Religious and Ethical Perspectives on Global Migration examines the complicated social ethics of migration in today's world. Editors Elizabeth W. Collier and Charles R. Strain bring the perspectives of an international group of scholars toward a theory of justice and ethical understanding for the nearly two hundred million migrants who have left their homes seeking asylum from political persecution, greater freedom and safety, economic opportunity, or reunion with family members.
Restorative Justice Volume 5, Number 2, June 2016 Edited by David M. McCarthy The Emergence of Restorative Justice in Ecclesial Practice Thomas Noakes-Duncan Restorative and Transformative Justice in a Land of Mass Incarceration Amy Levad Soteriology, Eucharist and the Madness of Forgiveness Christopher McMahon Breaking Out: The Expansiveness of Restorative Justice in Laudato Si' Eli McCarthy Catholic Theology of Post-Conflict Restorative Justice:The Doctrine of Hypostatic Union as a Viable Inspiration Rev. Raymond Aina, MSP Just War Theory and Restorative Justice: Weaving a Consistent Ethic of Reconciliation Anna Floerke Scheid Restorative Justice and the International Criminal Court John Kiess Restorative Justice in Baltimore Virginia McGovern and Layton Field A Theological Understanding of Restorative Justice Margaret R. Pfeil Symposium on the 2015 Synod of Bishops on the Family Kari-Shane Zimmerman, James T. Bretzke, S.J., Jana Bennett,Andrew Kim, and Christina Astorga
Mobile Childhoods in Filipino Transnational Families focuses on the lived experiences of '1.5-generation' migrants with similar 'roots' (the Philippines), traversing different 'routes' (receiving countries). By shedding light on the diversified paths of their migratory lives, it revisits the relationships between mobility, sociality and identity.
How does one capture the delightful irony of Edith Wharton's prose or the spare lyricism of Kate Chopin's? Kathleen Wheeler challenges the reader to experiment with a more imaginative method of literary criticism in order to comprehend more fully writers of the Modernist and late Realist period. In examining the creative works of seven women writers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Wheeler never lets the mystery and magic of literature be overcome by dry critical analysis. Modernist Women Writers and Narrative Art begins by evaluating how Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, and Willa Cather all engaged in an ironic critique of realism. They explored the inadequacies of this form in expressing human experience and revealed its hidden, often contradictory, assumptions. Building on the foundation that Wharton, Chopin, and Cather established, Jean Rhys, Katherine Mansfield, Stevie Smith, and Jane Bowles brought literature into the era we now consider modernism. Drawing on insights from feminist theory, deconstructionism and revisions of new historicism, Kathleen Wheeler reveals a literary tradition rich in narrative strategy and stylistic sophistication.

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