This book examine the role of the Oedipus complex in the psyche and relate it to urgent issues of social and cultural life, historical and current."Freud and Female Sexuality" (1975), the first paper included in the present collection, resulted from the debate which followed on the publication of Female Sexuality. The subsequent articles, written after 1983 and, for the most part, unpublished at the time when the author was invited to prepare this volume, cover a wide range of subjects, but are linked to each other and to the opening paper by an underlying theme: The role of the Father and the Mother in the Psyche.
Focusing on the novels of Charlotte Bronte, Wilkie Collins, and Thomas Hardy, Malane analyzes how these narratives of love, insanity, and tragedy were in dynamic conversation with the prevailing views about the brain."--Jacket.
A reexamination of the origins of modern science; discovers a forgotten heritage of women scientists and probes the cultural and historical forces that continue to shape the course of scientific scholarship and knowledge.
Sex, Mind, and Emotion is a collection of predominantly clinical papers, exploring innovative work in the field. The central tenet of the book is that sexual behaviour cannot be divorced from the emotional context in which it occurs or the meaning of that behaviour to the individual and therefore no chapter is about sex without also addressing mind and emotion. The book uses a fusion of psychoanalytic, systemic and cognitive theories in conjunction with public service practice. It deals with important and relevant topics such as the treatment of sex offenders; the compulsive use of internet pornography; the psychosexual development of adolescents growing up with HIV; the psychodynamics of unsafe sex; refugees and sexuality; services for people with gender dysphoria; psychological treatment for survivors of rape and sexual assault; and loss of sexual interest.
The first encouraging, sex-positive guide for all women survivors of sexual assault -- heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian, coupled, and single -- who want to reclaim their sex lives. While most books on the topic broach sexuality only to reassure women that it is all right to say "no” to unwanted sex, Healing Sex encourages women to learn how to say "yes” -- to their own desires and on their own terms. This mind-body approach to healing from sexual trauma was created by Staci Haines, who has been educating in the area of sexual abuse, sex education, and somatic healing for over 15 years. Her techniques are ideal for anyone looking for a new way to heal from trauma, beyond traditional talk therapy.
Feeling sexy begins in the mind. Using ground-breaking hypnotherapy and NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) techniques Sex in Mind reveals the secrets of how you can use your mind to have better sex. Great sex isn't just about toys, positions and partners; by exploring our inner thoughts, we can learn to recognize what we really want, get more of it, and improve what we're getting Sex in Mind explodes conventional wisdom about sex and sexuality. It is packed with practical information about attraction, flirting and seduction, while the accompanying CD is a delicious fusion of deep relaxation and guided erotic fantasy.
A ground-breaking psychoanalytic study on sexuality which maintains its originality today, thirty years after its first publication. The book is a revision of psychoanalytic theory, starting with the work of Freud himself and including Melanie Klein's contributions on the early Oedipus Complex and the Depressive Position. But more than that, it is a metapsychological study of sexuality which provides a different perspective from more well-known ones that relate simply to a descriptive or behavioural point of view. In differentiating adult sexuality from infantile sexuality and polymorphism and perversion, taking unconscious phantasy and the notion of the primal scene as the pivotal point, Meltzer proposes a unified theoretical and clinical model which has proved of particular help in the field of the psychopathology of addictions and perversions.
At a time when psychoanalysis is attacked by biologists, psychologists and literary critics alike, this book offers a radical defence. Literature, Psychoanalysis and the New Sciences of Mind gives a clear introduction to the theories of Freud and Jung, the strange linguistic rewriting of Freud by Jacques Lacan. It explores the extraordinary variety of ways in which these writings have been applied to literature and literary theory. But for the first time, they are put in the context of recent biological theories of mind and sexuality.
"In philosophy courses and textbooks, Spinoza is classified as a seventeenth-century rationalist philosopher, sandwiched between Descartes, who lived in the generation before Spinoza, and Leibniz, who lived in the generation after. Spinoza, however, has more in common with Eastern thought generally, and with Buddhism in particular, than he does with either of the two aforementioned philosophers." "This book presents Spinoza as a spiritual psychotherapist. Spiritual, because the goal of Spinoza's philosophical system is union with God; psychotherapist, because the path to this goal lies through an understanding and ultimate transcendence of our afflictive emotions." "Healing the Mind makes Spinoza's system of thought accessible and available to general readers, and provides important and novel insights for those already somewhat familiar with Spinoza's philosophy. It is written as a sort of intellectual self-help book, self-contained, free from footnotes, and as much as possible free from jargon. A series of reflective exercises, integrated into the text, aid the reader in applying Spinoza's philosophy to day-to-day life experiences. It is only by applying Spinoza's thought to our personal lives, through consistent practice, that we may free ourselves from bondage to our lower emotions and habitual behaviors, and begin to enjoy the "continuous, supreme, and unending happiness" which Spinoza promises awaits us."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
According to the popular imagination, psychoanalysis is about men wanting to sleep with their mothers and women wanting penises. Sexuality: Psychoanalytic Perspectives tells a different story about what has happened to sex in psychoanalysis over the past century. In the book, a range of distinguished contributors challenge the view that sexuality is nothing other than historically and culturally determined. Introducing the ideas of sexuality from the viewpoint of a number of theoretical schools, they then go on to offer contemporary psychoanalytic views of * Sexuality in childhood * Female and male sexuality (heterosexual and homosexual) * Sexual perversions Sexuality: Psychoanalytic Perspectives is a comprehensive introduction to the subject, covering its development over the last 100 years, and bringing it up to date for the 21st century. The book will make enlightening and essential reading for both professional and students involved in psychoanalyis, psychotherapy and counselling.
The Child is father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety. William Wordsworth, "Ode: Intimations of Immortality" Wallace Stevens said somewhere that the theory of poetry is the life of poetry.l Charles Darwin, who likes poetry, "recognized that at the eost of losing his appreciation of poetry and other things that delighted him in his youth, his mind had become a 'machine for grinding generallaws out of large colleetions of facts.' "2 Somewhere in between the polar positions of Stevens' extreme aesthetic belief and Darwin's extreme meehanistic belief lies the aesthetics of empirical thought and the whole modem Romantic tradition. There have been men in between who were both meehanists and poets, who both beIieved in automatic material meehanisms and tried to use the imagination. Erasmus Darwin was one of these "in between" figures. and since he lived early (1731-1802) in the modem scientific era he was one of the first. This older Darwin, the grandfather of Charles, has not been given due credit as a transitional figure in the development of the literature of our scientific era. Although historically and in terms of intelleetual stature the grandfather was a fanciful child compared to the giant grand soo, Erasmus Darwin's habits of thought anticipated one of the most distinguishing charaeteristics of his grandson. (The genetic suggestive.
The Oxford handbook of cognitive literary studies' applies developments in cognitive science to a wide range of literary texts that span multiple historical periods and numerous national literary traditions. The volume is divided into five parts: (1) Narrative, History, Imagination; (2) Emotions and Empathy; (3) The New Unconscious; (4) Empirical and Qualitative Studies of Literature; and (5) Cognitive Theory and Literary Experience. Most notably, the volume features case studies representing not just North American and British literary traditions, but also Argentinian (Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar), Chinese (Cao Xueqin), Colombian (Garcia Marquez), Dominican (Junot Diaz), German (Theodore Fontane), French (Marcel Proust, Gustave Flaubert), Indian (Mirabai, Rabindranath Tagore, Kamala Markandaya, Mani Ratnam, Tito Mukhopadhyay), Mexican (Fernando del Paso), Polish (Krystof Kieslowski), Puerto Rican (Giannina Braschi), Russian (Lev Tolstoi), South African (J.M. Coetzee), and Spanish (Leopoldo Alas). Moreover, the volume will cover a variety of periods (e.g.,0.
Whether enemy or ally, demon or god, the source of satisfaction or the root of all earthly troubles, the penis has forced humanity to wrestle with its enduring mysteries. Here, in an enlightening and entertaining cultural study, is a book that gives context to the central role of the penis in Western civilization. A man can hold his manhood in his hand, but who is really gripping whom? Is the penis the best in man -- or the beast? How is man supposed to use it? And when does that use become abuse? Of all the bodily organs, only the penis forces man to confront such contradictions: something insistent yet reluctant, a tool that creates but also destroys, a part of the body that often seems apart from the body. This is the conundrum that makes the penis both hero and villain in a drama that shapes every man -- and mankind along with it. In A Mind of Its Own, David M. Friedman shows that the penis is more than a body part. It is an idea, a conceptual but flesh-and-blood measuring stick of man's place in the world. That men have a penis is a scientific fact; how they think about it, feel about it, and use it is not. It is possible to identify the key moments in Western history when a new idea of the penis addressed the larger mystery of man's relationship with it and changed forever the way that organ was conceived of and put to use. A Mind of Its Own brilliantly distills this complex and largely unexamined story. Deified by the pagan cultures of the ancient world and demonized by the early Roman church, the organ was later secularized by pioneering anatomists such as Leonardo da Vinci. After being measured "scientifically" in an effort to subjugate some races while elevating others, the organ was psychoanalyzed by Sigmund Freud. As a result, the penis assumed a paradigmatic role in psychology -- whether the patient was equipped with the organ or envied those who were. Now, after being politicized by feminism and exploited in countless ways by pop culture, the penis has been medicalized. As no one has before him, Friedman shows how the arrival of erection industry products such as Viagra is more than a health or business story. It is the latest -- and perhaps final -- chapter in one of the longest sagas in human history: the story of man's relationship with his penis. A Mind of Its Own charts the vicissitudes of that relationship through its often amusing, occasionally alarming, and never boring course. With intellectual rigor and a healthy dose of wry humor, David M. Friedman serves up one of the most thought-provoking, significant, and readable cultural works in years.
From Kate Chopin and Virginia Woolf to William Faulkner and Doris Lessing, modern fiction surges with libidinal currents. The most powerful of these fictions are not merely about sex; rather, they attempt to incorporate the workings of eros into their narrative forms. In doing so, Joseph Allen Boone argues, these modern fictions of sexuality create a politics and poetics of the perverse with the power to transform how we think about and read modernism. Challenging overarching theories of the novel by carefully mapping the historical contexts that have influenced modern experimental narratives, Boone constructs a model for interpreting sexuality that reaches from Freud's theory of the libidinal instincts to Foucault's theory of sexual discourse. The most ambitious study yet written on the links between literary modernity and the psychology of sex, Boone's Libidinal Currents will be a landmark book in the study of modernist fiction, gay studies/queer theory, feminist criticism, and studies in sexuality and gender.
Prompting is the thematic thread that pervades the pages of this book. Its primary connotation is that of the prompter who is urgently called into action, at moments of anxiety, when narrative begins to fail. The central dynamic issue concerns the amending imagination as a prompting resource which, through creativity and the aesthetic imperative, can be invoked in this therapeutic space when the patient - through fear, resistance or distraction - is unable to continue with his story. Psychotherapy can be regarded as a process in which the patient is enabled to do for himself what he cannot do on his own. Shakespeare - as the spokesman for all other poets and dramatists - prompts the therapist in the incessant search for those resonant rhythms and mutative metaphors which augment empathy and make for deeper communication and which also facilitates transference interpretation and resolution. The cadence of the spoken word and the different laminations of silence always call for more finely tuned attentiveness than the therapist, unprompted, can offer. The authors show how Shakespeare can prompt therapeutic engagement with "inaccessible" patients who might otherwise be out of therapeutic reach. At the same time, they demonstrate that the clinical, off-stage world of therapy can also prompt the work of the actor in his on-stage search for representational precision.
This volume is rooted in two convictions: first, sexuality is far more comprehensive and more fundamental to our existence than simply genital sex, and, second, sexuality is intended by God to be neither incidental nor detrimintal to our spirituality but a fully integrated and basic dimension of that spirituality. The authors address what our sexual experience reveals about God, the ways we understand the gospel, and the ways we read scripture and tradition and attempt to live faithfully.
In The Passionate Mind, Joel Kramer asserts that "what we believe determines much of what we think and do: the way we move, the way we respond to people, how we think of ourselves, how we see the world in general." His basic message, stated in short, clear prose, is that passion is to be found only in the present moment, and mainly through becoming aware of the thoughts flowing through our minds, and through the primal process of observing our thoughts, they begin to self-correct. From the author of The Guru Papers, The Passionate Mind is a wonderful journey for anyone seeking to discover how to look at oneself.
This work reaches across the colour line to examine how race, gender, class and individual subjectivity shaped the lives of black and white women in the 19th- and 20th-century American South.
Examines Lacan's key seminar on sexual difference, knowledge, desire, and love.

Best Books