More then those of any other living photographer, Sebastião Salgado's images of the world's poor stand in tribute to the human condition. Salgado defines his work as "militant photography" dedicated to "the best comprehension of man"; over the decades he has bestowed great dignity on the most isolated and neglected among us-- from famine-stricken refugees in the Sahel to the indigenous peoples of South America. With Workers, Salgado brings us a global epic that transcends mere image making to become an affirmation of the enduring spirit of working men and women. In this volume, three hundred fifty duotone photographs form an archaeological perspective of the activities that have defined hard work from the Stone Age through the Industrial Revolution to the present. With images of the infernal landscape of an Indonesian sulfur mine, the drama of traditional Sicilian tuna fishing, and the staggering endurance of Brazilian gold miners, Salgado unearths layers of visual information to reveal the ceaseless human activity at the core of modern civilization. Workers presents its subjects on several interactive levels: Salgado's introductory text expands his passionate photographic iconography, and extended captions, also written by Salgado, provide a historical and factual framework. Evoking the monumentality of Baroque sculpture, images of oil-fire fighters extinguishing Kuwaiti wells are informed by data detailing this perilous venture. Heroic photographs of Cuban and Brazilian peasants harvesting sugarcane are enriched by an overview of the history of the sugar trade, which documents centuries of colonialist exploitation. On the eve of the millennium, Workers serves as an elegy for the passing of traditional methods of labor and production. Yet its ultimate message is one of endurance and hope: entire Indian families serve as construction crews to build a dam that will bring life to their land, and laborers using contemporary technology connect England and France through Eurotunnel. Honoring the timeless and indomitable spirit of the manual laborer, Workers renders the human condition with honesty and respect.
In this remarkable visual survey, internationally acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado documents traditional methods of sustainable coffee farming across the globe, revealing rituals deeply steeped in history and pride. The book spans nearly a decade of research into the hidden world of coffee, highlighting relationships characterized by respect, fair exchange, and a shared understanding that ever-improving quality has the power to improve lives. Salgado, a native to one of Brazil s premier coffee-growing regions, is the perfect guide for a reader s journey to principal farming locations in China, Colombia, Guatemala, Ethiopia, India, Brazil, Costa Rica, and beyond."
First published in April 2000, Migrations and its companion volume, The Children, have been garnering tremendous international attention ever since. Exhibited across the globe, from Brazil to Paris and Germany to New York, Sebastião Salgado's photographs continue to tour and to transform the perceptions of those who view them. As a testament to both their power and their relevance, a major exhibition of photographs from The Children was mounted as part of the United Nations Millennium Assembly in 2000. In Migrations, internationally renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado turns his attention to the staggering phenomenon of mass migration. In photographs taken over seven years and across more than thirty-five countries, this volume documents the epic displacement of the world's people at the close of the twentieth century. Wars, natural disasters, environmental degradation, explosive population growth, and the widening gap between rich and poor have resulted in over one hundred million international migrants, a number that has doubled in the span of a decade. This extraordinary level of demographic change is unparalleled in human history, and presents profound challenges to the most basic notions of nation, culture, community, and citizenship. The first pictorial survey to extensively chronicle the current global flux of humanity, Migrations follows Latin Americans entering the United States, Jews leaving the former Soviet Union, Africans traveling into Europe, Kosovars fleeing into Albania, and many others. The images address suffering while revealing the profound dignity, courage, and energy of the subjects. With his unique vision and empathy, Salgado gives us a clearer picture of the enormous social and political transformations now occurring in a world divided between excess and need. First published in April 2000, Migrations and its companion volume, The Children, have been garnering tremendous international attention ever since. Exhibited across the globe, from Brazil to Paris and Germany to New York, Sebastião Salgado's photographs continue to tour and to transform the perceptions of those who view them. As a testament to both their power and their relevance, a major exhibition of photographs from The Children was mounted as part of the United Nations Millennium Assembly in 2000. In Migrations, internationally renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado turns his attention to the staggering phenomenon of mass migration. In photographs taken over seven years and across more than thirty-five countries, this volume documents the epic displacement of the world's people at the close of the twentieth century. Wars, natural disasters, environmental degradation, explosive population growth, and the widening gap between rich and poor have resulted in over one hundred million international migrants, a number that has doubled in the span of a decade. This extraordinary level of demographic change is unparalleled in human history, and presents profound challenges to the most basic notions of nation, culture, community, and citizenship. The first pictorial survey to extensively chronicle the current global flux of humanity, Migrations follows Latin Americans entering the United States, Jews leaving the former Soviet Union, Africans traveling into Europe, Kosovars fleeing into Albania, and many others. The images address suffering while revealing the profound dignity, courage, and energy of the subjects. With his unique vision and empathy, Salgado gives us a clearer picture of the enormous social and political transformations now occurring in a world divided between excess and need.
Sebastião Salgados photographs have been shown around the world. In From my land to the Planet the photographer tells us the story of his most famous reportages: from the black and white portraits of unknown men and women, workers or refugees, to the more recent Genesis project, a portrait of the most incontaminated places of our planet. With a kindness and a disarming simplicity, Salgado rebuilds his path, exposes his beliefs, makes us witnesses of his emotions. In this volume his talent as a storyteller and the authenticity of a man who knows how to combine activism and professionalism, talent and generosity, clearly emerge. The reader will discover fascinating stories of every corner of the world, both near and remote, from Africa to the Americas, and then again the birth of the Instituto Terra, of the Genesis project, of Magnum Photos and Amazonas Images.
This is the first full critical study of the work of the popular documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado. Nair explores all the stages of Salgado's work, including the recent more ecological subjects, showing its planetary commitments.
First published in April 2000, The Children and its companion volume, Migrations, have been garnering tremendous international attention ever since. Exhibited across the globe, from Brazil to Paris and Germany to New York, Sebastião Salgado's photographs continue to tour and to transform the perceptions of those who view them. As a testament to both their power and their relevance, a major exhibition of photographs from The Children was mounted as part of the United Nations Millennium Assembly in 2000.
Humanity on the move: Sebastião Salgado's searing reportage of exiles, migrants, and refugees It has been almost a generation since Sebastião Salgado first published Exodus but the story it tells, of fraught human movement around the globe, has changed little in 16 years. The push and pull factors may shift, the nexus of conflict relocates from Rwanda to Syria, but the people who leave their homes tell the same tale: deprivation, hardship, and glimmers of hope, plotted along a journey of great psychological, as well as physical, toil. Salgado spent six years with migrant peoples, visiting more than 35 countries to document displacement on the road, in camps, and in overcrowded city slums where new arrivals often end up. His reportage includes Latin Americans entering the United States, Jews leaving the former Soviet Union, Kosovars fleeing into Albania, the Hutu refugees of Rwanda, as well as the first "boat people" of Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans trying to reach Europe across the Mediterranean sea. His images feature those who know where they are going and those who are simply in flight, relieved to be alive and uninjured enough to run. The faces he meets present dignity and compassion in the most bitter of circumstances, but also the many ravaged marks of violence, hatred, and greed. With his particular eye for detail and motion, Salgado captures the heart-stopping moments of migratory movement, as much as the mass flux. There are laden trucks, crowded boats, and camps stretched out to a clouded horizon, and then there is the small, bandaged leg; the fingerprint on a page; the interview with a border guard; the bundle and baby clutched to a mother's breast. Insisting on the scale of the migrant phenomenon, Salgado also asserts, with characteristic humanism, the personal story within the overwhelming numbers. Against the indistinct faces of televised footage or the crowds caught beneath a newspaper headline, what we find here are portraits of individual identities, even in the abyss of a lost land, home, and, often, loved ones. At the same time, Salgado also declares the commonality of the migrant situation as a shared, global experience. He summons his viewers not simply as spectators of the refugee and exile suffering, but as actors in the social and political shifts of global information, urbanization, environmental damage, and vast discrepancies in wealth, which all contribute to the migratory phenomenon. As the boats bobbing up on the Greek and Italian coastline brought migration home to Europe like no mass movement since the Second World War, Exodus cries out not only for our heightened awareness but also for responsibility and engagement. In face of the scarred bodies, the hundreds of bare feet on hot tarmac, our imperative is not to look on in compassion, but in Salgado's own words, to temper our political, economic, and environmental behaviors in a "new regimen of coexistence."
A world renowned photographer's powerful, empathetic, troubling vision of people struggling against difficult odds while maintaining the dignity and sense of self that define the very roots of human existence.
The award-winning photographs of the drought-stricken Sahel region of Africa have documented the suffering and dignity of the refugees, giving a visual voice to millions of human beings who teeter on the edge of survival.
Originally published in 1965, and available once again in paperback, this landmark work dramatically documents the changing history of African wildlife, focusing on the widespread destruction of the African elephant. Beautifully illustrated with over 300 contemporary and historical photographs as well as dozens of paintings, The End of the Game is a legendary workvividly telling the story of explorers, missionaries, and big-game hunters whose quests have changed the face of Africa forever.
Published to coincide with the International Day of Struggle for the Land in April 1997, this book is a testament to Brazilian peasants and their courage.
Across the Ravaged Land is the third and final volume in Nick Brandt's trilogy of books documenting the disappearing animals of eastern Africa. The book offers a darker vision of this world, still filled with a stunning beauty but now tragically tainted and fast disappearing at the hands of man. In addition to a range of starkly powerful animal portraits, Brandt introduces some new themes, as humans make an appearance for the first time. He also contributes two essays summing up his photographic odyssey, which has taken more than a decade of intensive work to complete.
The first complete illustrated bibliography of 1,000 iconic photobooks created by members of the renowned photo agency Published on the occasion of Magnum Photos' seventieth anniversary, this fascinating in-depth survey brings Magnum's history alive through the genre of the photobook ? an essential vehicle for photographers to share their work. Its pages include unpublished behind-the-scenes material, together with ephemera from the photographers' archives about the making of their books. With an introduction by Fred Ritchin and texts by Carole Naggar, this book explores the evolution of the photobook, as well as the important role that Magnum has played in the history of documentary photography.
From Cairo to Cape Town In and out of Africa with National Geographic For over five generations, National Geographic magazine has dazzled and educated people with its incredible photographs and gripping stories from all corners of the earth. Inspired by our monumental Around the World in 125 Years, this volume curates around 200 captivating images sourced directly from the National Geographic historical archives, including 40 new photographs, that traverse the landscapes, history, cultures, and wildlife of Africa. Our continental journey through amazing Africa ranges from evocative early black-and-white pictures to autochromes, from the golden age of Kodachromes to digital. Along the way, we fly over the misty volcanoes of Uganda in a 1950s plane; follow archaeologists into the cool, musky tombs of Egypt; gaze up at the gleaming skyscrapers of Zimbabwe; admire the ritual masks of the Chokwe tribesmen of Angola; get lost in a labyrinth of alleys and souks in Algeria's old quarters; wonder at the fragile red-tufted flowers of South Africa's Drakensberg mountains; trudge behind Kenyan farmers as they battle clouds of flying locusts; and gingerly spy mountain gorillas enjoying the Rwandan sunshine. Long before the Travel Channel and Google Images, these images celebrated Africa's spectacular landscapes, incredible wildlife, and diversity--but also reflect edgier stories that speak of rural hardship, environmental threats, and the lasting remnants of forced colonization. Leaving no stone unturned, this definitive voyage is in equal parts a breathtaking homage to an incomparable continent, and a unique tribute to the world's most famous photography magazine.
Summary: In 1970, 26-year-old Sebastiao Salgado held a camera for the first time. In over 32 trips, he created a collection of images showing us nature, animals, and indigenous people. This book presents his images such as: ancient animal species and volcanoes of the Galapagos; Brazilian alligators and jaguars; and, African lions, leopards, and elephant.
A collection of Little Nemo's fantasy adventures, reprinted from the vintage comic strip.

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