Sensory-being: the enveloping of natural presentness and awareness in an unfolding sensory moment. Sensory Beings: people whose experience of the world, and meaning within it, is primarily sensory. Often these are people who do not have access to language. If you support someone who understands the world in a primarily sensory way, for example someone with PMLD or later stage dementia, you will recognise that they often face periods of time in which they are left without an activity they can access. This unique, practical guide helps you to plan and deliver sensory activities that lead people into a calm, focused state. You are even invited to let the person you support lead you into a state of sensory focus. Written by a leading sensory specialist this book will help you to: View the world as the person you support may view it, and identify times when a sensory-being activity may be appropriate. Understand how to select and create the most engaging, low cost, sensory foci to suit the specific needs of the individuals in your care. Effectively facilitate sensory-being sessions from start to finish so that the people you care for receive the full and many benefits of calm, focused time. Tried and tested in a diverse range of settings prior to publication, these techniques and practical tools have already helped many people provide an enriched experience of life for those in their care. Throughout the book you will find numerous case studies and insights from parents, carers, special school practitioners, therapists, research institutions and more so that you can benefit from this broad body of experience.
Sensory Stories are short stories of a few lines which are brought to life through a selection of meaningful sensory experiences. They are particularly beneficial for students with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other special educational needs (SEN). For children with PMLD, Sensory Stories can open up new avenues for communication and inclusive learning. For students with SPD and ASD, they offer a fun way of encountering sensory experiences and triggers in a safe, repetitive way, which over time can help to reduce associated anxieties. This accessible guide offers teachers, other professionals working with students with SEN and parents with a complete step-by-step guide to creating and using Sensory Stories effectively. Aiming to make Sensory Stories affordable and accessible to schools and parents alike by using everyday items found in the classroom and home, Joanna Grace provides original, ready-to-use Sensory Stories with accompanying lesson plans, games and activities and adaptations for different abilities and diagnoses. Written by an experienced SEN consultant and sensory learning specialist, this is unique and essential reading for teachers, other professionals and parents wishing to introduce the many benefits of multi-sensory storytelling to children in their care.
This book was developed from the author’s work with profoundly disabled children, their sensory impairment meant that traditional teaching was unsuccessful as they were unaware of the world around them. Flo Longhorn sets out a curriculum for developing each sense, both individually and in combination, using stimuli that can be varied according to the age of the child. This book shows how these techniques can be amalgamated to create multisensory experiences and how this new awareness can be integrated into the rest of the school curriculum. Designed for teachers, and parents, of children with profound multiple handicaps combined with sensory and physical impairment this has become a classic work.
Children and young people with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities (CLDD) have co-existing and overlapping conditions which can manifest in complex learning patterns, extreme behaviours and a range of socio-medical needs which are new and unfamiliar to many educators. Their combination of issues and layered needs – mental health, relationship, behavioural, physical, medical, sensory, communication and cognitive – mean they often disengage from learning and challenge even our most experienced teachers. This book provides school practitioners and leaders with an approach and resources to engage this often disenfranchized group of children in learning. The Engagement for Learning Framework has been developed and trialled by over 100 educational settings (both special and mainstream) with learners from early years to post-16. It gives practitioners from a range of disciplines a shared means of assessing, recording and developing personalized learning pathways and demonstrating progression for these children. The focus on inquiry means that however complex a young person’s needs, educators will be able to apply the approach. This practical and engaging book provides literature, tools and case study examples outlining who children and young people with CLDD are, why their engagement for learning is important and how the Engagement for Learning Framework can be used effectively by teachers and other professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for these children.
A fun and creative way to increase general well-being, improve concentration and self-awareness, and encourage relaxation in children aged 3-11, this book offers a hands-on guide to story massage. Central to the book are step-by-step, illustrated instructions for ten easy-to-learn basic strokes which are given through clothes on the back, head, shoulders and arms. These basic strokes have then been used to create over 25 story massages which vary in length and complexity. The stories range from traditional tales such as 'Humpty Dumpty' to hands-on learning stories such as 'Deep in the Rainforest.' The massages can be carried out by adults in one-to-one or group sessions, or taught to children to practice on each other. An enjoyable and interactive way of sharing the benefits and safe and appropriate use of positive touch with all children, this book will be of interest to parents and carers, bodyworkers, teachers and other school staff, care workers and arts therapists.
Sensory Stories contain just a few lines of text, and are brought to life through a selection of meaningful sensory experiences. They have been shown to be highly effective in helping care for people with dementia, and can enable them to engage with their memories, life history and more, in a way that would otherwise not be possible. Despite these benefits, there is very little guidance on how to incorporate this approach in everyday care. This book looks at how sensory engagement can help someone with dementia feel safe and secure, minimise their anxieties, support their cognitive abilities, as well as other benefits. Full of practical advice, this book provides everything you need to put Sensory Stories into practice. Written at a level suitable for both family members and practitioners, this innovative book will be invaluable for anyone supporting a person with dementia.
Inclusion is Dead is a provocative polemic against the widely held notion that inclusion for all children and young people with SEN is both possible and desirable. For those with severe learning difficulties (SLD) and profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD), the authors argue, it is neither. Imray and Colley assert that the dominance of inclusion has meant that there has been no serious attempt to look at the educational difficulties faced by learners with PMLD and SLD. As a vision of egalitarianism and equality for all, they say, inclusion is dead. The authors controversially believe that unless education changes, it will remain as a disabling institution that does the exact opposite of its intention. The book presents the argument that theorists of inclusion have failed to provide practical solutions on how inclusion can be achieved when SLD and PMLD learners are involved, as well as discussing the drawbacks of the ‘inclusion for all argument’. With up-to-date references throughout, Inclusion is Dead will be an insightful read for teachers and SENCO trainers, as well as postgraduates and undergraduates studying courses on politics, philosophy and society.
This book challenges the ways we experience, think about, and interact with children described as having profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). Contrary to received wisdom, the book starts from the premise that traditional psychological approaches operating in the "PMLD field" are overly reductive and constrain our abilities to listen to and learn from children with PMLD. This in turn runs the risk of maintaining exclusionary practices such as segregated education, where such practices are predicated upon the notion that some children are too disabled to participate in mainstream life.To address the situation the authors explore new terrain in three areas: theory, research and practice. The authors draw from phenomenological notions of embodied consciousness and introduce how this gives rise to novel ways of understanding the agency of children with PMLD. This critique leads to examination of interpersonal methodology as a means to access the experiences of children with PMLD, which in turn culminates in a research project examining how inclusive education could support learning for a young boy with PMLD. What becomes apparent through this story is that children with PMLD engage with the world in ways far more complex than existing approaches can take account of.
Multi-sensory environments in the classroom provide a wealth of stimulating learning experiences for all young children whose senses are still under development. Creating Multisensory Environments: Practical Ideas for Teaching and Learning is a highly practical guide to low-cost cost, easy to assemble multi-sensory environments. With a step-by-step guide to each activity, these creative learning environments focus on multi-sensory experiences and: are designed to stimulate all the sensory channels – auditory, visual, kinaesthetic, olfactory and gustatory include suggestions for extension or differentiation depending on the abilities of your pupils, or the time available encourage creative thinking and learning, and development of social and emotional skills feature clear learning Outcomes, linking with P-Scales for children with special education needs can be set up in your classroom or school hall in just a matter of minutes or be a semi-permanent feature in a small area of the classroom, convenient for use at any given moment. Although these activities will be of particular value for children with sensory impairments, they will also provide stimulating learning environments, as promoted in the themes and principles of the Early Years Foundation Stage guidance. Theory and background to multi-sensory learning is provided to enable you to adapt the suggested scenarios according to the needs of individual learners. This practical and easy to use book is an essential companion for busy classroom practitioners wanting to create a stimulating and meaningful learning environment.
Interactive storytelling, where the story is spoken or chanted, began as a way to include individuals with severe and profound learning disabilities in larger group activities, whether children at school or adults in day services. The stories are performed in call-and-response - one person calls out a line and the rest of the group respond either by calling back the same line or by calling out a pre-arranged response - and require no previous experience in drama or storytelling. They can be performed anywhere, by anyone. Various stories are explored, ranging from folktales and pantomime to poetry, the works of Charles Dickens, Shakespeare and stories from the Old Testament. Each extract details the full call-and-response for performing the story. This approach to storytelling can be used by teachers and group facilitators in a variety of settings and with any group of children or adults, irrespective of their level of disability. This hands-on manual will enable teachers, therapists, parents and anyone working with children or adults in community settings to use performance and recital to bring stories, drama and poetry to life for people of all abilities. 'This book is a useful resource...is simply written...is especially appropriate for people working with children and adults with speech, language and communication difficulties.' - Child Language Teaching and Therapy.
For teachers and SENCOs in all settings, this invaluable resource will guide you through a simple, systematic process of understanding why challenging behaviour is happening and give you some very practical, easily implemented strategies that all staff can use to help make things easier for the young people in your group. Key features include: a wide selection of different strategies for coping with challenging behaviour so that you can meet the needs of each individual pupil; a flexible framework with templates and tools to help you proactively plan approaches to challenging behaviour so that you and your colleagues can respond consistently and effectively; written by an experienced Educational Psychologist and based on proven strategies developed through years of practice in Special Schools as well as Primary and Secondary mainstream schools. Unlike other books addressing challenging behaviour, this resource offers a psychologically-based framework that can easily be implemented by mainstream teachers and SENCOs. It works!
This unique book features a collection of lively stories on the integration of Intensive Interaction practice into schools and adult service settings. It addresses communication development, both from a micro and macro level across a variety of service settings, with each chapter written by a different practitioner. These personal accounts cover individual practice and reflection with a single case-study person, as well as influencing organisational change. The authors assert that within adult services and educational settings, Intensive Interaction can be used as a way to develop communication and confidence and to work with the principles of inclusion and person-centred acceptance and support. The book develops an understanding of issues that can be addressed within training and mentoring other staff, and uses case studies throughout as a powerful training tool. Filled with practical advice and techniques to develop communication with people who find it hard to communicate, as well as guidance on ensuring the sustainable extension of the use of Intensive Interaction by embedding the approach within organisational ways of working, this book will be of value to anyone working within children and adult services for people with communication impairments.
How can I communicate even more effectively with people who have learning disabilities? Communicate with Me is an invaluable toolkit for carers, professionals, schools and services striving to improve the quality of their communication with those they support. Key features include: a comprehensive range of techniques and guidance for carers and professionals around how to communicate with and involve children and adults with learning disabilities; a wealth of practical examples and case studies to illustrate and contextualise the suggested approaches; a detailed quality assurance framework to help schools and services develop CPD, establish excellence across their organisations in the way that they communicate with people with learning difficulties and improve outcomes for those they support. Communicate with Me is a resource for anyone involved in supporting children or adults with a learning disability including residential or community support workers, play workers, advocates and teachers who work directly with people, as well as line managers and service managers who can facilitate change within service structures and promote good practice in their teams. Martin Goodwin is an experienced practitioner who has more than 18 years experience in working with children and young people in a range of capacities including management and direct delivery. Martin is a qualified teacher/ trainer in post compulsory education and children's rights advocate with a BA Hons in Professional Studies: Learning Difficulties, PG Cert in Social Studies and MA in Youth and Community studies. Jennie Miller specialises in working with adults with a learning disability in the residential setting where she has over ten years' experience, holding a management role since 2004. Jennie has a BA (hons) in Professional Studies: Learning Difficulties. Cath Edwards has over thirty years' experience of working with children and young people with learning disabilities including autism and severe and profound multiple learning disability. Cath has a BEd in education, a degree-level qualification in special educational needs, and is a Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming. Cath is also a qualified yoga teacher and a professional storyteller. Review: The publication of this resource is timely. Services are shrinking and specialist support is contracting. People with learning disabilities need informed, committed and skillful partners in their struggle to take their rightful place in society - and this accessible, interactive and comprehensive guide will prove an invaluable support to everyone who has the privilege and the challenge of sharing their lives and work with people who have difficulties in communication. Dr Nicola Grove, Consultant in Communication and Narrative, Honorary Senior Lecturer, Tizard Centre, Founder, Openstorytellers.
Challenging the notion that young people with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) should be taught in a linear, target-driven way, this book presents an innovative model for creating learning opportunities to suit the needs and abilities of each individual student. Focusing on students with PMLD aged 14 and over, and addressing their unique needs as they progress towards adult life, the author explains how to create a truly personalised programme for each individual that recognises their right to autonomy whilst also acknowledging their learning difficulties. Practical strategies for dealing with common areas of difficulty such as communication and behaviour are included, and the book contains useful solutions to practical considerations such as timetabling, staffing, assessments and target-setting, and adapting the physical and sensory environment for students with PMLD. A final section looks at opportunities for students with PMLD post-secondary education. Realistic and accessible, this book is essential reading for teachers, teaching assistants and others involved in educating young people with PMLD.
Playfulness is important; it creates an alternative space where emotional, cognitive and social dimensions can be explored and tested. This highly practical book explores the endless possibilities of using playful, creative and interactive activities to meaningfully engage with children with multiple learning difficulties or autistic spectrum disorders. The author presents playfulness as ‘an experimental frame of mind’, and encourages practitioners to play with roles, ideas, words, concepts and objects in order to enhance relationships and interventions. By providing accessible steps to playfulness, this text explores some of the contemporary issues surrounding the education of children with severe learning needs, in particular the use of ‘intensive interaction’. This text considers different areas of creative interactive work for practitioners to draw inspiration from, including: Music Interactive Musical Movement Finger Dance Story and Drama Artwork Reflective Circle. The varied array of tried and tested original activities have been devised to encourage the development of social interaction, cognition, play, experimentation and creativity, in particular but not exclusively, for children whose learning needs are more complex. The author also invites teachers working in mainstream, particularly early years and primary education, to investigate the creative possibilities inherent in playfulness and to use the activities in this book to enhance the learning environment. This text offers an abundance of advice, practical strategies and tips for teachers working in special and mainstream early years and primary education. Practitioners such as therapists, care workers, community musicians and creative arts specialists will also find this book useful.
Imagine a united consciousness, an awareness of which all of our minds are a part . . . and a potential way out of the division, greed, and destruction that threaten to engulf our world. In the 20th century, we were introduced to several subdivisions of the mind: the conscious, unconscious, subconscious, preconscious, and so on. But what we didn't know was that there was another level of consciousness, an all-encompassing, infinite dimension of shared intelligence: the One Mind. This universal consciousness connects all of us through space and time. Even now, as you read these words, you are participating in the One Mind. Emerging studies have shown that the One Mind isn't just an idea; it's a reality. In this book, Larry Dossey shares compelling research that supports the One Mind concept. These cases include experiences of: • Shared thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations with a distant individual • Communication between humans and sentient nonhumans, such as pets • Large groups of animals-flocks, schools, herds-behaving in highly coordinated ways • Acquisition of previously unknown knowledge from a person who has died • Hidden or lost objects found through mental means alone • Direct contact with a transcendent domain through near-death experiences Through engaging stories, fascinating case studies, and brilliant insights from great thinkers throughout history, One Mind explores the outer reaches of human consciousness. In it, you will discover a new way to interpret the great mysteries of our experience and learn how to develop the empathy necessary to engender more love, peace, and collective awareness. The result is a rich new understanding of what it means to be human and a renewed hope that we can successfully confront the challenges we face at this crossroads in human history. With One Mind, Dossey shows that we are not alone, that we are all one.
Intensive interaction is an approach to teaching the pre-speech fundamentals of communication to children and adults who have severe learning difficulties or autism, and who are still at an early stage of communication development. This book is a practical guide to help those wishing to implement intensive interaction in their setting, and it provides detailed advice and step-by-step guidance as well as a consideration of all the issues associated with carrying out this approach. It considers: - preparing for intensive interaction - observing intensive interaction in progress - doing intensive interaction at home and at work - teamwork - wellbeing - record-keeping This book is a straightforward guide for anyone wanting to use intensive interaction with people with severe and complex learning difficulties, people who have very severe learning difficulties, profound and multiple learning difficulties, multi-sensory impairments, and people who have a diagnosis of autism.
First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Curricula for Teaching Children and Young People with Severe or Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties offers a range of compelling arguments for a distinct and separate pedagogical approach to the learning needs of the most educationally challenging pupils. This book, written in accessible, common sense and non-academic language, provides an easy-to-follow alternative curriculum specifically designed to enhance and enrich the learning of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties. Chapter by chapter, guidelines and support are offered in key curriculum areas, some of which include: Cognition Language, Literacy and Communication Mathematical Physical Sensory Creative Care Play Problem solving. This highly practical resource is essential reading for any educational professional, parents, school governors, teachers, teaching assistants, therapists and indeed anyone involved with maximising the educational opportunities of those with profound learning difficulties.
On Looking begins with inattention. It is about attending to the joys of the unattended, the perceived 'ordinary.' Horowitz encourages us to rediscover the extraordinary things that we are missing in our ordinary activities. Even when engaged in the simplest of activities like taking a walk around the block, we pay so little attention to most of what is right before us that we are sleepwalkers in our own lives.

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