Religious and Ethical Perspectives on Global Migration examines the complicated social ethics of migration in today's world. Editors Elizabeth W. Collier and Charles R. Strain bring the perspectives of an international group of scholars toward a theory of justice and ethical understanding for the nearly two hundred million migrants who have left their homes seeking asylum from political persecution, greater freedom and safety, economic opportunity, or reunion with family members.
Restorative Justice Volume 5, Number 2, June 2016 Edited by David M. McCarthy The Emergence of Restorative Justice in Ecclesial Practice Thomas Noakes-Duncan Restorative and Transformative Justice in a Land of Mass Incarceration Amy Levad Soteriology, Eucharist and the Madness of Forgiveness Christopher McMahon Breaking Out: The Expansiveness of Restorative Justice in Laudato Si' Eli McCarthy Catholic Theology of Post-Conflict Restorative Justice:The Doctrine of Hypostatic Union as a Viable Inspiration Rev. Raymond Aina, MSP Just War Theory and Restorative Justice: Weaving a Consistent Ethic of Reconciliation Anna Floerke Scheid Restorative Justice and the International Criminal Court John Kiess Restorative Justice in Baltimore Virginia McGovern and Layton Field A Theological Understanding of Restorative Justice Margaret R. Pfeil Symposium on the 2015 Synod of Bishops on the Family Kari-Shane Zimmerman, James T. Bretzke, S.J., Jana Bennett,Andrew Kim, and Christina Astorga
Mobile Childhoods in Filipino Transnational Families focuses on the lived experiences of '1.5-generation' migrants with similar 'roots' (the Philippines), traversing different 'routes' (receiving countries). By shedding light on the diversified paths of their migratory lives, it revisits the relationships between mobility, sociality and identity.
In a globalized economy that is heavily sustained by the labor of immigrants, why are certain nations defined as "ideal" labor resources and why do certain groups dominate a particular labor force? The Philippines has emerged as a lucrative source of labor for countries around the world. In Marketing Dreams, Manufacturing Heroes Anna Romina Guevarra focuses on the Philippines—which views itself as the "home of the great Filipino worker"—and the multilevel brokering process that manages and sends workers worldwide. She unravels the transnational production of Filipinos as ideal migrant workers by the state and explores how race, color, class, and gender operate. The experience of Filipino nurses and domestic workers—two of the country's prized exports—is at the core of the research, which utilizes interviews with employees at labor brokering agencies, state officials from governmental organizations in the Philippines, and nurses working in the United States. Guevarra's multisited ethnography reveals the disciplinary power that state and employment agencies exercise over care workers—managing migration and garnering wages—to govern social conduct, and brings this isolated yet widespread social problem to life.

Best Books