This text explores the relationship between philosophy, science and physical geography, addressing an imbalance between a philosophically enriched human geography and a perceived philosophically ignorant physical geography.
This book provides undergraduates with a step-by-step guide to successfully carrying out an independent research project or dissertation. The book addresses each stage of the project by answering the questions that a student is likely to ask as the work progresses from choosing the subject area and planning the data collection through to producing illustrations and writing the final report. Most undergraduates in geography and related disciplines are required to undertake individual projects as part of their degree course; this book is a source of constructive, practical advice. This new third edition continues the tradition of friendly, well-informed but informal support, and continues to focus on answering the specific questions that students typically ask at each stage of the project. The new edition brings the text completely up to date by taking into account changes within the discipline and changes in the ways that students work. New digital media, social networking, mobile technology, e-journals, anti-plagiarism software, ethics approval rules and risk assessments are among the issues that this new edition takes into account. The new edition also broadens the book’s appeal by extending its coverage of the wide range of different approaches to geographical research, with expanded coverage of qualitative research, Geographic Information Systems, and new approaches to research design in both physical and human geographies
The development of geography also forms an interesting chapter in the history of the University ofTartu and in that of Estonian science in general. On the one hand, geography is a natural science in the broader sense ofthe word, on the other hand it is a study of human activity. This status of geography makes it particularly sensitive to the cultural and political circumstances under which scholarship and science have developed in Estonia. The article by Professor of Human Geography Ott Kurs (born 1939) and historian of science (PhD in geography) Erki Tamrniksaar (born 1969) "In Political Draughts Between Science and the Humanities: Geography at the University ofTartu Between the th th 17 -20 Centuries" is devoted to this topic. Among other things, the article states that regular instruction in geography started at the University of Tartu in 1826, when the second chair of geography in Europe was established here. Although the present book does not contain any studies on philosophy at th Tartu University in the 19 century, I would still like to mention two names. th In the early 19 century, I. Kant's philosophy was dominant at Tartu Uni versity. One of Kant's pupils, Gottlob Benjamin Jasche (1762-1839), who had worked under him as a Privatdozent in Konigsberg, served as a professor here from 1802-1839. In the history of philosophy he is primarily known as the publisher of Kant's Logic.
Perspectives on Kant's teachings on geography and how they relate his understanding of the world.
Wie Geografie Geschichte macht Weltpolitik ist auch Geopolitik. Alle Regierungen, alle Staatschefs unterliegen den Zwängen der Geographie. Berge und Ebenen, Flüsse, Meere, Wüsten setzen ihrem Entscheidungsspielraum Grenzen. Um Geschichte und Politik zu verstehen, muss man selbstverständlich die Menschen, die Ideen, die Einstellungen kennen. Aber wenn man die Geographie nicht mit einbezieht, bekommt man kein vollständiges Bild. Zum Beispiel Russland: Von den Moskauer Großfürsten über Iwan den Schrecklichen, Peter den Großen und Stalin bis hin zu Wladimir Putin sah sich jeder russische Staatschef denselben geostrategischen Problemen ausgesetzt, egal ob im Zarismus, im Kommunismus oder im kapitalistischen Nepotismus. Die meisten Häfen frieren immer noch ein halbes Jahr zu. Nicht gut für die Marine. Die nordeuropäische Tiefebene von der Nordsee bis zum Ural ist immer noch flach. Jeder kann durchmarschieren. Russland, China, die USA, Europa, Afrika, Lateinamerika, der Nahe Osten, Indien und Pakistan, Japan und Korea, die Arktis und Grönland: In zehn Kapiteln zeigt Tim Marshall, wie die Geographie die Weltpolitik beeinflusst und beeinflusst hat.
Neue Antworten auf die großen Fragen des Lebens Die Nahtoderfahrung, von der Dr. Eben Alexander in seinem SPIEGEL-Bestseller Blick in die Ewigkeit berichtete, berührte Millionen von Menschen weltweit. Für den Neurochirurgen war sie der Anlass für eine weitaus umfassendere Erforschung dessen, was nach dem Tod geschieht: In seinem neuen Buch setzt er sein eigenes Nahtoderlebnis in Beziehung zu modernsten Wissenschaften, zu spirituellen und philosophischen Weisheitslehren sowie Aufsehen erregenden Erfahrungsberichten anderer Menschen. In Form von sieben fundamentalen Erkenntnissen über das Leben nach dem Tod lädt er zu einer spannenden Reise auf die »andere Seite« ein und führt vor Augen: Unser jetziges Leben ist nur ein kleines Kapitel in einer viel größeren Geschichte – der spirituellen Entwicklung des Universums. Und unsere unsterbliche Seele ist jederzeit Teil dieser Entwicklung ...
A revised and updated guide to reference material. It contains selective and evaluative entries to guide the enquirer to the best source of reference in each subject area, be it journal article, CD-ROM, on-line database, bibliography, encyclopaedia, monograph or directory. It features full critical annotations and reviewers' comments and comprehensive author-title and subject indexes. The contents include: philosophy and psychology; religion; social sciences, sociology, statistics, politics, economics, labour and employment; land and property, business organizations, finance and banking, and economic surveys; economic policies and controls, trade and commerce, business and management, and law; public administration, social services and welfare, education, customs and traditions; geography; biography; and history.
English summary: The only geographical description which has been preserved of the Hellenic and Roman world. Volume 4 (XIV-XVII: Text and translation): Asia Minor (continuation), Persia, India, Middle East, Egypt, North Africa. This volume completes the presentation of the greek text and of its translation. German description: Die auf zehn Bande angelegte Ausgabe enthalt einen aufgrund neuer Kollationierung der Haupthandschriften und unter Berucksichtigung der gesamten zu Strabon erschienenen Sekundarliteratur konstituierten Text mit kritischem und Testimonien-Apparat und deutscher Ubersetzung (Bande 1-4), einen Kommentar (Bande 5-8), eine Transkription der mittelalterlichen Strabon Epitome und Chrestomathie, die es erlaubt, jeweils mit einem Blick festzustellen, welche Teile des Strabontextes diese wichtigen Textzeugen enthalten (Band 9), und einen Registerband. Die Bande erscheinen jeweils im Abstand von etwa einem Jahr.
This text provides a broad and integrative introduction to the conduct and interpretation of scientific research in geography. It covers both conceptual and technical aspects, and is applicable to all topical areas in geographic research, including human and physical geography, and geographic information science. The text discusses all parts of the research process, including scientific philosophy; basic research concepts; generating research ideas; communicating research and using library resources; sampling and research design; quantitative and qualitative data collection; data analysis, display, and interpretation; reliability and validity; using geographic information techniques in research; and ethical conduct in research.
Key Methods in Geography is an introduction for undergraduates to the principal methodological issues involved in the collection, analysis and presentation of geographical information. It provides an accessible primer, which will be used by students as a reference throughout their degree, on all issues from research design to presentation. A unique feature of the book is that it provides definitions of terms from both human geography and physical geography. Organized into four parts: Getting Started in Geographical Research; Data Collection in Human Geography; Data Collection in Physical Geography; Analyzing and Representing Geographical Data. Each chapter is comprised of a short definition, a summary of the principal arguments, a substantive 5,000-word discussion, the use of real-life examples, and annotated notes for further reading. The teaching of research methods is integral in all geography courses. Key Methods in Geography identifies the key analytical and observational strategies with which all geography undergraduates should be conversant.
This book is intended as a philosophical introduction to geo-ontologies, in response to their increasing diffusion within the contemporary debate, where philosophy plays a fundamental, though still unexplored, role. Accordingly, the first part offers a short overview of the ontological background of geo-ontologies, which comprehends computer science, philosophy and geography. The second part is devoted to describe the ontology of geography, to define notions such as geographical entities and boundaries, and to trace some philosophical tools useful for spatial representation. The third part investigates the emerging of geo-ontologies from the spatial turn and is concerned with a taxonomy for geo-ontologies grounded on some fundamental geographical distinctions. Finally, the last part presents the emergence of Digital Humanities and the consequent proliferation of geographical projects focused on the ancient world, in particular Greek and Roman.
"This book clearly outlines key concepts that all geographers should readily be able to explain. It does so in a highly accessible way. It is likely to be a text that my students will return to throughout their degree." - Dr Karen Parkhill, Bangor University "The editors have done a fantastic job. This second edition is really accessible to the student and provides the key literature in the key geographical terms of scale, space, time, place and landscape." - Dr Elias Symeonakis, Manchester Metropolitan University "An excellent introductory text for accessible overviews of key concepts across human and physical geography." - Professor Patrick Devine-Wright, Exeter University Including ten new chapters on nature, globalization, development and risk, and a new section on practicing geography, this is a completely revised and updated edition of the best-selling, standard student resource. Key Concepts in Geography explains the key terms - space, time, place, scale, landscape - that define the language of geography. It is unique in the reference literature as it provides in one volume concepts from both human geography and physical geography. Four introductory chapters on different intellectual traditions in geography situate and introduce the entries on the key concepts. Each entry then comprises a short definition, a summary of the principal arguments, a substantive 5,000-word discussion, the use of real-life examples, and annotated notes for further reading. Written in an accessible way by established figures in the discipline, the definitions provide thorough explanations of all the core concepts that undergraduates of geography must understand to complete their degree.
The fifty entries in this Companion cover the main issues in the philosophies of historiography and history, including natural history and the practices of historians. Written by an international and multi-disciplinary group of experts A cutting-edge updated picture of current research in the field Part of the renowned Blackwell Companions series
Originally published in 1892, "the object of this Handbook is to supply readers and speakers with a lucid, but very brief account of such names as are used in allusions and references, whether by poets or prose writers; - to furnish those who consult it with the plot of popular dramas, the story of epic poems, and the outline of well-known tales. The number of dramatic plots sketched out is many hundreds. Another striking and interesting feature of the book is the revelation of the source from which dramatists and romancers have derived their stories, and the strange repetitions of historic incidents. It has been borne in mind throughout that it is not enough to state a fact. It must be stated attractively, and the character described must be drawn characteristically if the reader is to appreciate it, and feel an interest in what he reads." This work, an American reprint of The Reader's Handbook by E. Cobham Brewer, ..".while retaining all of the original material that can interest and aid the English-speaking student, gives also 'characters and sketches found in American novels, poetry and drama.'"
Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject Geography / Earth Science - Physical Geography, Geomorphology, Environmental Studies, grade: A, Lund University (The Department of Human Geography and the Human Ecology Division, Faculty of Social Sciences), course: SIMM23 – Theory of Science for the Social Sciences, language: English, abstract: In mainstream Western discourses, phenomena of environmental change such as climate change, loss of biodiversity or degradation of soils are often linguistically equated with value-laden terms such as 'environmental problems', or subsumed under titles such as 'environmental crisis'. Whereas these phenomena are widely researched and discussed in terms of their nature, their causes, their severity and potential solutions, the underlying assumption of this research and these discussions, namely the assumption that these phenomena are actually problematic and need to be averted, seems rarely to be considered. However, given the amount of research dedicated to phenomena of environmental change, it is crucial to investigate this assumption. This paper will discuss how different philosophy of science perspectives would deal with the question in how far phenomena of environmental change (such as climate change, loss of biodiversity, degradation of soils) are actually problematic. The perspectives that will be adopted are positivism, critical realism, social constructivism and feminism. The paper will be structured along the spectrum between realism and relativism on which positivism, critical realism and social constructivism can be located rather clearly. However, since “[t]here is no single feminist standpoint”, 'feminism' as such can not be unitarily placed on this spectrum. Therefore, the feminist perspective will not be discussed in a separate section like the other perspectives, but will be taken up wherever it can enrich another perspective in its approach to the question. To provide an understanding of feminism, feminism will be shortly outlined before getting into the discussion of the question.

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