This follow up to Violent London deals in detail with the story behind the 2010 and 2011 riots both from the perspective of the protesters, rioters and from the point of view of the police and government. Bloom uses reportage, parliamentary, police and security briefings, as well as the voices and theory of modern protest, to tell the story.
The product of years of research, travel, and countless conversations, Burning Britain is the true story of the UK punk scene from 1980 to 1984 told for the first time by the bands and labels that created it. Covering the country region by region, author Ian Glasper profiles legendary bands like Vice Squad, Angelic Upstarts, Blitz, Anti-Nowhere League, Cockney Rejects, and the UK Subs as well as more obscure groups like Xtract, The Skroteez, and Soldier Dolls through hundreds of new interviews and photographs. As the 1970s closed the media was quick to declare punk dead, but a new generation of even more aggressive and political bands were announcing their presence through some of the most primal and potent music ever committed to plastic. This book is the definitive guide to that previously overlooked era.
No topic has been discussed at greater length or with more vigor than the racial confrontations of the 1960s. Events of these years left behind hundreds dead; thousands injured and arrested, property damage beyond toll, and a population both outraged and conscience stricken. Researchers have offered a variety of explanations for this largely urban violence. Although many Americans reacted as if the violence was a new phenomenon, it was not. Racial Violence in the United States places the events of the 1960s into historical perspective. The book includes accounts of racial violence from different periods in American history, showing these disturbing events in their historical context and providing suggestive analyses of their social, psychological, and political causes and implications.Grimshaw includes reports and studies of racial violence from the slave insurrections of the seventeenth century to urban disturbances of the 1960s. The result is more than a descriptive record. Its contents not only demonstrate the historical nature of the problem but also provide a review of major theoretical points of view. The volume defines patterns in past and present disturbances, isolates empirical generalizations, and samples the substantial body of literature that has attempted to explain this ultimate form ofsocial conflict. It includes selections on the characteristics of rioters, on the ecology of riots, and on the role of law in urban violence, as well as theoretical interpretations developed by psychologists, sociologists, political scientists, and other observers. The resulting volume will help interested readers better understand the violence that accompanied the attempts of black Americans to gain for themselves full equality.
While many studies of domestic collective violence, especially of the black riots of the 1960s, emphasize the causes of violence, James Button's is a major investigation of the consequences of violence. He not only analyzes how and to what extent the national government responded to the black urban riots, but he also moves toward a theoretical definition of the role of collective violence in a democratic society. In so doing, the author clarifies the utility or disutility of collective violence as a minority group strategy for effecting political change. Using a variety of sources and research techniques, Professor Button evaluates the effects of ghetto violence on public policy from a perspective that ranges from the earliest riots in 1963 to the later riots and their long-term impact through 1972. His use of rigorous empirical evidence to explore policy effects at the federal level fills the gap often left by more impressionistic research limited to case studies at a local level. The author's data indicate that many federal executive officials interpreted the acts of black urban violence in the 1960s as politically purposeful revolts intended to make demands upon those in power. James Button's work poses a serious challenge to those who argue that collective violence is apolitical, counterproductive, and pathological. Originally published in 1978. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Abstract:
Two scores and seven years ago, I set foot on American soil in order to pursue my Postgraduate medical training at New York University Medical Center—Bellevue Hospital, New York City, New York. Now, looking back upon the vast time-span of the five decades gone by, I can hardly believe that our national landscape has undergone a sea change. According to an old Oriental adage, “Even Mother Nature changes in a decade’s time,” thus the inevitable changes have turned at least five times over beyond recognition. America as we know it today is a drastically different country from what we observed back in the 60’s: many a thing that was acceptable back then is no longer even permissible, or downright illegal. Indeed, it goes without saying that the last half a century has been both tumultuous and cataclysmal in U.S. history. I have lived in Springfield, IL for 38 years since 1974 in a professional move from Honolulu, Hawaii and I became a U.S. citizen in 1976 when we celebrated the Bicentennial. I am still very grateful to my adopted country for what she has done for me and my family. My two children were born, raised and educated in this blessed nation. Nothing gives me more pleasure and happiness than to see them vigorously strive for their own professional careers. As we live in a diverse, pluralistic society, aptly called “melting pot” or “tossed salad,” I, myself, am always determined to be an active Player in the Great American Game of Life rather than being an idle or passive spectator. For nearly quarter a century, whatever social issues or subjects might come along to grab my attention, I haven’t hesitated to express my personal or professional opinion or viewpoint by writing to the Editor of newspapers, local and national, magazines, periodicals as well as professional journals. My letters and communications number altogether a little over 120. Now, I xxii call them collectively, “JUST MY TWO CENTS.” Most of them were published in the respective media, and my reader’s responses, whether favorable or critical, are also included. If indicated, some references are provided for further elucidation. I am well aware that my voice is feeble or hardly audible like a “voice in the wilderness.” Yet, I believe that I leave behind my footprints on the Prairie that I have traversed thus far. This book would not have come into existence without the loving and faithful support of my beloved wife, Young, who is always the source of my strength. My special thanks go to Aimie Trussell and Ms. Sara Barger who shared unselfishly their precious time with me in the preparation of the manuscript. I will always be grateful to them for their generous help. February 20, 2012 Chansoo Kim, M.D.
Trinkunas examines Venezuela's transition to democracy following military rule and its attempts to institutionalize civilian control of the military over the past sixty years, a period that included three regime changes. Placing Venezuela in comparative perspective with Argentina, Chile, and Spain, Trinkunas identifies the bureaucratic mechanisms democracies need in order to sustain civilian authority over the armed forces.
How diverse was the early Christian movement in Ephesus? What were its main characteristics? What held this movement together? Mikael Tellbe analyzes the process of identity formation of the early Christian movement in Ephesus towards the end of the first century and the beginning of the second century CE.
The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)
Originally published in 1985, One Chord Wonders was the first full-length study of the glory years of British punk. The book argues that one of punk’s most significant political achievements was to expose the operations of power in the British entertainment industries as they were thrown into confusion by the sound and the fury of musicians and fans. Through a detailed examination of the conditions under which punk emerged and then declined, Dave Laing develops a view of the music as both complex and contradictory. Special attention is paid to the relationship between punk and the music industry of the late 1970s, in particular the political economy of the independent record companies through which much of punk was distributed. Using examples from a wide range of bands, individual chapters use the techniques of semiology to consider the radical approach to naming in punk (from Johnny Rotten to Poly Styrene), the instrumental and vocal sound of the music, and its visual images. The concluding chapter critically examines various theoretical explanations of the punk phenomenon, including the class origins of its protagonists and the influential view that punk represented the latest in a line of British youth “subcultures.” There is also a chronology of the punk era, plus discographies and a bibliography.
Containing an impartial relation of all transactions, foreign and domestick: with a Chronological diary of all the remarkable occurrences, viz. births, marriages, deaths, removals, promotions, etc. that happened throughout the year: together with the characters and parentage of persons deceased on the eminent rank ...
before the Mayor's Court of Philadelphia, on the 13th of October, 1831, arising out of a Protestant procession on the 12th of July, and in which the contending parties were Protestants and Roman Catholics
Predicates and their Subjects is an in-depth study of the syntax-semantics interface focusing on the structure of the subject-predicate relation. Starting from where the author's 1983 dissertation left off, the book argues that there is syntactic constraint that clauses (small and tensed) are constructed out of a one-place unsaturated expression, the predicate, which must be applied to a syntactic argument, its subject. The author shows that this predication relation cannot be reduced to a thematic relation or a projection of argument structure, but must be a purely syntactic constraint. Chapters in the book show how the syntactic predication relation is semantically interpreted, and how the predication relation explains constraints on DP-raising and on the distribution of pleonastics in English. The second half of the book extends the theory of predication to cover copular constructions; it includes an account of the structure of small clauses in Hebrew, of the use of `be' in predicative and identity sentences in English, and concludes with a study of the meaning of the verb `be'.

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