Bestselling author Michael Shermer delves into the unknown, from heretical ideas about the boundaries of the universe to Star Trek's lessons about chance and time A scientist pretends to be a psychic for a day-and fools everyone. An athlete discovers that good-luck rituals and getting into "the zone" may, or may not, improve his performance. A historian decides to analyze the data to see who was truly responsible for the Bounty mutiny. A son explores the possiblities of alternative and experimental medicine for his cancer-ravaged mother. And a skeptic realizes that it is time to turn the skeptical lens onto science itself. In each of the fourteen essays in Science Friction, psychologist and science historian Michael Shermer explores the very personal barriers and biases that plague and propel science, especially when scientists push against the unknown. What do we know and what do we not know? How does science respond to controversy, attack, and uncertainty? When does theory become accepted fact? As always, Shermer delivers a thought-provoking, fascinating, and entertaining view of life in the scientific age.
Meet Vaxy the pine marten. He's a graduate student at sunny Hoffridge U., where he helps Dr. Forrest with teaching, lab work, and getting his pants off whenever things are slow. Meet Mike the rabbit. He's Vaxy's roommate and not-boyfriend, and he certainly wouldn't have any reason to be jealous of Vaxy sleeping with someone else. If he found out. Meet Grace the fennec. He's a student, a friend of Vaxy and Mike who holds the firm belief that sex is just sex and shouldn't be mistaken for a relationship. Yes, it's just another semester at "Hot Fudge U.," where the sex is as hot and easy as a day at the beach. Vaxy and his friends have most of another year to go before they have to worry about that "real world" thing they've heard about. Now meet Mrs. Forrest. She's Dr. Forrest's wife. Written by Kyell Gold Cover art and interior illustrations by Cirrus
When Cooper takes Kevin to a science fiction convention, one of the props starts spewing out mini-aliens, and Kevin, Ben, and Gwen must stop the tiny pests and save the convention goers.
Rookie Read-About Science series.
Flabbergast: Science Friction is the Moonbeam Award winning graphic novel that follows the adventures of a Kung-Fu Science Adventure Team as they battle zombies and robots, travel to another dimension for training, and save the land from the threat of evil. Fans of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Fantastic Four, Avatar: the Last Airbender, and Naruto have a hard time putting this thrill filled book down.
The study of sliding friction is one of the oldest problems in physics, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Low-friction surfaces are in increasingly high demand for high-tech components such as computer storage systems, miniature motors, and aerospace devices. It has been estimated that about 5% of the gross national product in the developed countries is "wasted" on friction and the related wear. In spite of this, remarkable little is understood about the fundamental, microscopic processes responsible for friction and wear. The topic of interfacial sliding has experienced a major burst of in terest and activity since 1987, much of which has developed quite independently and spontaneously. This volume contains contributions from leading scientists on fundamental aspects of sliding friction. Some problems considered are: What is the origin of stick-and-slip motion? What is the origin of the rapid processes taking place within a lub at low sliding velocities? On a metallic surface, is the rication layer electronic or phononic friction the dominating energy dissipation pro cess? What is the role (if any) of self-organized criticality in sliding friction? How thick is the water layer during sliding on ice and snow? These and other questions raised in this book are of course only part ly answered: the topic of sliding friction is still in an early state of development.
Friction-vibration interactions are common but important phenomena in science and engineering. Handbook of Friction-Vibration Interactions introduces the principles and provides the resources to understand and work with them. A unified theoretical framework includes some of the most important engineering applications. The first three chapters in the book introduce basic concepts and analytical methods of friction and vibration. The fourth chapter presents the general principles on friction-vibration interactions, and also touches on various engineering applications. In the fifth chapter the concepts and methods are extended to some of the most critical engineering applications in high-tech industry, presenting the friction-vibration interaction principle and applications in data storage systems. Covers a key topic in science and engineering, with applications in daily life Introduces the principles of friction-vibration interactions Analyzes, presents experiments, and treats real systems ranging from nano to micro to macro scales
Friction Dynamics: Principles and Applications introduces readers to the basic principles of friction dynamics, which are presented in a unified theoretical framework focusing on some of the most important engineering applications. The book's chapters introduce basic concepts and analytical methods of friction dynamics, followed by sections that explore the fundamental principles of frictions. Concluding chapters focus on engineering applications in brake dynamics, the friction dynamics of rods used in oil suck pump systems, and the friction impact dynamics of rotors. This book provides comprehensive topics and up-to-date results, also presenting a thorough account of important advancements in friction dynamics which offer insights into varied dynamic phenomena, helping readers effectively design and fabricate stable and durable friction systems and components for various engineering and scientific friction dynamical systems. Investigates the most critical engineering and scientific applications Provides the most comprehensive reference of its kind Offers a systematic treatment and a unified framework Explores cutting-edge methodologies to address non-stationary, non-linear dynamics and control
Explains the science behind snowboarding, discussing equipment, types of terrain, top athletes, and how gravity and friction have an effect on different tricks and stunts.
Explores the force of friction through ten simple experiments using everyday objects.
"Should have broad appeal in many kinds of industry, ranging from automotive to computers—basically any organization concerned with products having moving parts!" —David A. Rigney, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA In-Depth Coverage of Frictional Concepts Friction affects so many aspects of daily life that most take it for granted. Arguably, mankind’s attempt to control friction dates back to the invention of the wheel. Friction Science and Technology: From Concepts to Applications, Second Edition presents a broad, multidisciplinary overview of the constantly moving field of friction, spanning the history of friction studies to the evolution of measurement instruments. It reviews the gamut of friction test methods, ranging from simple inclined plans to sophisticated laboratory tribometers. The book starts with introductory concepts about friction and progressively delves into the more subtle fundamentals of surface contact, use of various lubricants, and specific applications such as brakes, piston rings, and machine components. Includes American Society of Testing and Management (ASTM) Standards This volume covers multiple facets of friction, with numerous interesting and unusual examples of friction-related technologies not found in other tribology books. These include: Friction in winter sports Friction of touch and human skin Friction of footware and biomaterials Friction drilling of metals Friction of tires and road surfaces Describing the tools of the trade for friction research, this edition enables engineers to purchase or build their own devices. It also discusses frictional behavior of a wide range of materials, coatings, and surface treatments, both traditional and advanced, such as thermally oxidized titanium alloys, nanocomposites, ultra-low friction films, laser-dimpled ceramics, and carbon composites. Even after centuries of study, friction continues to conceal its subtle origins, especially in practical engineering situations in which surfaces are exposed to complex and changing environments. Authored by a field specialist with more than 30 years of experience, this one-stop resource discusses all aspects of friction, from its humble beginnings to its broad application for modern engineers.
Metal Transfer and Build-up in Friction and Cutting aims to systematize our knowledge of the metal build-up, to describe some of the investigations past and present carried out in SFTI (Tomsk), and to make an effort to explain a number of the phenomena in cutting, scratching, and sliding from the point of view of metal transfer theory. The book opens with a chapter on the temperature of the rubbing interface of two solids. This temperature is needed in order to elucidate the nature of the formation of a build-up in scratching, cutting, and sliding. Separate chapters follow on the seizure phenomena, the role played by a built-up edge in scratching, the built-up edge in metal cutting, metal transfer in friction; the occurrence and nature of the build-up at various speeds, temperatures, and pressures; and the problem of friction between cast iron and steel.
A thumb print left at the scene of a grisly murder. Fingerprints taken from a getaway car used in a bank robbery. A palm print recovered from the shattered glass door of a burglarized home. Indeed, where crimes are committed, careless perpetrators will invariably leave behind the critical pieces of evidence—most likely in the form of fingerprints—needed to catch and convict them. But the science of fingerprint identification isn’t always as cut and dry as detective novels and movies make it out to be. Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis, a new book in the ongoing Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations series, examines the latest methods and techniques in the science of friction ridge identification, or ridgeology. David R. Ashbaugh examines every facet of the discipline, from the history of friction ridge identification and its earliest pioneers and researchers, to the scientific basis and the various steps of the identification process. The structure and growth of friction skin and how it can leave latent or visible prints are examined, as well as advanced identification methods in ridgeology, including Poroscopy, Edgeoscopy, Pressure Distortion and Complex or Problem Print Analysis. The book, which features several detailed illustrations and photographs, also includes a new method for Palmar Flexion Crease Identification (palm lines) designed by the author and which has helped solve several criminal cases where fingerprints were not available. For crime scene technicians, forensic identification specialists, or anyone else pursuing a career in forensic science, this book is arguably the definitive source in the science of friction ridge identification.
In the past few decades, friction material engineering has become more sophisticated with many tests and techniques to investigate the properties of the materials and their counterparts before, during and after friction occurred. There has not been too much information available on the different raw materials used for friction materials. This book is more focused towards the raw materials that formulate the different friction materials. It explains about their main friction effects and material structure. Handbook of Friction Materials and Their Applications begins by explaining about different friction materials and how they can be used for brakes. It then goes onto explain the tribology of friction materials. Further out it discusses how different friction materials are formulated and produced. Noise and vibration are explained in a further chapter. The later part talks about how different raw materials can be used for friction materials, such as metals, carbon, organic and inorganic materials. Explains how different friction materials can be used for brakes Discusses the noise and vibration effects in friction materials Covers the raw materials that are used in friction materials
Fundamentals of Friction, unlike many books on tribology, is devoted to one specific topic: friction. After introductory chapters on scientific and engineering perspectives, the next section contains the necessary background within the areas of contact mechanics, surfaces and adhesion. Then on to fracture, deformation and interface shear, from the macroscopic behavior of materials in frictional contact to microscopic models of uniform and granular interfaces. Lubrication by solids, liquids and gases is presented next, from classical flow properties to the reorganization of monolayers of molecules under normal and shear stresses. A section on new approaches at the nano- and atomic scales covers the physics and chemistry of interfaces, an array of visually exciting simulations, using molecular dynamics, of solids and liquids in sliding contact, and related AFM/STM studies. Following a section on machines and measurements, the final chapter discusses future issues in friction.
It is my ambition in writing this book to bring tribology to the study of control of machines with friction. Tribology, from the greek for study of rubbing, is the discipline that concerns itself with friction, wear and lubrication. Tribology spans a great range of disciplines, from surface physics to lubrication chemistry and engineering, and comprises investigators in diverse specialities. The English language tribology literature now grows at a rate of some 700 articles per year. But for all of this activity, in the three years that I have been concerned with the control of machines with friction, I have but once met a fellow controls engineer who was aware that the field existed, this including many who were concerned with friction. In this vein I must confess that, before undertaking these investigations, I too was unaware that an active discipline of friction existed. The experience stands out as a mark of the specialization of our time. Within tribology, experimental and theoretical understanding of friction in lubricated machines is well developed. The controls engineer's interest is in dynamics, which is not the central interest of the tribologist. The tribologist is more often concerned with wear, with respect to which there has been enormous progress - witness the many mechanisms which we buy today that are lubricated once only, and that at the factory. Though a secondary interest, frictional dynamics are note forgotten by tribology.
A baseball player slides on the ground to tag a base. A toy car's wheels rub against the floor and slow the toy car down. Friction is at work all around you. But what exactly is friction? And how does it affect different objects? Read this book to find out! Learn all about matter, energy, and forces in the Exploring Physical Science series—part of the Lightning Bolt BooksTM collection. With high-energy designs, exciting photos, and fun text, Lightning Bolt BooksTM bring nonfiction topics to life!
The ability to produce durable low-friction surfaces and lubricant fluids has become an important factor in the miniaturization of moving components in many technological devices, e.g., magnetic storage, recording systems, miniature motors and many aerospace components. This book will be useful to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and engineers who need to understand sliding friction. This second edition covers several new topics including friction on superconductors, simulations of the layering transition, nanoindentation, wear in combustion engines, rolling and sliding of carbon nanotubes, and the friction dynamics of granular materials.

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