Elmar Günther führt erstmals die Konzepte der Resilience, Vulnerabilität und Adaptive Capacity mit der aktuellen betriebswirtschaftlichen Forschung zusammen und liefert eine umfassende Bestandsaufnahme zu den Ursachen und Wirkungen des Klimawandels im sozioökonomischen und ökologischen System.
Many children's behavioral problems have multiple causes, and most children with one problem behavior also have others. The co-occurence and interrelatedness of risk factors and problem behavior is certainly an important area of research. This volume recognizes the complexity of the developmental processes that influence coping and resilience and the roles sociocultural factors play. The contributors focus on four themes that have emerged in the study of risk and coping over the past decade: interrelatedness of risk and problems, individual variability in resilience and susceptibility to stress, processes and mechanisms linking multiple stressors to multiple outcomes, and interventions and prevention. Psychologists, pediatricians, and others involved in the research or care of children will take great interest in this text.
Resilience is a set of qualities that enable children to adapt and transform, to overcome risk and adversity, and to develop social competence, problem-solving skills, autonomy and a sense of purpose. For children and young people it is as vital to possess these qualities in school environments as in the family and the community at large. This handbook for teachers and educators explores ways of nurturing resilience in vulnerable students. It proposes a new, positive way of thinking about schools as institutions that can foster cognitive and socio-emotional competence in all students. Individual chapters examine effective practices in schools and classrooms, and assess a range of classroom processes, such as engagement, inclusion, collaboration and prosocial behaviour. The author makes use of case studies throughout to bring to life classroom activities and concrete strategies that will promote best practice for enhancing student resilience, and offers a framework that can be adapted to the existing nature, culture and needs of each individual school community and its members. Promoting Resilience in the Classroom is a valuable resource for educational practitioners as well as educational officers and policy makers engaged in school development and educational improvement.
This book explores positive adaptation in at-risk children, providing suggestions for intervention and social policy.
This handbook gathers into one volume the current scientific theory, clinical guidelines, and real-world interventions that can help children overcome the everyday obstacles they face. It includes a wide range of perspectives addressing the role of resilience in helping children overcome these obstacles. The book provides guidance on how to measure and evaluate resilience in clinical practice, and it emphasizes the importance of resilience – positive psychology – rather than pathologies. In addition, the book features contributions from leading experts from a variety of fields, such as psychology, education, and social work.
Te nature of resilience and adaptation to change is brought to life in the critical experiences of people with disabilities.
What enables people to bounce back from stressful experiences? How do certain individuals maintain a sense of purpose and direction over the long term, even in the face of adversity? This is the first book to move beyond childhood and adolescence to explore resilience across the lifespan. Coverage ranges from genetic and physiological factors through personal, family, organizational, and community processes. Contributors examine how resilience contributes to health and well-being across the adult life cycle; why—and what happens when—resilience processes fail; ethnic and cultural dimensions of resilience; and ways to enhance adult resilience, including reviews of exemplary programs.
Researching Resilience challenges this tendency to pathologize youth, and marks a profound shift in research methods from the study of disorder to the study of well-being.
The many significant technological and medical advances of the 21st century cannot overcome the escalating risk posed to older adults by such stressors as pain, weakness, fatigue, depression, anxiety, memory and other cognitive deficits, hearing loss, visual impairment, isolation, marginalization, and physical and mental illness. In order to overcome these and other challenges, and to maintain as high a quality of life as possible, older adults and the professionals who treat them need to promote and develop the capacity for resilience, which is innate in all of us to some degree. The purpose of this book is to provide the current scientific theory, clinical guidelines, and real-world interventions with regard to resilience as a clinical tool. To that end, the book addresses such issues as concepts and operationalization of resilience; relevance of resilience to successful aging; impact of personality and genetics on resilience; relationship between resilience and motivation; relationship between resilience and survival; promoting resilience in long-term care; and the lifespan approach to resilience. By addressing ways in which the hypothetical and theoretical concepts of resilience can be applied in geriatric practice, Resilience in Aging provides inroads to the current knowledge and practice of resilience from the perspectives of physiology, psychology, culture, creativity, and economics. In addition, the book considers the impact of resilience on critical aspects of life for older adults such as policy issues (e.g., nursing home policies, Medicare guidelines), health and wellness, motivation, spirituality, and survival. Following these discussions, the book focuses on interventions that increase resilience. The intervention chapters include case studies and are intended to be useful at the clinical level. The book concludes with a discussion of future directions in optimizing resilience in the elderly and the importance of a lifespan approach to aging.
Adolescence is often portrayed as an age of particular risk. Adolescents are not only considered a risk to themselves, but also to the rest of society. As a society, we are nervous of them, and consider them vulnerable, yet the seeds of successful and independent adult life are laid down in adolescence, and they need all the help and support that they can get at a challenging time. Adolescents at Risk: Against the Odds looks in depth at some of the key risks faced by adolescents, and at some of the ways in which they can be alleviated. The book is structured according to the operational challenges the research informs.
An introduction to the emerging field of resilience research explains how to approach disruptions in ecosystems, businesses, and governments to better reinforce interdependent world systems.
Hope, What is it? How do we get it? Is it part of being human? Is it something that carries us through hard times? Is it something illusory? This book, which stems from the 4th Inter-Disciplinary.net conference on Hope: Probing the boundaries held in September 2008 at Mansfield College in Oxford, England, explores all of these questions and many more. As a truly inter-disciplinary venture, this book approaches the theme of hope from the point of view of the philosophical, theological, political, literary, psychological, and sociological and presents hope not just as an abstract theme to be pondered but as an aspect of human living and thinking that has a profound impact on our lives. The conclusions reached in each chapter demonstrate the variety of ways in which hope is conceived as well as the tensions inherent in any discussion of the benefits of hope and the intricacies in dealing with hope on a theoretical and a practical level. This book is perfect for anyone wondering where hope fits into our lives during these troubling times.
Since the beginnings of its development in Britain in 1987, the Looking After Children (LAC) initiative has had a profound influence in Canada-as well as in Australia and across Europe-in sharpening the developmental focus and improving the quality of services for children and adolescents who, because of abuse, neglect, extreme poverty, or other circumstances, live in out-of-home care. Promoting Resilience in Child Welfare presents reviews of research, new empirical findings, and useful practice and policy suggestions derived from the perspectives of LAC and resilience theory by an array of international voices. Practitioners, out-of-home care providers, youths in care, in-service trainers, students, researchers, and many others will find much in this book that speaks to more effective ways of improving the lives of young people being looked after in out-of-home care. (Midwest)
In this book, the authors offer a set of principles and practical applications to help educators make a difference in their students' lives.
The first volume in the Ashgate Studies in Resilience Engineering series deals with important issues such as measurements and models, the use of procedures to ensure safety, the relation between resilience and robustness, safety management, and the use of risk analysis. The chapters utilize a report from a serious medical accident to illustrate more concretely how resilience engineering can make a difference, both to the understanding of how accidents happen and to what an organization can do to become more resilient.
Despite the numerous benefits derived from major technological and medical innovations of the past century, we continue to live in a world rife with significant social problems and challenges. Children continue to be born into lives of poverty; others must confront daily their parent’s mental illness or substance abuse; still others live amid chronic family discord or child abuse. For some of these children, life’s difficulties become overwhelming. Their enduring trauma can lead to a downward spiral, until their behavioral and emotional problems become lifelong barriers to success and wellbeing. Almost no one today would deny that the world is sometimes an inhospitable, even dangerous, place for our youth. Yet most children—even those living in high-risk environments—appear to persevere. Some even flourish. And this begs the question: why, in the face of such great odds, do these children become survivors rather than casualties of their environments? For many decades, scholars have pursued answers to the mysteries of resilience. Now, having culled several decades of research findings, the editors of this volume offer an in-depth, leading-edge description and analysis of Resilience in Children, Families and Communities: Linking Context to Practice and Policy. The book is divided into three readily accessible sections that both define the scope and limits of resilience as well as provide hands-on programs that families, neighborhoods, and communities can implement. In addition, several chapters provide real-life intervention strategies and social policies that can be readily put into practice. The goal: to enable children to develop more effective problem-solving skills, to help each child to improve his or her self-image, and to define ways in which role models can affect positive outcomes throughout each child’s lifetime. For researchers, clinicians, and students, Resilience in Children, Families and Communities: Linking Context to Practice and Policy is an essential addition to their library. It provides practical information to inform greater success in the effort to encourage resilience in all children and to achieve positive youth development.
A recent report for the CIPD indicated that stress is now the more common cause of long-term sick leave in the UK for the first time ever. Demanding workloads and lack of job security are key stress factors, but in a tough, highly competitive environment these stressors are no longer avoidable. But you can learn how to cope with the stress effectively. Coaching for Resilience is your practical guide to the principles of positive psychology. Using tried and tested techniques it will show you how to motivate and inspire your clients and yourself to build greater resilience. There are clear explanations of the principles of positive psychology throughout, with practical exercises and examples for ease of understanding. This comprehensive resource will help you develop a clear understanding of the psychology of stress and develop your own strategies to enhance resilience.
Mental health specialists and researchers contend that the development of resilience in youth is facilitated at several levels. Relational, cultural, individual, and governmental factors all have a strong influence over the mental well being of young people. Resilience in Action looks at youth interventions with a view to fostering resilience in those living in adverse situations and conditions. In order to provide a practical approach to the issue, the essays in this volume explore the components of successful interventions, encouraging the transmission of effective practices from one community to another across borders. It is organized into four sections, each dealing with a different aspect of work with at-risk youth. The first section focuses on individual health and the ways in which intervention and therapy strengthen personal resources. The second section explores the dynamics of interventions in relation to specific contexts and localized relationships, emphasizing holistic approaches to youth work. A review of the cultural relevance of resilience follows in section three, and the fourth considers ways of increasing the accessibility to resources that encourage healthy development. Featuring contributors from a variety of academic and cultural backgrounds, Resilience in Action offers diverse answers to many of the persistent questions mental health professionals ask regarding how to enhance resilience.
The increased bombardment of information on the world's dangers, from imminent disasters to terror and wars reported in the media, make us particularly vulnerable to stress and feelings of helplessness. This volume is unique in describing how to promote resilience in different groups, under different circumstances, and dealing with different adversities. Resilience is the human capacity to deal with stress, adversities, and threats—and somehow emerge stronger. Today, the increased bombardment of information on the world's dangers, from imminent disasters to terror and wars reported in the media, make us particularly vulnerable to stress and feelings of helplessness. This volume is unique in describing how to promote resilience in different groups, under different circumstances, and dealing with different adversities. The contributors—psychologists, medical doctors, teachers and physical therapists among them—show how we can learn to draw on supports, build inner strength, and acquire interpersonal and problem-solving skills to deal with adversity. This volume will be useful for parents, service providers, researchers, policymakers, curriculum writers, and program developers. Research findings are applied to actions and policies so that the knowledge can be used in everyday life. Topics addressed include a basic understanding of resilience, resilience in families, the role of schools in resilience, and resilience for those needing health care. The text includes a discussion of the concern that too many children are protected from adversity, are unprepared to face future stressors, and become overly dependent upon others.

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