Many of the world's fisheries are in trouble - they no longer yield the catches, and potential profits, they once did. The habitats that support fisheries have been damaged by pollution and other irresponsible use of coastal land. Destructive fishing methods like trawling and blast fishing have also changed fish habitats resulting in support of fewer fish. The authors draw on more than 1000 scientific papers covering 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates. From this large literature, they distill 20 lessons for assessing and guiding the use of restocking and stock enhancement in the management of invertebrate fisheries. • Written by 7 expert authors • Covers 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates • Reviews over 1000 scientific papers • Identifies 20 lessons that can be learned from past restocking and stock enhancement initiatives • Proposes a new approach to assess the potential value of hatchery releases to complement other forms of management • Assesses progress of disciple against the blueprint for a responsible approach
Many of the world's fisheries are in trouble - they no longer yield the catches, and potential profits, they once did. The habitats that support fisheries have been damaged by pollution and other irresponsible use of coastal land. Destructive fishing methods like trawling and blast fishing have also changed fish habitats resulting in support of fewer fish. The authors draw on more than 1000 scientific papers covering 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates. From this large literature, they distill 20 lessons for assessing and guiding the use of restocking and stock enhancement in the management of invertebrate fisheries. • Written by 7 expert authors • Covers 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates • Reviews over 1000 scientific papers • Identifies 20 lessons that can be learned from past restocking and stock enhancement initiatives • Proposes a new approach to assess the potential value of hatchery releases to complement other forms of management • Assesses progress of disciple against the blueprint for a responsible approach
Advances in Marine Biology was first published in 1963. Now edited by David W. Sims (Marine Biological Association, UK), the serial publishes in-depth and up-to-date reviews on a wide range of topics which will appeal to postgraduates and researchers in marine biology, fisheries science, ecology, zoology, oceanography. Eclectic volumes in the series are supplemented by thematic volumes on such topics as The Biology of Calanoid Copepods and Restocking and Stock Enhancement of Marine Invertebrate Fisheries. * New information on the offspring size in marine invertebrates * Discusses important information on the social structure and strategies of delphinids * More than 250 pages of the latest discoveries in marine science
Mullets (grey mullets) are a family (Mugilidae) and order of ray-finned fish found in temperate and tropical waters worldwide. There are approximately 80 species of mullet; these fish have been considered an important food source in Mediterranean Europe since Roman times. This book provides a long overdue update on the biology and ecology of mullets and features comprehensive coverage of the key features of the Mugilidae family, such as recent DNA evidence and morphological data that challenge the traditional taxonomy.
U.S. mariculture production of bivalve molluscs-those cultivated in the marine environment-has roughly doubled over the last 25 years. Although mariculture operations may expand the production of seafood without additional exploitation of wild populations, they still depend upon and affect natural ecosystems and ecosystem services. Every additional animal has an incremental effect arising from food extraction and waste excretion. Increasing domestic seafood production in the United States in an environmentally and socially responsible way will likely require the use of policy tools, such as best management practices (BMPs) and performance standards. BMPs represent one approach to protecting against undesirable consequences of mariculture. An alternative approach to voluntary or mandatory BMPs is the establishment of performance standards for mariculture. Variability in environmental conditions makes it difficult to develop BMPs that are sufficiently flexible and adaptable to protect ecosystem integrity across a broad range of locations and conditions. An alternative that measures performance in sustaining key indicators of ecosystem state and function may be more effective. Because BMPs address mariculture methods rather than monitoring actual ecosystem responses, they do not guarantee that detrimental ecosystem impacts will be controlled or that unacceptable impact will be avoided. Ecosystem Concepts for Sustainable Bivalve Mariculture finds that while performance standards can be applied for some broad ecosystem indicators, BMPs may be more appropriate for addressing parameters that change from site to site, such as the species being cultured, different culture methods, and various environmental conditions. This book takes an in-depth look at the environmental, social, and economic issues to present recommendations for sustainable bivalve mariculture.
Many of the world's fisheries are in trouble - they no longer yield the catches, and potential profits, they once did. The habitats that support fisheries have been damaged by pollution and other irresponsible use of coastal land. Destructive fishing methods like trawling and blast fishing have also changed fish habitats resulting in support of fewer fish. The authors draw on more than 1000 scientific papers covering 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates. From this large literature, they distill 20 lessons for assessing and guiding the use of restocking and stock enhancement in the management of invertebrate fisheries. • Written by 7 expert authors • Covers 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates • Reviews over 1000 scientific papers • Identifies 20 lessons that can be learned from past restocking and stock enhancement initiatives • Proposes a new approach to assess the potential value of hatchery releases to complement other forms of management • Assesses progress of disciple against the blueprint for a responsible approach
With coastal fisheries in decline around the world, there is growing concern about how long current sources of seafood can supply world needs. There is an increasing emphasis on restocking and aquaculture-based stock enhancement as a way to rapidly replenish depleted fish stocks and increase fishery landings. This publication contains case studies on the use of sea ranching and marine hatchery enhancement to generate income, re-establish fisheries and conserve aquatic biodiversity, including studies from Norway, Australia, the Pacific Islands, the Caspian Sea with an emphasis on Iran, and Japan.
This expanded and fully updated Second Edition of the mostcomprehensive and successful book on lobsters, comprisescontributions from many of the world’s experts, eachproviding core information for all those working in lobsterbiology, fisheries research and management and lobsteraquaculture. Under the editorship of Bruce Phillips, the Second Edition ofLobsters: Biology, Management, Fisheries and Aquaculturedelivers exhaustive coverage of these fascinating creatures,stretching from growth and development to management andconservation. A number of chapters from the First Edition coveringGrowth, Reproduction, Diseases, Behaviour, Nutrition, Larval andPost-Larval Ecology and Juvenile and Adult Ecology have beenreplaced by new chapters including Lobsters in Ecosystems,Genetics, Translocation, Climate Change, Ecolabelling of Lobsters,Casitas and Other Artificial Shelters, Systems to maximise EconomicBenefits.. These new chapters reflect changes that are occurring inlobster management and new research developments brought on bysocial, climatic and economic changes. As well as information from new research output, information ineach chapter is also included on individual commercial Genera,including aspects of Species and distribution, Predators anddiseases, Ecology and behaviour, Aquaculture and enhancement,Harvest of wild populations and their regulations, Management andconservation. The chapter on slipper lobsters has also beenexpanded to include Thenus and Ibacus species whichare now subject to commercial fisheries. The changes that haveoccurred in some lobster fisheries, the new management arrangementsin place, the status of stocks and the current economic and socialsituation of each fishery have also been covered and discussed ingreat detail. Fisheries scientists, fisheries managers aquaculture personnel,aquatic and invertebrate biologists, physiologists, ecologists,marine biologists and environmental biologists will all findLobsters Second Edition to be a vital source of reference.Libraries in all universities and research establishments wherebiological and life sciences and fisheries and aquaculture arestudied and taught will find it an extremely valuable addition totheir shelves.
A broad review is provided of factors relevant to enhancing populations of invertebrate resources and methods promoting their recovery by natural recruitment, restocking or habitat restoration. The review focuses on the biological, technical, environmental, economic and biological factors affecting the feasibility of restoring or enhancing productivity of commercially valuable local invertebrate populations. Three categories of enhancement activity are recognized: restoring or enhancing stocks by conventional management methods, transplanting or seeding, and the use of juveniles produced from collectors in the wild or from hatcheries. Some guidelines are provided on issues related to enhancing recruitment, site selection, experimental closures, ecosystem considerations including predator control, as part of a stock management and enhancement programme. Ownership and co-management issues, and the necessary decisional rules for successful management are discussed, as well as how to reconcile the enhancement programme with other uses of the coastline. Spatial and geographical considerations are addressed, including allocation of areas for enhancement, rotational harvest schemes, use of refugia for protecting juveniles and the spawning stock, and the impact of the use of coastal zones for other human activities.
This book began life as a series of lectures given to second andthird year undergraduates at Oxford University. Theselectures were designed to give students insights as to how marineecosystems functioned, how they were being affected by natural andhuman interventions, and how we might be able to conserve them andmanage them sustainably for the good of people, both recreationallyand economically. This book presents 10 chapters, beginningwith principles of oceanography important to ecology, throughdiscussions of the magnitude of marine biodiversity and the factorsinfluencing it, the functioning of marine ecosystems at withintrophic levels such as primary production, competition anddispersal, to different trophic level interactions such asherbivory, predation and parasitism. The final three chapterslook at the more applied aspects of marine ecology, discussionfisheries, human impacts, and management and conservation. Other textbooks covering similar topics tend to treat the topicsfrom the point of view of separate ecosystems, with chapters onreefs, rocks and deep sea. This book however is topic drivenas described above, and each chapter makes full use of examplesfrom all appropriate marine ecosystems. The book is illustratedthroughout with many full colour diagrams and high qualityphotographs. The book is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students atcolleges and universities, and it is hoped that the many examplesfrom all over the world will provide global relevance andinterest. Both authors have long experience of research and teaching inmarine ecology. Martin Speight’s first degree was inmarine zoology at UCNW Bangor, and he has taught marine ecology andconservation at Oxford for 25 years. His research studentsstudy tropical marine ecology from the Caribbean through EastAfrica to the Far East. Peter Henderson is a Senior ResearchAssociate at the University of Oxford, and is Director of PiscesConservation in the UK. He has worked on marine andfreshwater fisheries, as well as ecological and economic impactsand exploitation of the sea in North and South America as well asEurope.

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