Influential classic of naval history and tactics still used as text in war colleges. Read by Kaiser Wilhelm, both Roosevelts, other leaders. First paperback edition. 4 maps. 24 battle plans.
This is the first study to show how the Royal Navy's ideas about the meaning and application of seapower shaped its policies in the interwar period. It challenges the accepted view that the shortcomings of Britain's naval leaders resulted in poor strategic planning and an inability to meet the challenges of World War II.
From one of the most admired admirals of his generation -- and the only admiral to serve as Supreme Allied Commander at NATO -- comes a remarkable voyage through all of the world’s most important bodies of water, providing the story of naval power as a driver of human history and a crucial element in our current geopolitical path. From the time of the Greeks and the Persians clashing in the Mediterranean, sea power has determined world power. To an extent that is often underappreciated, it still does. No one understands this better than Admiral Jim Stavridis. In Sea Power, Admiral Stavridis takes us with him on a tour of the world’s oceans from the admiral’s chair, showing us how the geography of the oceans has shaped the destiny of nations, and how naval power has in a real sense made the world we live in today, and will shape the world we live in tomorrow. Not least, Sea Power is marvelous naval history, giving us fresh insight into great naval engagements from the battles of Salamis and Lepanto through to Trafalgar, the Battle of the Atlantic, and submarine conflicts of the Cold War. It is also a keen-eyed reckoning with the likely sites of our next major naval conflicts, particularly the Arctic Ocean, Eastern Mediterranean, and the South China Sea. Finally, Sea Power steps back to take a holistic view of the plagues to our oceans that are best seen that way, from piracy to pollution. When most of us look at a globe, we focus on the shape of the of the seven continents. Admiral Stavridis sees the shapes of the seven seas. After reading Sea Power, you will too. Not since Alfred Thayer Mahan’s legendary The Influence of Sea Power upon History have we had such a powerful reckoning with this vital subject.
Admiral Gorshkov has transformed the Soviet fleet into a world sea power for the first time in Russian history. He is Russia's most brilliant naval strategist of all time. He has created the modern Soviet navy. His book examines the main components of sea power among which attention is focused on the naval fleet of the present day, capable of conducting operations and solving strategic tasks in different regions of the world's oceans, together with other branches of the armed forces and independently
This is the third, revised and fully updated, edition of Geoffrey Till's Seapower: A Guide for the 21st Century. The rise of the Chinese and other Asian navies, worsening quarrels over maritime jurisdiction and the United States' maritime pivot towards the Asia-Pacific region reminds us that the sea has always been central to human development as a source of resources, and as a means of transportation, information-exchange and strategic dominion. It has provided the basis for mankind's prosperity and security, and this is even more true in the early 21st century, with the emergence of an increasingly globalized world trading system. Navies have always provided a way of policing, and sometimes exploiting, the system. In contemporary conditions, navies, and other forms of maritime power, are having to adapt, in order to exert the maximum power ashore in the company of others and to expand the range of their interests, activities and responsibilities. While these new tasks are developing fast, traditional ones still predominate. Deterrence remains the first duty of today's navies, backed up by the need to 'fight and win' if necessary. How navies and their states balance these two imperatives will tell us a great deal about our future in this increasingly maritime century. This book investigates the consequences of all this for the developing nature, composition and functions of all the world's significant navies, and provides a guide for anyone interested in the changing and crucial role of seapower in the 21st century. Seapower is essential reading for all students of naval power, maritime security and naval history, and highly recommended for students of strategic studies, international security and International Relations.
An important new history of air and sea power in World War II and its decisive role in Allied victory.
A navy is a state's main instrument of maritime force. What it should do, what doctrine it holds, what ships it deploys, and how it fights are determined by practical political and military choices in relation to national needs. Choices are made according to the state's goals, perceived threat, maritime opportunity, technological capabilities, practical experience, and, not the least, the way the sea service defines itself and its way of war. This book is a history of the modern U.S. Navy. It explains how the Navy, in the century after 1890, was formed and reformed in the interaction of purpose, experience, and doctrine.
The Navy in the Post-Cold War World is the first book to invite the reader to think strategically&—that is, in means-ends terms&—about the navy in the new post-Soviet era. It provides a unique synthesis of strategic theory, defense analysis, and history. Colin Gray first explains how sea power &"works&"; explores the strategic relationship among sea, land, and air power, with particular attention to the course of a conflict viewed as a whole; and ventures boldly into the region of the meaning of space strategy for maritime power and the relevance of that power in the still emerging post-Cold War security environment. The Navy in the Post-Cold War World is unusual because it is written by an internationally recognized general strategic theorist and analyst rather than by a long-standing naval writer. Gray is thus better able to view naval issues in proper perspective. Gray delves deeply into the role of sea power as an enabling agent and team player in the overall enterprise of national and international security. He provides the most current assessment of what sea and space power mean for each other as well as envisioning the future of maritime-oriented defense.
A thought-provoking analysis of how the acquisition and utilization of information has determined the course of history over the past five centuries and shaped the world as we know it todaydiv /DIV
Elizabeth A. Kaye specializes in communications as part of her coaching and consulting practice. She has edited Requirements for Certification since the 2000-01 edition.
Parry argues that in the second decade of the 21st century, the sea is set to reclaim its status as the world's preeminent strategic medium. Almost everything that travels virtually between continents and states on the Internet moves, in reality, across, under or over the sea. Parry makes the case that the next decade will witness a scramble for the sea, involving competition for oceanic resources and the attempted political and economic colonization of large tracts of what have, until now, been considered international waters and shipping routes. Can the UK, with its seafaring history, reclaim the waves?
Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Sergei Georgiyevich Gorshkov led the Soviet Navy for almost three decades during the height of the Cold War. He was the architect of the Red Fleet, turning it from little more than a coastal defense force into the most powerful navy that Russia ever possessed. It was a remarkable achievement and gave his country unprecedented influence far beyond its shores. Ahead of his time, he was a strategist who advocated a much broader view of sea power than just the naval element, drawing together the exploitation of natural resources, the conduct of mercantile business, the enabling of legal frameworks, societal needs, environmental protection, politics and maritime security into his unified vision. But, most importantly for today’s scholars, he was also a writer, capturing his thoughts in books and articles written throughout his period at the helm. Now, a century after the Russian Revolution and almost three decades after the collapse of the USSR, there is renewed interest in the history of the Cold War. The time is right for new, objective assessments of the confrontation that shaped so much of the last century, for in it there are lessons for our own. Western, predominantly Anglo-American concepts of sea power have so dominated theory and practise that they have become accepted in the West almost without question. Sergei Gorshkov showed that there is always an alternative perspective. 21st Century Gorshkov is a collection of writing by one of the twentieth century’s most revered naval figures. Articles, many of which have not previously been published in English, sit alongside notable passages from his more famous books, each with a short introduction linking the work to the challenges facing navies everywhere today. Planners from Washington, DC to Beijing, London to New Delhi have much to learn from the man behind the most rapid naval expansion program in peacetime history. Gorshkov’s ideas on teamwork, ethos, naval ‘art’ and ‘science’, power and prosperity remain as relevant today as the day they were written.
A fascinating naval perspective on one of the greatest of all historical conundrums: How did thirteen isolated colonies, which in 1775 began a war with Britain without a navy or an army, win their independence from the greatest naval and military power on earth? The American Revolution involved a naval war of immense scope and variety, including no fewer than twenty-two navies fighting on five oceans—to say nothing of rivers and lakes. In no other war were so many large-scale fleet battles fought, one of which was the most strategically significant naval battle in all of British, French, and American history. Simultaneous naval campaigns were fought in the English Channel, the North and Mid-Atlantic, the Mediterranean, off South Africa, in the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean, the Pacific, the North Sea and, of course, off the eastern seaboard of America. Not until the Second World War would any nation actively fight in so many different theaters. In The Struggle for Sea Power, Sam Willis traces every key military event in the path to American independence from a naval perspective, and he also brings this important viewpoint to bear on economic, political, and social developments that were fundamental to the success of the Revolution. In doing so Willis offers valuable new insights into American, British, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Russian history. This unique account of the American Revolution gives us a new understanding of the influence of sea power upon history, of the American path to independence, and of the rise and fall of the British Empire.
The technological advances in the machinery of space, nuclear and air warfare have obscured the importance of naval power. Using examples from Ancient Greece to the Gulf War, Gray argues that control of the sea is vital to strategic planning.
An exciting chronicle of important maritime wars and the nations that fought them defends the notion that mastery of the sea is a vital component to great-power status.
Shows how extensive the naval power of Islamic states was, charts the rise and fall of Islamic navies, and outlines the various wars and campaigns in which Islamic navies were involved.
This survey of American naval history features original chapters from key scholars in the field that trace the relationship between the American Navy and the position of the United States on the global political stage over the past 250 years. Places equal weight on the influence of major wartime campaigns and naval efforts to defend and expand America’s political and economic interests during times of peace Includes an array of illustrations and 56 new maps, seamlessly integrated within each chapter Each chapter features sidebars with biographical sketches of influential leaders and descriptions of weapons and technological developments of the era

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