Limited to 1,000 copies, each numbered and signed by the photographer. A decade after his first TASCHEN book, Deux ex Machina, Ralph Gibson is back, with an extensive collection of nudes, including his best recent work as well as an interview by Eric Fischl. Strikingly contrasted and meticulously composed, Gibsons photographs pay tribute to some of the mediums greatest practitioners, such as Man Ray and Edward Weston, while venturing into uncharted waters. Says Gibson: A photographer once said that beauty in women is endless. Perhaps it was I who said it. In fact, I remember distinctly having done soand the thought persists to this day. We stare in the psychological mirror of the human body with a fascination that endures indefinitely. At least art history indicated this to be so. The Willendorf Venus is said to date from 25,000 BCthat is a old enough for me to believe in the subject. I love photographing women and could say that the form of the female body is absolute and perfect.
In "Refractions," Ralph Gibson compiles his "Notes on the Aesthetics of Photography," a significant contribution to both practical and intellectual considerations for understanding and making photographs. It will be of interest to students, experienced practitioners, teachers, and collectors alike, as it contains the insights of one of the master protagonists of the photographic medium.
Political Abstraction is the name of a recent series of color and black-and-white photographic diptychs by acclaimed fine art photographer Ralph Gibson. In these works, the viewer experiences several simultaneous visual motions dealing with the migration of color and shape across seemingly simple imagery. The series is born out of a response to the search for visual identity in a digital age. Gibson has devoted his pursuit to the idea that the viewer of the work is the actual subject of the piece itself. Thus, the photographs are relative but not restricted to the intention of the subject or the photographer. These works have been made during travels in eight countries, yet they remain remarkably unified in their perception. In this way, Gibson's visual signature remains intact throughout the entire series.
Perfectly IntimateThe infinite subtlety of the female form Sensual and softly surreal, the nude photography of Ralph Gibson frames the female form both organically and graphically, referencing art history while also innovating in the arena of erotic imagery, at once summoning visceral sensation and calling out for tactile attention. Thumb through this exquisite tribute to the contours and curves of womanhood and experience the intimacy of the photographic lens. Reviving TASCHEN's sold-out Collector's Edition, this tribute gathers the best of Gibson's exquisite nudes alongside some of his most recent works in an accessible, revised format, complete with a fresh in-depth interview by Eric Fischl. Strikingly graphic, meticulously composed, and loaded with subtle provocations, the master photographer's mysterious, dreamlike images pay homage to greats such as Man Ray and Edward Weston, while continually pursuing new frontiers. "A photographer once said that beauty in women is endless. Perhaps it was I who said it. [...] I love photographing women and could say that the form of the female body is absolute and perfect." --Ralph Gibson "Ralph Gibson practices the nude like a musician tirelessly rehearsing his scales. A beautiful, imposing book." -- NUMERO, Paris
This volume presents the 92 most significant pictorial compositions of Ralph Gibson. His raw materials are the lines and shapes of seemingly mundane objects - a streetlamp, the back of a chair, a wine bottle, a human silhouette against the light. Based upon an unusual black-and-white technique, his photography is metaphorical rather than documentary. The contents of Gibson's pictures are difficult to grasp, often even mysterious. Some compositions seem characterized by unusual control, structure and clarity, while others are opulent, seductive and full of hidden meaning. Gibson celebrates what he sees. The human form is generalized far beyond the concrete-associative representational approach of portraiture. In deliberately overlooking the signs and props of specific locale, Gibson raises individual figures to an abstract level of human existence. His often fragmentary figures draw the viewer's attention to the design and composition of the pictorial details. The organic structure of such pictures clearly suggests that their origins are by no means random. With great precision and without sentimentality he succeeds in making his "message" comprehensible.
An artist-printed signed and numbered silver-gelatin photographic print, eight by ten inches, inside a specially produced clothbound slipcase with a book signed and numbered by the artist.
From Bloomers to Bikinis A treasure trove of vintage erotic photos Sportive gentlemen, lascivious ladies: Since the earliest days of photography, people have been getting up to all manner of rannygazoo in front of the lens. This collection presents the finest highlights from the collection of New Yorker Mark Rotenberg, who began collecting antique smut after finding a stash of vintage erotic pictures in a Brooklyn dumpster and now owns a 95,000 strong collection of archive pornography dating from between 1860 and 1960. Flick through these pages and witness the fitness of our forebears as they romp, cavort, and frolic with unabashed energy and glee. From early monochromes of daringly dropped drawers and seductively waxed handlebar mustaches, to Kodachromes of cheery, twin-peaked pin-up beauties in the 1950s, this fine collection spans the sublimely sensual and the ridiculous. About the series: Bibliotheca Universalis-- Compact cultural companions celebrating the eclectic TASCHEN universe at an unbeatable, democratic price! Since we started our work as cultural archaeologists in 1980, the name TASCHEN has become synonymous with accessible, open-minded publishing. Bibliotheca Universalis brings together nearly 100 of our all-time favorite titles in a neat new format so you can curate your own affordable library of art, anthropology, and aphrodisia. Bookworm's delight -- never bore, always excite! Text in English, French, and German
“Ralph Gibson’s Lustrum Press trilogy of the mid-1970s was immensely popular and influential. . . . Many of the pictures are amongst the most recognizable from the time . . . a surreal dreamscape, gently erotic, with a frisson of danger.” —from The Photobook: A History, Volume 1 by Martin Parr and Gerry Badger An iconic American fine art photographer renowned for his highly surrealist vision, Ralph Gibson is a master of the photography book, which he considers an art form in its own right. In 1970, he founded Lustrum Press, a publishing house dedicated to photography books, and inaugurated it with three volumes—The Somnambulist (1970), Deja-Vu (1973), and Days at Sea (1974)—that showcased his own work in an uncompromisingly radical and demanding way. These books came to be known as Gibson’s “Black Trilogy” and are now considered classics of the twentieth-century photobook genre. Making a clean break with the prior conventions of the photography book, “The Black Trilogy” created a new visual syntax—page layouts, the pairing of photographs face-to-face, graphic and thematic echoes—that provided a unique language for photographic communication. It soon became the model for a generation of young photographers, including Larry Clark, Danny Seymour, Mary Ellen Mark, Yves Guillot, and Arnaud Claass. “The Black Trilogy” volumes went out of print long ago and have become highly collectible. This reissue, with a new essay by the distinguished photographer and curator Gilles Mora, includes all three books in a single volume.
"The Nude lies at the centre of Western art. From the beginning of photography it has attracted photographers, many of whom have imitated the forms and postures portrayed by painters. There are a few moments when a photographer has abandoned derivative styles and allowed the viewer to see the body in completely new manner. This occured in America in the work of Edward Weston and in Britain in the work of Bill Brandt. It now occurs in the photographs of Lee Friedlander. ver the last fifteen years, Friedlander has been working with a number of models to create his own way of seeing and photographing the female nude. Little of this work has ever appeared. The photographs are both highly intimate and coolly detached. The frequently surprising perspectives are balanced by the mundane backdrops of ordinary life, the real domestic interiors of the models. his book is published on the occasion of an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and confirms Friedlander's stature as one of the greatest photographers of his generation. He appears to have taken a primary theme of Western art and re-invented it."
Sometimes a book comes out of a restaurant kitchen that speaks with such simplicity, wisdom, and surprise, that it inspires home cooks to rethink their approach to cooking. Ducksoup is one of these rare books. More than 130 recipes feature seasonal produce, meats, fishes, and cheeses elevated by achievable means. Over 130 color photographs and a design that's as delightfully original as the recipes bring the ambiance of this unique London restaurant— a Soho gem—to life, providing fresh thinking for cooks in kitchens everywhere.
Acclaimed photographer Gibson offers more than 60 intimate black-and-white portraits of guitar masters playing their instruments. Focusing his expert lens on musicians within virtually every genre, Gibson reveals the intense relationship of the player with his beloved "axe."
From Twiggy in the Swinging Sixties to Princess Diana in the 1980s: three decades of legendary British fashion photographer Terence Donovan This is the first book dedicated to the portraiture of legendary photographer Terence Donovan, a genre that spanned the entirety of his four-decade career. During this time he worked for major British and international magazines including Vogue, Marie Claire, Harper's Bazaarand Elle. Donovan undertook numerous private portrait commissions, photographing public figures from the worlds of the arts, politics and business, in addition to members of the British Royal family; his many sitters include Yasser Arafat, Naomi Campbell, Sean Connery, Diana Princess of Wales, Laurence Olivier and Charlotte Rampling. Along with his iconic portraits, this book features unseen work from Donovan's archive, never previously published or exhibited. It also reproduces magazine spreads, contact sheets and pages from diaries and daybooks--rare ephemera that provide a unique insight into Donovan's working practice. Terence Daniel Donovan(1936-96) was born in the East End of London and took his first photo at the age of 15. The bomb-damaged industrial landscape of his hometown became the backdrop of much of his fashion photography, and he set the trend for positioning fashion models in stark and gritty urban environments. Along with David Bailey and Brian Duffy, he captured, and in many ways helped create, the Swinging London of the 1960s. Donovan's passion for photography remained constant throughout his long career. In 1963 he told a young Jean Shrimpton that "photography fascinates me. Instant fascination every time. When the fascination leaves me, I'll give it up." As it never did, neither did he.
Le Flaneur, the turn-of-the-century French term for the urban stroller, the street wanderer -- an intellectual with plenty of leisure time to idly traverse the byways of the city, drifting from one quarter to another, making discoveries, meeting old acquaintances, making new ones. It remains the best way to see Paris. This volume of photography is a memoir of numerous walks through the French capital by some great photographers, who set out, like le flaneur, to capture by chance something they had never seen before. These images map and re-map the desired paths and favourite landmarks of one of the most photographed cities in the world, reprinting classic shots from the last two hundred years -- right up to the present day. They poignantly evoke the bars, the cafes, the architecture, the parks and, of course, the vibrancy of the people. Turning the pages is like taking a walk through the history of the city, noting the changes and those elements that are forever Paris -- the tree-lined boulevards, the dimly lit bistros, the narrow passages, and the banks of the River Seine.
The photographer's unique perspective for looking at people and ordinary objects in the environment is revealed in a collection of his work
Astaple of millennial lingo, the term #Sendnudes is used to requiest sexually explicit photograhs, typically over text messaging and dating apps. Over time #Sendnudes has olso evolve into a meme, deployed as a common punchline in image and video internet jokes. Today, #Sendnudes is making another transition - as the title oh a carefully curated book of nude protografy that celebbrates the diversity of female beauty and body confidence.
Here is Robert Alvarado's second collection of pin-up photography. Relying on the subtlest of costuming, which goes a long way to add color, texture, humor, and homage to his images, Alvarado uses this collection to focus more on the female form. As with all of his photography, Alvarado uses innovative techniques in these 145+ pin-up nudes to blur the line that distinguishes a photograph from an illustration. With these techniques, his nod to Alberto Vargas, Gil Elvgren, and other pioneering pin-up artists is clear. But the themes, models, and styling in these alluring and luscious images are also steeped in today's popular culture. From the heavily inked and stilletoed to the sexy Storm Trooper and the traditional innocence of the girl next door, Alvarado's images show the breadth of his creativity and the beauty of his models
In 1953 the writer and curator Nancy Newhall assembled, with the cooperation of the photographer Edward Weston, a mock-up for an elegant book featuring Weston's photographs of the nude. It was the only book on this subject that Weston himself participated in creating. The sample book intersperses landscapes and still lifes with nude studies and includes an essay written by Newhall on the artist's aesthetic. The proposal was rejected in the 1950s, however, by publishers of fine art photographs, who were reluctant to address the subject. In 1985 the mock-up was acquired by the J. Paul Getty Museum with some pages and prints missing, yet it was only in 2006 that curator Brett Abbott recognized the key to reconstructing the unpublished book in its entirety. Now, in association with the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona, the Getty has finally been able to realize Newhall and Weston's vision. The present volume has been produced with distinctions of paper and ink to indicate those elements that have been added-including a preface by the curator and thumbnail reproductions of the mock-up as it now exists-and those elements that were part of the original, including Newhall's essay and all thirty-nine photographs, arranged on the pages as Newhall and Weston had placed them.

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