of Weblogs that have emerged in recent years. Building on collaborative approaches borrowed from the open source software development community, this book illustrates how gatewatching provides an alternative to gatekeeping and other traditional journalistic models of reporting, and has enabled millions of users around the world to participate in the online news publishing process.
This text explores the changing nature of warfare in the post-Cold War era. It examines the emergence of new forms of warfare in which warlords, mercenaries and terrorists play an increasingly important role.
World Television: From Global to Local, a new assessment of the interdependence of television across cultures and nations brings together the most current research and theories on the subject. By examining recent developments in the world system of television as well as several theories of culture, industry, genre, and audience, author Joseph D. Straubhaar offers new insights into the topic. He argues that television is being simultaneously globalized, regionalized, nationalized, and even localized, with audiences engaging it at multiple levels of identity and interest; therefore the book looks at all these levels of operation. Key Features Draws upon both international communication and cultural studies perspectives: Presents a new model is presented that attempts to move beyond the current controversies about imperialism and globalization. Looks at historical patterns: Historical patterns across cultures and countries help compare where television has been and where it is going. Takes a contemporary focus: Uses of technology, flows and patterns of program development, genres of television, the interaction of producers and audiences, and patterns of audience choice among emerging alternatives are examined. Explores how the audience for these evolving forms of television is structured: The effects of these forces or patterns of television have on both cultural formations and individual identities are identified. Intended Audience This is an excellent text for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in Globalizatiion and Culture, Global Media, Television Studies, Television Criticism, and International Media.
Journalism is in transition. Irrevocable decisions are being made, often based on flimsy evidence, which could change not only the future of journalism, but also the future of democracy. This book, based on extensive research, provides the opportunity to reflect upon these decisions and considers how journalism could change for the better and for the good of democracy. It covers: the business landscape work and employment the regulatory framework audiences and interaction the impact of technology on practices and content ethics in a converged world The book analyses research in both national and local journalism, broadcast, newspaper and online journalism, broadsheet and tabloid, drawing comparisons between the different outlets in the field of news journalism, making this essential reading for scholars and students of journalism and media studies.
This Handbook encapsulates the intellectual history of mass media ethics over the past twenty-five years. Chapters serve as a summary of existing research and thinking in the field, as well as setting agenda items for future research. Key features include: up-to-date and comprehensive coverage of media ethics, one of the hottest topics in the media community 'one-stop shopping' for historical and current research in media ethics experienced, top-tier editors, advisory board, and contributors. It will be an essential reference on media ethics theory and research for scholars, graduate students, and researchers in media, mass communication, and journalism.
In Transcultural Communication, Andreas Hepp provides an accessible and engaging introduction to the exciting possibilities and inevitable challenges presented by the proliferation of transcultural communication in our mediatized world. Includes examples of mediatization and transcultural communication from a variety of cultural contexts Covers an array of different types of media, including mass media and digital media Incorporates discussion of transcultural communication in media regulation, media production, media products and platforms, and media appropriation
There is no doubt, journalism faces challenging times. Since the turn of the millennium, the financial health of the news industry is failing, mainstream audiences are on the decline, and professional authority, credibility and autonomy are eroding. The outlook is bleak and it's understandable that many are pessimistic. But this book argues that we have to rethink journalism fundamentally. Rather than just focus on the symptoms of the 'crisis of journalism', this collection tries to understand the structural transformation journalism is undergoing. It explores how the news media attempts to combat decreasing levels of trust, how emerging forms of news affect the established journalistic field, and how participatory culture creates new dialogues between journalists and audiences. Crucially, it does not treat these developments as distinct transformations. Instead, it considers how their interrelation accounts for both the tribulations of the news media and the need for contemporary journalism to redefine itself.
"Every serious student of journalism should read this book... Denis McQuail has succeeded in producing a work of scholarship that shows what journalists do and what they should do." - Stephen Coleman, University of Leeds "For a half century we have spoken earnestly of journalism's responsibility to society instead of to business and government. Now this concept is given sophistication unmatched, by the best scholar of media theory of his generation." - Clifford Christians, University of Illinois "The grand old man of communication theory presents an overarching social theory of journalism that goes beyond the usual Anglo-American focus." - Jo Bardoel, University of Amsterdam (ASCoR) and Nijmegen "This book deals with the eternal question of how journalism is linked to society... I cannot think of a better staple food for students of journalism at all levels." - Kaarle Nordenstreng, University of Tampere This is a major new statement on the role of journalism in democracy from one of media and communication's leading thinkers. Denis McQuail leads the reader through a systematic exploration of how and why journalism and society have become so inextricably entwined and - as importantly - what this relationship should be like. It is a strong re-statement of the fundamental values that journalism aspires to. Written for students, this book: Makes the theory accessible and relevant Teaches the importance of journalism to power and politics Explores the status and future of journalism as a profession Outlines the impact and consequences of the digital Reveals journalism as it is, but also as it should be Takes each chapter further with guided reading list and free online journal articles. This textbook is the perfect answer to the how and why of journalism. It is crucial reading for any student of media studies, communication studies and journalism.
Originally published in 1986, this work examines how key figures such as Garfinkel, Sacks and Cicourel have revolutionised thinking about how sociology's presuppositions about 'being social' are grounded. Yet until the appearance of this book there were no clear and authoritative introductions to the main thinkers in the field or their work. In assessing the critical reception of Ethnomethodology, Sharrock and Anderson argue persuasively that much is wide of the mark - as they say, the real argument has yet to begin.
Since 1989, there have been over 200 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States. On the surface, the release of innocent people from prison could be seen as a victory for the criminal justice system: the wrong person went to jail, but the mistake was fixed and the accused set free. A closer look at miscarriages of justice, however, reveals that such errors are not aberrations but deeply revealing, common features of our legal system. The ten original essays in When Law Fails view wrongful convictions not as random mistakes but as organic outcomes of a misshaped larger system that is rife with faulty eyewitness identifications, false confessions, biased juries, and racial discrimination. Distinguished legal thinkers Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., and Austin Sarat have assembled a stellar group of contributors who try to make sense of justice gone wrong and to answer urgent questions. Are miscarriages of justice systemic or symptomatic, or are they mostly idiosyncratic? What are the broader implications of justice gone awry for the ways we think about law? Are there ways of reconceptualizing legal missteps that are particularly useful or illuminating? These instructive essays both address the questions and point the way toward further discussion. When Law Fails reveals the dramatic consequences as well as the daily realities of breakdowns in the law’s ability to deliver justice swiftly and fairly, and calls on us to look beyond headline-grabbing exonerations to see how failure is embedded in the legal system itself. Once we are able to recognize miscarriages of justice we will be able to begin to fix our broken legal system. Contributors: Douglas A. Berman, Markus D. Dubber, Mary L. Dudziak, Patricia Ewick, Daniel Givelber, Linda Ross Meyer, Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., Austin Sarat, Jonathan Simon, and Robert Weisberg.
Given the interdisciplinary nature of digital journalism studies and the increasingly blurred boundaries of journalism, there is a need within the field of journalism studies to widen the scope of theoretical perspectives and approaches. Theories of Journalism in a Digital Age discusses new avenues in theorising journalism, and reassesses established theories. Contributors to this volume describe fresh concepts such as de-differentiation, circulation, news networks, and spatiality to explain journalism in a digital age, and provide concepts which further theorise technology as a fundamental part of journalism, such as actants and materiality. Several chapters discuss the latitude of user positions in the digitalised domain of journalism, exploring maximal–minimal participation, routines–interpretation–agency, and mobility–cross-mediality–participation. Finally, the book provides theoretical tools with which to understand, in different social and cultural contexts, the evolving practices of journalism, including innovation, dispersed gatekeeping, and mediatized interdependency. The chapters in this book were originally published in special issues of Digital Journalism and Journalism Practice.
The use of digital technology has transformed the way news is produced, distributed, and received. Just as media organizations and journalists have realized that technology is a central and indispensable part of their enterprise, scholars of journalism have shifted their focus to the role of technology. In Remaking the News, leading scholars chart the future of studies on technology and journalism in the digital age. These ongoing changes in journalism invite scholars to rethink how they approach this dynamic field of inquiry. The contributors consider theoretical and methodological issues; concepts from the social science canon that can help make sense of journalism; the occupational culture and practice of journalism; and major gaps in current scholarship on the news: analyses of inequality, history, and failure. ContributorsMike Ananny, C. W. Anderson, Rodney Benson, Pablo J. Boczkowski, Michael X. Delli Carpini, Mark Deuze, William H. Dutton, Matthew Hindman, Seth C. Lewis, Eugenia Mitchelstein, W. Russell Neuman, Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Zizi Papacharissi, Victor Pickard, Mirjam Prenger, Sue Robinson, Michael Schudson, Jane B. Singer, Natalie (Talia) Jomini Stroud, Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Rodrigo Zamith
International Media Studies is a bold introduction to the field that focuses on a de-centering of media epistemology to represent a more thorough world-view. A comprehensive textbook exploring the current state of media studies as it is being practised across the world Takes discussions about media studies beyond other textbooks, by situating the subject firmly in an international context appropriate to the globalized, 21st century Surveys our reception of a wide variety of media content and formats including television, magazines, fiction, newspapers, and popular music Considers both theoretical and much-needed ethnographic perspectives on media studies Showcases global and local media patterns in a variety of countries around the world, including examples from Asia, Africa, and Latin America
It’s easy to make a rhetorical case for the value of journalism. Because, it is a necessary precondition for democracy; it speaks to the people and for the people; it informs citizens and enables them to make rational decisions; it functions as their watchdog on government and other powers that be. But does rehashing such familiar rationales bring journalism studies forward? Does it contribute to ongoing discussions surrounding journalism’s viability going forth? For all their seeming self-evidence, this book considers what bearing these old platitudes have in the new digital era. It asks whether such hopeful talk really reflects the concrete roles journalism now performs for people in their everyday lives. In essence, it poses questions that strike at the core of the idea of journalism itself. Is there a singular journalism that has one well-defined role in society? Is its public mandate as strong as we think? The internationally-renowned scholars comprising the collection address these recurring concerns that have long-defined the profession and which journalism faces even more acutely today. By discussing what journalism was, is, and (possibly) will be, this book highlights key contemporary areas of debate and tackles on-going anxieties about its future.
Journalism and mass communications professionals entering the innovative world of new media technology face a wave of challenging and often unanticipated ethical quandaries. Digital Dilemmas: Ethical Issues for Online Media Professionals is the first title in Blackwell Publishing's Media and Technology series (Alan B. Albarran, series editor). This important new text establishes a framework for discussing, understanding, and ultimately making sound decisions on meeting these ethical challenges. In addition, the book provides guidelines for approaching and making decisions from an ethical standpoint. Part one of the text gives background and overview information to examine existing professional ethical codes and their applicability in the new media. Part two delves into the ethical dilemmas faced by all online communications professionals—privacy, speech and intellectual property. Part three warns the reader about three specific types of ethical hazards—speed vs. accuracy and quality; validating Internet sources; and blurring editorial with commercial information. Through the use of historical summaries, discussion of specific problems, case study illustrations, critical thinking exercises, chapter summaries, key points, and recommended readings, each chapter comprehensively explores ethical issues. Aimed at students as well as practicing journalists and media professionals, Digital Dilemmas serves as the essential text and user’s guide to the emerging ethical challenges facing those who work or plan to work in the online media.
Rather than compete with tabloid television, Jay Rosen argues in his book, journalists need to repair the disconnect between the press and the public; regarding political coverage in particular, journalists must reshape the narrative of public life.
Critically interrogating the popular concept of cosmopolitanism, this book offers new insight of what it means to be a world citizen today.
For introductory courses in advertising An accessible, well-written, and student-friendly approach to advertising. Advertising tracks the changes in today's dynamic world of media and marketing communication-as well as the implications of these changes to traditional practice-and presents them to students through an accessible, well-written approach. The Tenth edition highlights the increasing importance of consumers as the driving force in today's advertising strategies, social media, and the Internet evolution/revolution. It also includes an increased IMC and brand focus.

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