Researching Human Geography is an essential new text for any geography student about to embark on a research project. An understanding of how different theories of knowledge have influenced research methodologies is crucial in planning and designing effective research; this book makes this link clear and explores how various philosophical positions, from positivism to post-structuralism, have become associated with particular methodologies. The book gives an overview of a wide range of methods and data collection, both quantitative and qualitative, and explores their strengths and weaknesses for different kinds of research. 'Researching Human Geography' also looks at the various techniques available for the analysis of data, which is presented as an integral and ongoing part of the research process. Clearly written, with extensive use of examples from previous research to show 'methodology in action', this new text is an invaluable addition to both the theory and method of research in human geography.
Facts101 is your complete guide to Researching Human Geography. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
This book is a one-stop comprehensive guide to geographical inquiry. A step-by-step account of the hows and the whys of research methodology. Introduces students to the complexities of geographical perspective and thought, essentials of fieldwork, formulation of research topics, data collection, analysis and interpretation as well as presentation and dissemination. Includes inputs and specific examples to help practitioners negotiate between theory and practice. Uses a lucid, engaging and literary style. It will be an essential companion for researchers and students of geography, social sciences, and South Asian studies.
Reading this book is your first step to becoming a competent human geography researcher. Whether you are a novice needing practical help for your first piece of research or a professional in search of an accessible guide to best practice, Conducting Research in Human Geography is a unique and indispensable book to have at hand. The book provides a broad overview of theoretical underpinnings in contemporary human geography and links these with the main research methodologies currently being used. It is designed to guide the user through the complete research process, whether it be a one day field study or a large project, from the nurturing of ideas and development of a proposal, to the design of an enquiry, the generation and analysis of data, to the drawing of conclusions and the presentation of findings.
First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Practising Human Geography is critical introduction to disciplinary debates about the practice of human geography, that is informed by an inquiry into how geographers actually do research. In examining those methods and practices that are integral to doing geography, the text presents a theoretically-informed reflection on the construction and interpretation of geographical data - including factual and "fictional" sources; the use of core research methodologies; and the interpretative role of the researcher. Framed by an historical overview how ideas of practising human geography have changed, the following three sections offer an comprehensive and integrated overview of research methodologies. Illustrated throughout, the te
Key Methods in Geography is an introduction for undergraduates to the principal methodological issues involved in the collection, analysis and presentation of geographical information. It provides an accessible primer, which will be used by students as a reference throughout their degree, on all issues from research design to presentation. A unique feature of the book is that it provides definitions of terms from both human geography and physical geography. Organized into four parts: Getting Started in Geographical Research; Data Collection in Human Geography; Data Collection in Physical Geography; Analyzing and Representing Geographical Data. Each chapter is comprised of a short definition, a summary of the principal arguments, a substantive 5,000-word discussion, the use of real-life examples, and annotated notes for further reading. The teaching of research methods is integral in all geography courses. Key Methods in Geography identifies the key analytical and observational strategies with which all geography undergraduates should be conversant.
This book provides undergraduates with a step-by-step guide to successfully carrying out an independent research project or dissertation. The book addresses each stage of the project by answering the questions that a student is likely to ask as the work progresses from choosing the subject area and planning the data collection through to producing illustrations and writing the final report. Most undergraduates in geography and related disciplines are required to undertake individual projects as part of their degree course; this book is a source of constructive, practical advice. This new third edition continues the tradition of friendly, well-informed but informal support, and continues to focus on answering the specific questions that students typically ask at each stage of the project. The new edition brings the text completely up to date by taking into account changes within the discipline and changes in the ways that students work. New digital media, social networking, mobile technology, e-journals, anti-plagiarism software, ethics approval rules and risk assessments are among the issues that this new edition takes into account. The new edition also broadens the book’s appeal by extending its coverage of the wide range of different approaches to geographical research, with expanded coverage of qualitative research, Geographic Information Systems, and new approaches to research design in both physical and human geographies
Research into the ways in which the past is constructed and consumed in the present is now reaching a mature stage. This maturity derives from the general acceptance that heritage as a social and cultural construct is closely connected to the making and maintaining of identity at all spatial scales. This unique book contributes to the developing discourse by focusing on 'heritage from below' in a field where the literature on the relationship between heritage and identity has, rightly, been focused on national identity. Never before have the contemporary manifestations and the theoretical structuring framework of the idea of heritage from below been discussed in the depth offered by this book. The authors first establish the concept and then engage with the actual practice and practitioners of heritage from below in the UK, Europe, Australia and North America.
Approaches to Human Geography is the essential student primer on theory and practice in human geography. It is a systematic review of the key ideas and debates informing post-war geography, explaining how those ideas work in practice. In three sections, the text provides: · A comprehensive contexualising essay: Introducing Philosophies, People and Practices · Philosophies: written by the principal proponents, easily comprehensible accounts of: Positivistic Geographies; Humanism; Feminist Geographies; Marxism; Structuration Theory; Behavioral Geography; Realism; Post Structuralist Theories; Actor-Network Theory; and Post Colonialism · People: prominent geographers explain events that formed their ways of knowing; the section offers situated accounts of theory and practice by, for example: David Ley; Linda McDowell; and David Harvey · Practices: applied accounts of Quantification, Evidence and Positivism; Geographic Information Systems; Humanism; Geography, Political Activism, and Marxism; the Production of Feminist Geographies; Poststructuralist Theory; Environmental Inquiry in a Postcolonial World; Contested Geographies · Student Exercises and Glossary Avoiding jargon - while attentive to the rigor and complexity of the ideas that underlie geographic knowledge – the text is written for students who have not met philosophical or theoretical approaches before. This is a beginning guide to geographic research and practice. Comprehensive and accessible, it will be the core text for courses on Approaches to Human Geography; Philosophy and Geography; and the History of Geography; and a key resource for students beginning research projects.
This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.
`This excellent text will introduce advanced students - and remind senior researchers - of the availability of a broad range of techniques available for the systematic analysis of social data that is not numeric. It makes the key point that neither quantitative nor qualitative methods are interpretive and at the same time demonstrates once and for all that neither a constructivist perspective nor a qualitative approach needs to imply abandonment of rigor. That the chapters are written by different authors makes possible a depth of expertise within each that is unusually strong' - Susanna Hornig Priest, Texas A&M University; Author of `Doing Media Research' Qualitative Researching with Text, Image and Sound off
Doing Development Research is a comprehensive introduction to research in development studies that provides thorough training for anyone carrying out research in developing countries. It brings together experts with extensive experience of overseas research, presenting an interdisciplinary guide to the core methodologies. Informed by years of research experience, this book draws together many strands of action research and participatory methods, demonstrating their diverse applications and showing how they interrelate. Doing Development Research is the essential A-Z of development research.
‘Extends a warm welcome to students who have come face-to-face with the daunting task of producing a dissertation. Written in an accessible and engaging style, it deals with the nitty-gritty of researching the city... a must-have for the student!’ - Kim England, University of Washington ‘An invaluable guide to urban research design for undergraduate and graduate students alike. It provides the novice researcher with a wealth of practical advice on theory, methods, writing style, and everything else one needs to know to design and manage a successful urban research project. I wish this book had been available when I started my research career!' - Byron Miller, University of Calgary ‘Replete with tremendously useful advice and guidance for students of all social-science disciplines undertaking significant research projects on urban issues... students writing undergraduate and master’s theses, or even doctoral dissertations, are likely to find it tremendously useful as well.’ - David L. Imbroscio, University of Louisville This practical guide for students focuses on the city and on the different ways to research it. The authors explains how research is done, from the original idea to design and implementation, through to writing up and representation. Substantive chapters explain each method in detail, from using archival methods, interviews, ethnography, questionnaires, discourse analysis and diaries, to using GIS and visual methods. With real world examples throughout and guided further reading for each chapter, it is an inspiring guide for students carrying out their own research in urban geography, urban planning, urban studies and urban sociology courses.
Maps are changing. They have become important and fashionable once more. Rethinking Maps brings together leading researchers to explore how maps are being rethought, made and used, and what these changes mean for working cartographers, applied mapping research, and cartographic scholarship. It offers a contemporary assessment of the diverse forms that mapping now takes and, drawing upon a number of theoretic perspectives and disciplines, provides an insightful commentary on new ontological and epistemological thinking with respect to cartography. This book presents a diverse set of approaches to a wide range of map forms and activities in what is presently a rapidly changing field. It employs a multi-disciplinary approach to important contemporary mapping practices, with chapters written by leading theorists who have an international reputation for innovative thinking. Much of the new research around mapping is emerging as critical dialogue between practice and theory and this book has chapters focused on intersections with play, race and cinema. Other chapters discuss cartographic representation, sustainable mapping and visual geographies. It also considers how alternative models of map creation and use such as open-source mappings and map mash-up are being creatively explored by programmers, artists and activists. There is also an examination of the work of various ‘everyday mappers’ in diverse social and cultural contexts. This blend of conceptual chapters and theoretically directed case studies provides an excellent resource suited to a broad spectrum of researchers, advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in human geography, GIScience and cartography, visual anthropology, media studies, graphic design and computer graphics. Rethinking Maps is a necessary and significant text for all those studying or having an interest in cartography.
Explores geographic information available through several sources including the Internet and satellite technology, covering such topics as map basics, geographic information systems, and geographical standards.
What Kind of Regionalism? seeks to explore the value basis of regionalism in two northern European regions. By investigating two less favoured, politically defined regions, the author tries to complement previous accounts of regionalism in western Europe, many of which have revolved either around `ethnic' regions, known for hosting sub-nationalist demands, or around affluent regions in the economic and political centre of Europe. A fundamental assumption in the study is that regionalism can be studied as an instance of a political ideology. The author has compared the political debate in Norrbotten (Sweden) and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (Germany) from the mid-1990s up to the present, bringing out the norms, values and demands on which regionalism in these two regions rests. Drawing on extensive empirical material from the two regions, the author seeks to challenge any notion that modern-day forms of regionalism differ from previous ones in an absence of ethno-culturalist elements. The author adopts a critical approach towards treating regional identities, cultures and images primarily as desirable factors for regional economic growth.

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