Riot, Rebellion and Popular Politics in Early Modern England reassesses the relationship between politics, social change and popular culture in the period c. 1520-1730. It argues that early modern politics needs to be understood in broad terms, to include not only states and elites, but also disputes over the control of resources and the distribution of power. Andy Wood assesses the history of riot and rebellion in the early modern period, concentrating upon: popular involvement in religious change and political conflict, especially the Reformation and the English Revolution; relations between ruler and ruled; seditious speech; popular politics and the early modern state; custom, the law and popular politics; the impact of literacy and print; and the role of ritual, gender and local identity in popular politics.
The short reign of Edward VI was a turbulent one, even by Tudor standards. The kingdom was threatened by widespread unrest, riots, and rebellions among the common people. In this study, Beer looks at these dramatic events from the viewpoint of the rebellious commoners. Above the clamor of the streets and countryside runs the intricate story of the interaction and often confusing relations among the commoners, the gentry, and the king's councillors in London.
Although in its infancy, the history of women in Wales and Scotland before and during the Reformation is now thriving. A longer tradition of historical studies has shed light on many areas of women's experience in England. Drawing on this historiography, Christine Peters examines the significance of contrasting social, economic and religious conditions in shaping the lives of women in Britain. Gender assumptions were broadly similar in England, Wales and Scotland, but female experience varied widely. Women in Early Modern Britain, 1450-1640 explores how this was influenced by various factors, including changes in clanship and inheritance, the employment of single women, the punishment of pregnant brides and scolds, the introduction of Protestantism, and the fusion of fairy beliefs with ideas of demonological witchcraft. Peters' text is the first comparative survey and analysis of the diversity of women's lives in Britain during the early modern period.
'Community' and 'justice' recur in anthropological, historical, and legal scholarship, yet as concepts they are notoriously slippery. Historians and lawyers look to anthropologists as 'community specialists', but anthropologists often avoid the concept through circumlocution: although much used (and abused) by historians, legal thinkers, and political philosophers, the term remains strikingly indeterminate and often morally overdetermined. 'Justice', meanwhile, is elusive, alternately invoked as the goal of contemporary political theorizing, and wrapped in obscure philosophical controversy. A conceptual knot emerges in much legal and political thought between law, justice, and community, but theories abound, without any agreement over concepts. The contributors to this volume use empirical case studies to unpick threads of this knot. Local codes from Anglo-Saxon England, north Africa, and medieval Armenia indicate disjunctions between community boundaries and the subjects of local rules and categories; processes of justice from early modern Europe to eastern Tibet suggest new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between law and justice; and practices of exile that recur throughout the world illustrate contingent formulations of community. In the first book in the series, Legalism: Anthropology and History, law was addressed through a focus on local legal categories as conceptual tools. Here this approach is extended to the ideas and ideals of justice and community. Rigorous cross-cultural comparison allows the contributors to avoid normative assumptions, while opening new avenues of inquiry for lawyers, anthropologists, and historians alike.
This book attempts both to take stock of directions in the field and to suggest alternative perspectives on some central aspects of the period.
A collection of new and previously-published essays on the culture of the English Renaissance state.
Gender and Power in Britain is an original and exciting history of Britain from the early modern period to the present focusing on the interaction of gender and power in political, social, cultural and economic life. Using a chronological framework, the book examines: * the roles, responsibilities and identities of men and women * how power relationships were established within various gender systems * how women and men reacted to the institutions, laws, customs, beliefs and practices that constituted their various worlds * class, racial and ethnic considerations * the role of empire in the development of British institutions and identities * the civil war * twentieth century suffrage * the world wars * industrialisation * Victorian morality.
The sheer scale of surviving early modern Welsh court archives attests to the importance of the institutions that produces them—and they have, since the early 1970s, become major sources for a wide range of early modernists, not just those who specialize in criminal procedure. This volume discusses the fundamental and fascinating paradox of the criminal records of the Denbeighshire courts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, demonstrating their potential to illuminate both order and disorder, law-keepers and law-breakers, and the respectable and the unruly—showcasing early modern authority as both powerful and precarious in light of the shared experiences and attitudes of its local communities.
These essays present an examination of the events and crises which generated fear in early-modern societies. They offer examples of fear, and popular responses to it. From the natural threats of fire, flood and plague to the theoretical traumas of death and the afterlife, this volume covers the panoply of personal and communal tragedies which tormented, tortured and terrified the early-modern world.
To elucidate political ideas in mid-Tudor England, this dissertation consults a wide range of sources, including printed books; printed pamphlets; unpublished writings; correspondence; and government documents, including court records, interrogation transcripts, policy memoranda, proclamations, and statutes.
In the first book to provide a feminist analysis of early modern madness, Carol Thomas Neely reveals the mobility and heterogeneity of discourses of "distraction," the most common term for the condition in late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. Distracted Subjects shows how changing ideas of madness that circulated through medical, dramatic, and political texts transformed and gendered subjectivities. Supernatural causation is denied, new diagnoses appear, and stage representations proliferate. Drama sometimes leads and sometimes follows other cultural discourses--or forges its own prophetic figures of distraction. The Spanish Tragedy first links madness to masculine tragic self-representation and Hamlet invents a language to dramatize feminine somatic illness. Innovative women's melancholy is theorized in medical and witchcraft treatises and then elaborated in the extended portrait of the Jailer's Daughter's distraction in The Two Noble Kinsmen. Lovesickness, newly diagnosed in women, demands novel cures, and allows expressions of transgressive sexual desire in treatises and in plays such as As You Like It. The ritual

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