Why is snot green? Do rabbits fart? What is space made of? Where does all the water go at low tide? Can animals talk? What are scabs for? Will computers ever be cleverer than people? Discover the answers to these and an awful lot of other brilliant questions frequently asked at the Science Museum in this wonderfully funny and informative book. Divided into five sections, which cover everything from the Big Bang to bodily functions and cool gadgets: Lost in Space The Angry Planet Animal Answers Being Human Fantastic Futures Packed with doodles and information about all sorts of incredible things, and published in association with the Science Museum, this book contains absolutely no boring bits!
How will climate change affect our future world? Will forests turn to deserts? Will whole cities sink beneath the waves? Will we swim to school, and take speedboats to work? Will coal, oil, and cow farts destroy the planet?! Err...no. Probably not. But the world will change, and our future lives will change along with it. Are you ready for the future? In this amazing book, Glenn Murphy, author of WHY IS SNOT GREEN?, takes you on a time-travelling trip to the year 2050, to answer all your questions about the future of planet Earth. Join future-school student Jake as he explores a world of floating trains and liquid traffic . . . of underwater windmills and volcanic electricity . . . of vertical farms, rooftop cycle-tubes, solar-powered smart-houses and grass-powered buses! Packed with incredible information about the future of food, water, transport, energy and the environment, this book has all the good stuff and none of the boring bits! How will climate change affect our future world? Will forests turn to deserts? Will whole cities sink beneath the waves? Will we swim to school, and take speedboats to work? Will coal, oil, and cow farts destroy the planet?! Err...no. Probably not. But the world will change, and our future lives will change along with it. Are you ready for the future? In this amazing book, Glenn Murphy, author of WHY IS SNOT GREEN?, takes you on a time-travelling trip to the year 2050, to answer all your questions about the future of planet Earth. Join future-school student Jake as he explores a world of floating trains and liquid traffic . . . of underwater windmills and volcanic electricity . . . of vertical farms, rooftop cycle-tubes, solar-powered smart-houses and grass-powered buses! Packed with incredible information about the future of food, water, transport, energy and the environment, this book has all the good stuff and none of the boring bits!
Tracing material and metaphoric waste through the Western canon, ranging from Beowulf to Samuel Beckett, Susan Signe Morrison disrupts traditional perceptions of waste to better understand how we theorize, manage, and are implicated in what is discarded and seen as garbage. Engaging a wide range of disciplines, Morrison addresses how the materiality of waste has been sedimented into a variety of toxic metaphors. If scholars can read waste as possessing dynamic agency, how might that change the ethics of refuse-ing and ostracizing wasted humans? A major contribution to the growing field of Waste Studies, this comparative and theoretically innovative book confronts the reader with the ethical urgency present in waste literature itself.
The whooping crane rustlers are girls. Young girls. Cowgirls, as a matter of fact, all “bursting with dimples and hormones”—and the FBI has never seen anything quite like them. Yet their rebellion at the Rubber Rose Ranch is almost overshadowed by the arrival of the legendary Sissy Hankshaw, a white-trash goddess literally born to hitchhike, and the freest female of them all. Freedom, its prizes and its prices, is a major theme of Tom Robbins’s classic tale of eccentric adventure. As his robust characters attempt to turn the tables on fate, the reader is drawn along on a tragicomic joyride across the badlands of sexuality, wild rivers of language, and the frontiers of the mind. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Presents useful information and facts on some of the most common fears, from poisonous spiders and shark bites in the ocean to the probability of being struck by lightning or killed by a flesh-eating bacteria.
Forty years ago, Buzz Aldrin became the second human - minutes after Neil Armstrong - to set foot on a celestial body other than the Earth. The event remains one of mankind's greatest achievements and was witnessed by the largest worldwide television audience in history. In the years since, millions more have had their earth-centric perspective changed forever by gazing at the iconic photograph of Aldrin standing on the surface of the Moon with the blackness of space behind him. He described what he saw as 'magnificent desolation'. The flight of Apollo 11 made Aldrin one of the most famous people on the planet, yet few people know the rest of the story. In Magnificent Desolation, Aldrin not only gives us a harrowing first-person account of the lunar landing that came within seconds of failure, as well as the ultimate insider's view of life as one of the superstars of America's space program, he also opens up with remarkable candor about his more personal trials - and eventual triumphs - back on Earth. From the glory of being part of the mission that fulfilled President Kennedy's challenge to reach the Moon before the decade was out, Aldrin returned home to an Air Force career stripped of purpose or direction, other than as a public relations tool that NASA put to relentless use in a seemingly nonstop world tour. The twin demons of depression and alcoholism emerged - the first of which Aldrin confronted early and publicly and the second of which he met with denial until it nearly killed him. As an adventure story, a searing memoir of self-destruction and self-renewal, and as a visionary rallying cry to once again set our course for Mars and beyond, Magnificent Desolation is the thoroughly human story of a genuine hero.
How loud can your average middle-grader burp? Parents, librarians, and innocent bystanders are about to find out. This follow-up to the equally alluring WHY IS SNOT GREEN? tackles more of life's burning questions, many submitted by real-life ten-year-olds Could we use animal poop to make electricity? What's the world's deadliest disease? Why is your mother turning green? Part silly, part serious, and a big part scatological, HOW LOUD CAN YOU BURP? is destined for greatness and grossness.
Congressman John McCain explains how he learned about life and honor from his grandfather and father, both four-star admirals in the U.S. Navy.
Why don’t hammer-throwers get dizzy? Could the world’s fastest swimmer catch a jet-ski? How far can a human being run or cycle before they drop? Which nutter invented the ski jump? Glenn Murphy, author of Why Is Snot Green?, answers these and other brilliant questions in this fascinating book about the science of sport. From running a marathon to beating your friends at basketball, from negotiating a snowboard slalom track to pulling a backflip on a BMX, find out everything you ever wanted to know about sports and games! Become a whizz in science AND trounce your friends at your school sports day. It’s like being in the Olympics with none of the boring bits!
What’s worse than finding a maggot in your apple? Which smells worse: a rotten egg or a rotten leg? What are sick and poo made of? Glenn Murphy, author of Why is Snot Green?, explains how being revolted (and sometimes being revolting) can be both brilliantly beneficial and stupendously silly in this fantastically informative book. Packed with illustrations, photographs, information and jokes about all sorts of disgusting things, from bugs, bacteria and sweaty armpits to exploding bodies and creepy-crawly creatures, this book contains absolutely no boring bits!
A social scientist, the founder of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies anchored at Columbia University, describes how the dynamics of humiliation--intentional and unwitting--are central to large- and small-scale conflicts around the globe and internationally.
A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction of 2011 title From a State Department insider, the first account of our blundering efforts to rebuild Iraq—a shocking and rollicking true-life tale of Americans abroad Charged with rebuilding Iraq, would you spend taxpayer money on a sports mural in Baghdad's most dangerous neighborhood to promote reconciliation through art? How about an isolated milk factory that cannot get its milk to market? Or a pastry class training women to open cafés on bombed-out streets without water or electricity? According to Peter Van Buren, we bought all these projects and more in the most expensive hearts-and-minds campaign since the Marshall Plan. We Meant Well is his eyewitness account of the civilian side of the surge—that surreal and bollixed attempt to defeat terrorism and win over Iraqis by reconstructing the world we had just destroyed. Leading a State Department Provincial Reconstruction Team on its quixotic mission, Van Buren details, with laser-like irony, his yearlong encounter with pointless projects, bureaucratic fumbling, overwhelmed soldiers, and oblivious administrators secluded in the world's largest embassy, who fail to realize that you can't rebuild a country without first picking up the trash. Darkly funny while deadly serious, We Meant Well is a tragicomic voyage of ineptitude and corruption that leaves its writer—and readers—appalled and disillusioned but wiser.
Writing, for Michael Snow, is as much a form of “art-making” as the broad range of visual art activities for which he is renowned, including the “Walking Woman” series and the film Wavelength. Conversely, many of the texts included in this anthology are as significant visually as they are at the level of content — they are meant to be looked at as well as read. Situated somewhere between a repository of contemporary thought by one of our leading Canadian artists and a history book as it brings to light some important moments in the cultural life of Canada since the 1950s, these texts tell their own story, marking the passage of time, ideas and attitudes. The works included here, ranging from essays and interviews and record album cover notes to filmscripts and speeches (which, in Snow’s hands, often fall into the category of performance art), are not only “built for browsing,” they offer insights into both the professional and the private Snow. Together, they expand the context of Snow’s work and show the evolution of a great Canadian artist, beginning with his early attempts at defining art, to his emergence and recognition on the international art scene. This book is one of four books that are part of the Michael Snow Project. Initiated by the Art Gallery of Ontario and The Power Plant Gallery, the project also includes four exhibitions of his visual art and music.
Before television, radio, and later the internet came to dominate the coverage of Australian politics, the Canberra Press Gallery existed in a world far removed from today's 24-hour news cycle, spin doctors and carefully scripted sound bites. This historical memoir of a career reporting from The Wedding Cake of Old Parliament House offers a rare insider's perspective on both how the gallery once operated and its place in the Australian body politic. Using some of the biggest political developments of the past fifty years as a backdrop, Inside the Canberra Press Gallery - Life in the Wedding Cake of Old Parliament House sheds light on the inner workings of an institution critical to the health of our parliamentary democracy. Rob Chalmers (1929-2011) entered the Federal Parliamentary Press Gallery in 1951 as a twenty-one-year-old reporter for the now-defunct Sydney Daily Mirror and would retire from political commentary 60 years later - an unprecedented career span in Australian political history. No parliamentary figure - politician, bureaucrat or journalist - can match Chalmers' experience, from his first Question Time on 7 March 1951 until, desperately ill, he reluctantly retired from editing the iconic newsletter Inside Canberra sixty years, four months and eighteen days later. As well as being considered a shrewd political analyst, Chalmers was a much-loved member of the gallery and a past president of the National Press Club. Rob Chalmers used to boast that he had outlasted 11 prime ministers; and a 12th, Julia Gillard described him as 'one of the greats' of Australian political journalism upon his passing. Rob Chalmers is survived by his wife Gloria and two children from a previous marriage, Susan and Rob jnr.
Technology: Sorted! What's inside a laptop? How can you stuff 1,000 CDs into an mp3 player? Who built the Internet? How smart is the world's smartest robot? How do smartphones and TV remote controls work? The answers to these and other brilliant questions about technology can be found in this funny and fascinating book. Packed to capacity with megabytes of marvellous information, this book explores everything from the first simple engines to the latest gadgets, computers and networks. Technology: Sorted! What's inside a laptop? How can you stuff 1,000 CDs into an mp3 player? Who built the Internet? How smart is the world's smartest robot? How do smartphones and TV remote controls work? The answers to these and other brilliant questions about technology can be found in this funny and fascinating book. Packed to capacity with megabytes of marvellous information, this book explores everything from the first simple engines to the latest gadgets, computers and networks.
Freakonomics lived on the New York Times bestseller list for an astonishing two years. Now authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with more iconoclastic insights and observations in SuperFreakonomics—the long awaited follow-up to their New York Times Notable blockbuster. Based on revolutionary research and original studies SuperFreakonomics promises to once again challenge our view of the way the world really works.
Never has the term mad scientist been more fascinatingly explored than in internationally recognized popular science author Clifford Pickover's richly researched wild ride through the bizarre lives of eccentric geniuses. A few highlights: "The Pigeon Man from Manhattan" Legendary inventor Nikola Tesla had abnormally long thumbs, a peculiar love of pigeons, and a horror of women's pearls. "The Worm Man from Devonshire" Forefather of modern electric-circuit design Oliver Heaviside furnished his home with granite blocks and sometimes consumed only milk for days (as did Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison). "The Rabbit-Eater from Lichfield" Renowned scholar Samuel Johnson had so many tics and quirks that some mistook him for an idiot. In fact, his behavior matches modern definitions of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette's syndrome. Pickover also addresses many provocative topics: the link between genius and madness, the role the brain plays in alien abduction and religious experiences, UFOs, cryonics -- even the whereabouts of Einstein's brain!
What happens in your head during a headache? What are toes for? Why are some farts eggier than others? Glenn Murphy, author of Why is Snot Green?, answers these and a lot of other brilliant questions in this funny and informative book. Packed with doodles and information about all sorts of incredible things, from scabs, cells and broken bones to brainpower, bacteria and deadly diseases, this book contains absolutely no boring bits!
Space: Sorted! It's a BIG universe out there, and there's loads of stuff we don't know about it yet. But what we do know is pretty cool! This book has loads of information on all sorts of brilliant things like black holes, planets, solar flares and red dwarfs, with no boring bits! Space: Sorted! It's a BIG universe out there, and there's loads of stuff we don't know about it yet. But what we do know is pretty cool! This book has loads of information on all sorts of brilliant things like black holes, planets, solar flares and red dwarfs, with no boring bits!

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