Reprinted by popular demand! Maynard Murray was a medical doctor who researched the crucial importance of minerals especially trace elements to plants and animals. Beginning in 1938 and continuing through the 1950s, Dr. Murray used sea solids mineral salts remaining after water is evaporated from ocean water as fertilizer on a variety of vegetables, fruits and grains. His extensive experiments demonstrated repeatedly and conclusively that plants fertilized with sea solids and animals fed sea-solid-fertilized feeds grow stronger and more resistant to disease. Sea Energy Agriculture recounts Murrays experiments and presents his astounding conclusions. The work of this eco-ag pioneer was largely ignored during his lifetime, and his book became a lost classic out of print for over 25 years. Now this rare volume is available to a new generation of readers.
With the recent republication of Dr. Maynard Murray's Sea Energy Agriculture, readers rediscovered the forgotten legacy of an eco-ag pioneer. Murray's idea -- that ocean water contains a concentrated, perfect balance of trace minerals in bioavailable form -- seems almost as revolutionary today as when he introduced it 30 years ago. In this fascinating book, Charles Walters examines Murray's career and the amazing successes that growers have experienced with his methods, as well as further developments in this technology by creative experimenters. Using hard data obtained in the field, Walters demonstrates that sea-solids fertilizers produce stress-resistant plants and food with naturally extended shelf life and vastly increased nutrient levels. Both an amazing narrative and a practical guide for improving soil and crop health, Fertility from the Ocean Deep is a must-read for everyone interested in the cutting edge of agriculture.
What is the most important plant in the world? In terms of nutritive content, function within the ecosystem, and even medicinal properties, the answer to this question may very well be grass. In this wide-ranging survey of grass forages and pastureland, Charles Walters makes the case that grass is not just for cows and horses - that in fact it is the most nutritious food produced by nature, as well as the ultimate soil conditioner. You will learn from traditional graziers who draw on centuries of wisdom to create beautiful, lush, sustainable pastures, as well as cutting-edge innovators who are using such methods as biodynamics and sea-solids fertilization to create some of the healthiest grasslands in the world. Leading agronomists not only explain the importance of grasses in our environment, they also share practical knowledge such as when to look for peak levels of nutrition within the growing cycle and how to use grass to restore soil to optimum health. A must-read for anyone interested in sustainable, bio-correct agriculture, this information-packed volume is a comprehensive look at an essential family of plants.
How will chemists of the future balance competing concerns of environmental stewardship and innovative, cost-effective product development? For chemists to accept the idea that environmental quality and economic prosperity can be intertwined, the concept of the food-energy-water nexus must first be integrated into underlying thought processes. Food, Energy and Water: The Chemistry Connection provides today’s scientists with the background information necessary to fully understand the inextricable link between food, energy and water and how this conceptual framework should form the basis for all contemporary research and development in chemistry in particular, and the sciences in general. Presents a clear, quantitative explanation of the link between food, energy, and water Provides information not currently available in chemistry curricula or synthesized in existing resources Examines the challenges of the food-energy-water nexus from a chemistry perspective within a multi-disciplinary domain Includes the latest research on critical topics such as fracking, water use conflicts, and sustainability in food production cycles
Breakthrough research. A new paradigm for increased crop yields of nutrient dense food. An inexhaustible means of increasing soil fertility.
An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction. Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.
This user-friendly book introduces biochar to potential users in the professional sphere. It de-mystifies the scientific, engineering and managerial issues surrounding biochar for the benefit of audiences including policy makers, landowners and farmers, land use, agricultural and environmental managers and consultants, industry and lobby groups and NGOs. The book reviews state-of-the-art knowledge in an approachable way for the non-scientist, covering all aspects of biochar production, soil science, agriculture, environmental impacts, economics, law and regulation and climate change policy. Chapters provide ‘hands-on’ practical information, including how to evaluate biochar and understand what it is doing when added to the soil, how to combine biochar with other soil amendments (such as manure and composts) to achieve desired outcomes, and how to ensure safe and effective use. The authors also present research findings from the first coordinated European biochar field trial and summarize European field trial data. Explanatory boxes, infographics and concise summaries of key concepts are included throughout to make the subject more understandable and approachable.
"In this cutting-edge book the connection is made between the physical, chemical and biological aspects o f minerals and subatomic particles int he life process, and assignment is made of the specific mineral that governs each entry in the genetic code.."-- Back cover.
This book is open access under a CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO license. The book uses an economic lens to identify the main features of climate-smart agriculture (CSA), its likely impact, and the challenges associated with its implementation. Drawing upon theory and concepts from agricultural development, institutional, and resource economics, this book expands and formalizes the conceptual foundations of CSA. Focusing on the adaptation/resilience dimension of CSA, the text embraces a mixture of conceptual analyses, including theory, empirical and policy analysis, and case studies, to look at adaptation and resilience through three possible avenues: ex-ante reduction of vulnerability, increasing adaptive capacity, and ex-post risk coping. The book is divided into three sections. The first section provides conceptual framing, giving an overview of the CSA concept and grounding it in core economic principles. The second section is devoted to a set of case studies illustrating the economic basis of CSA in terms of reducing vulnerability, increasing adaptive capacity and ex-post risk coping. The final section addresses policy issues related to climate change. Providing information on this new and important field in an approachable way, this book helps make sense of CSA and fills intellectual and policy gaps by defining the concept and placing it within an economic decision-making framework. This book will be of interest to agricultural, environmental, and natural resource economists, development economists, and scholars of development studies, climate change, and agriculture. It will also appeal to policy-makers, development practitioners, and members of governmental and non-governmental organizations interested in agriculture, food security and climate change.
Charles Walters recognized the national and international implications of applied raw material economics as revealed in the analyses of the U.S. economy by Carl H. Wilken, Charles B. Ray, John Lee Coulter and J. Carson Adkerson. They demonstrated how all new wealth enters an economy as raw materials provided by Nature. By fairly monetizing these raw materials, an economy is diverse, balanced, and free of debt. Unforgiven is the definitive work on the subject, derived from Walters' research and in-depth interviews with Wilken, conducted shortly before his death in 1968. The crisis that this book addresses has become even more pronounced in the years since it first appeared - an increasing wealth gap, a crumbling internal economy, human and economic harm inflicted upon our trading partners, millions of family farmers driven from their land, and small, privately owned businesses becoming extinct, ultimately leaving millions of Americans either directly or indirectly dependent on government handouts for existence. Wilken feared the concentration of power "in a few strong hands" as the deadliest enemy of a free society and saw the demise of independent enterprise and the family farm as the final curtain for the most dramatic social experiment in history: the American Dream. In Unforgiven, Walters presents not only the causes and effects of our continuing rural and urban decay, but also a way to stop it - the construction of an economy operating in tune with the laws of physics.
An eye-opening account of where our water comes from and where it all goes. The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from the Colorado’s headwaters to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and RV parks, to the spot near the U.S.–Mexico border where the river runs dry. Water problems in the western United States can seem tantalizingly easy to solve: just turn off the fountains at the Bellagio, stop selling hay to China, ban golf, cut down the almond trees, and kill all the lawyers. But a closer look reveals a vast man-made ecosystem that is far more complex and more interesting than the headlines let on. The story Owen tells in Where the Water Goes is crucial to our future: how a patchwork of engineering marvels, byzantine legal agreements, aging infrastructure, and neighborly cooperation enables life to flourish in the desert —and the disastrous consequences we face when any part of this tenuous system fails.
Subtitled The Seaweed Story, this book by one of the great minds of eco-agriculture explains how we can produce our food by using seaweed and fish-based inputs rather than wasteful and unsustainable chemical fertilizers. Fryer and Simmons tell how growers can harness the sea's energy to extend growing seasons, increase yields, protect crops from insects and disease, and more. This classic work of eco-ag is available again in this new edition.
This book offers an up-to-date review of our current understanding of climate change in the North Sea and adjacent areas, as well as its impact on ecosystems and socio-economic sectors. It provides a detailed assessment of climate change based on published scientific work compiled by independent international experts from climate-related disciplines such as oceanography, atmospheric sciences, marine and terrestrial ecology, using a regional evaluation and review process similar to that of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It provides a comprehensive overview of all aspects of our changing climate, discussing a wide range of topics including past, current and future climate change, and climate-related changes in marine, terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. It also explores the impact of climate change on socio-economic sectors such as fisheries, agriculture, coastal zone management, coastal protection, urban climate, recreation/tourism, offshore activities/energy, and air pollution.
From Eryn Paige, author of How to Grow Glorious Wheatgrass at Home Tutorial - With Salty Sea Mineral Eco-Fertilization for Superior Mineral Rich Soil.What is sea salt fertilization? Is salt really bad for soil, and for us too? Is seawater and its salt destructive, or are they a tremendous secret ally that can grow more nutritious plants that lead to increased disease resistance and better health - for both plants and us? Well, join Eryn Paige on her journey to revealing the incomparable storehouse of nutrients in the salty ocean that can dramatically help our soil and thus humankind. Pivotal information that can dramatically help us all.... How much unnecessary unwellness, hormonal imbalance, disease, and suffering exist because our soil is mineral depleted and is bombarded with harmful chemicals that also permeate our environment? Eryn believes now is the time to awaken to the hidden powers in the phenomenal solution of vintage seawater and its sea salt....You will see several colorful and educational pictures, including pictures of her unhealthy and sickly looking wheatgrass, and then see how good sea salt from seawater solved so many growing challenges and produced batch after batch of vigorous, lush, and more succulent wheatgrass with an even sweeter flavor. There is so much to learn from Mother Nature. Are marine creatures immersed in clean seawater with 90 plus minerals in phenomenal health, especially as compared to land animals eating foods grown in mineral depleted soil? Does the animal kingdom love and actually need salt to survive? What astounding positive health changes can occur in mice when sea salt fertilized foods are eaten? Is all sea salt the same? What is the right kind of sea salt to use? What salt should you absolutely not use? Get the answers to those questions, plus so much more in this book.Read Sea Salt Fertilization - Healthier Soil and a Healthier You! and it is undeniable that you will never look at the powerful ocean the same. With the knowledge in this book, and henceforth implementing sea salt fertilization on a global scale, a much healthier world can await us all. What are we waiting for?Eryn is also author of How to Grow Glorious Wheatgrass at Home Tutorial - With Salty Sea Mineral Eco-Fertilization for Superior Mineral Rich Soil. She knew a standalone book on this sea salt fertilization subject was necessary to help spread the good news on this extremely significant topic.
A historic energy revolution is underway in the United States. Wind, sunlight, and other sustainable resources are now the fastest growing sources of energy in the U.S. and worldwide. American families are installing power plants on their roofs and entire communities are switching to 100 percent renewable energy. The urgent need to prevent climate change is causing people around the planet to question their reliance on carbon-intensive oil, coal, and natural gas. Author Bill Ritter, Jr., the 41st governor of Colorado and one of America's key thought leaders on this topic, discusses the forces behind the energy revolution, the new ways we must think about energy, and the future of fossil and renewable fuels. It is an essential read for any who want to understand one of history's biggest challenges to peace, prosperity, and security in the United States. Written in partnership with the Center for a New Energy Economy.
Florida's climate has been and continues to be one of its most important assets. It has enabled the growth of many major industries, including tourism and agriculture, which now rank at the top of Florida's diverse economic activities. Our state's climate enables its native ecosystems to flourish and attract citizens from around the world. The dependencies of Florida's society and ecosystems on climate are widely recognized and generally taken for granted. However, we now know that climate around the world is changing. Questions arise about whether or not Florida's climate is changing, how rapidly these changes might occur, and how Florida may adapt to anticipated changes and help mitigate the rates of change. This book provides a thorough review of the current state of research on Florida's climate, including physical climate benchmarks; climate prediction, projection, and attribution; and the impacts of climate and climate change on the people and natural resources of Florida. The editors have gathered more than 90 researchers at universities across the state and beyond to address important topics such as sea level rise, water resources, and how climate affects various sectors, including energy, agriculture, forestry, tourism, and insurance. This volume offers accessible, accurate information for students, policymakers, and the general public. About the Editors: Eric P. Chassignet is a professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science and director of the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies at Florida State University. James W. Jones is a distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida. Vasubandhu Misra is an associate professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science and the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies at Florida State University. Jayantha Obeysekera is the chief modeler at the South Florida Water Management District. About the Florida Climate Institute: The Florida Climate Institute (FCI) is a multi-disciplinary network of scientists working to achieve a better understanding of climate variability and change. The FCI has ten member universities - Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU); Florida Atlantic University (FAU); the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT); Florida International University (FIU); Florida State University (FSU); Nova Southeastern University (NSU); the University of Central Florida (UCF); the University of Florida (UF); the University of Miami (UM); and the University of South Florida (USF). doi:10.17125/fci2017
As an investigative journalist, Monbiot found a mission in his ecological boredom, that of learning what it might take to impose a greater state of harmony between himself and nature. He was not one to romanticize undisturbed, primal landscapes, but rather in his attempts to satisfy his cravings for a richer, more authentic life, he came stumbled into the world of restoration and rewilding. When these concepts were first introduced in 2011, very recently, they focused on releasing captive animals into the wild. Soon the definition expanded to describe the reintroduction of animal and plant species to habitats from which they had been excised. Some people began using it to mean the rehabilitation not just of particular species, but of entire ecosystems: a restoration of wilderness. Rewilding recognizes that nature consists not just of a collection of species but also of their ever-shifting relationships with each other and with the physical environment. Ecologists have shown how the dynamics within communities are affected by even the seemingly minor changes in species assemblages. Predators and large herbivores have transformed entire landscapes, from the nature of the soil to the flow of rivers, the chemistry of the oceans, and the composition of the atmosphere. The complexity of earth systems is seemingly boundless."
This volume addresses the impacts of the Aral Sea disaster; disappearance of what was the world's fourth largest inland body of water. It argues this was the result of deliberate policy decisions. This volume is essential reading for everyone concerned with averting environmental disaster and in creating livable, sustainable communities.
Assisting readers in experiencing this geological phenomena, the authors draw upon actual encounters with volcanoes, often through firsthand accounts of those who have witnessed eruptions and miraculously survived the terrifying aftermath. 46 line illustrations. 85 halftones.

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