Sharing the Skies provides a look at traditional Navajo astronomy, including their constellations and the unique way in which Navajo people view the cosmos and their place within it. In addition, this book offers a comparison of the Navajo astronomy with the Greek (Western) perceptions. Beautifully illustrated with original paintings from a Navajo artist and scientifically enhanced with NASA photography.
EXPANDED AND REVISED 2017 Edition. Over 110 illustrations and photographs; this new edition includes 90 more illustrations than the 2005 book. ALONE AND UNARMED is the story of a lone US Army Liaison Pilot, Staff Sergeant Ernest Kowalik, flying the military's version of the 65-hp Piper "Cub," during the Italian Campaign in WWII. Flying without an Observer, because he was the "spare" pilot for the 88th Division Artillery HQ Battalion, Kowalik actually flew more than twice the average number of sorties and hours than the typical division Liaison Pilot, often at dangerously low altitudes. Artillery spotting and scouting for the 88th Infantry "Blue Devil" Division, he saw a wide variety of action, from destroying large enemy guns and rescuing supply caravans from ambush, to making possible several significant breakthroughs of enemy lines. Join Staff Sergeant (later Lieutenant) Kowalik as he relives significant episodes of the world's struggle for freedom in that time. "Directing artillery fire from an unarmed, unarmored light aircraft was surely one of the most dangerous tasks performed on a daily basis during World War II. Flying from rough, unimproved airstrips, often within range of enemy shellfire, added to the perils faced by Field Artillery pilots, as did the ever present threat of bad weather. Such operations are covered in graphic detail by Ernest Kowalik, whose "Alone and Unarmed" is a welcome addition to the small number of books on a little known aspect of WWII." KEN WAKEFIELD, author of Lightplanes at War, The Flying Grasshoppers, and Luftwaffe Encore. About the Editor/Continuation edition: John R. Bayer worked with Mr. Kowalik to reprint his 1968 memoirs in 2005. Following Ernest's passing, he was given permission by Ernest's children to reprint his memoirs. John has an extensive background in history and freelance writing, and an MA with an emphasis in screenwriting from the State University of New York.
This collection of papers is the fifth in a series of volumes on the work of the Comparative Austronesian Project. Reflecting the unique experience of fourteen ethnographers in as many different societies, the papers in this volume explore how people in the Austronesian-speaking societies of the Asia-Pacific have traditionally constructed their relationship to land and specific territories. Focused on the nexus of local and global processes, the volume offers fresh perspectives to current debate in social theory on the conflicting human tendencies of mobility and emplacement.
This book is the authors account of his experiences while riding through the snow-capped mountains of North India with three of his good friends on their trusted Royal Enfield motorcycles. The book chronicles the challenges they faced and the experiences they gained while trying to conquer one of Indias most dangerous roads. Also included in the book is information about the roads travelled and interesting facts about the places the quartet visited. The author has also mentioned a few tips he follows while preparing for a motorcycle journey on Indias roads.
Aerial delights: A history of America as seen through the eyes of a bird-watcher John James Audubon arrived in America in 1803, when Thomas Jefferson was president, and lived long enough to see his friend Samuel Morse send a telegraphic message from his house in New York City in the 1840s. As a boy, Teddy Roosevelt learned taxidermy from a man who had sailed up the Missouri River with Audubon, and yet as president presided over America's entry into the twentieth century, in which our ability to destroy ourselves and the natural world was no longer metaphorical. Roosevelt, an avid birder, was born a hunter and died a conservationist. Today, forty-six million Americans are bird-watchers. The Life of the Skies is a genre-bending journey into the meaning of a pursuit born out of the tangled history of industrialization and nature longing. Jonathan Rosen set out on a quest not merely to see birds but to fathom their centrality—historical and literary, spiritual and scientific—to a culture torn between the desire both to conquer and to conserve. Rosen argues that bird-watching is nothing less than the real national pastime—indeed it is more than that, because the field of play is the earth itself. We are the players and the spectators, and the outcome—since bird and watcher are intimately connected—is literally a matter of life and death.
Get ready for takeoff. The life of the flight attendant, a.k.a., stewardess, was supposedly once one of glamour, exotic travel and sexual freedom, as recently depicted in such films as Catch Me If You Can and View From the Top. The nostalgia for the beautiful, carefree and ever helpful stewardess perhaps reveals a yearning for simpler times, but nonetheless does not square with the difficult, demanding and sometimes dangerous job of today's flight attendants. Based on interviews with over sixty flight attendants, both female and male labor leaders, and and drawing upon his observations while flying across the country and overseas, Drew Whitelegg reveals a much more complicated profession, one that in many ways is the quintessential job of the modern age where life moves at record speeds and all that is solid seems up in the air. Containing lively portraits of flight attendants, both current and retired, this book is the first to show the intimate, illuminating, funny, and sometimes dangerous behind-the-scenes stories of daily life for the flight attendant. Going behind the curtain, Whitelegg ventures into first-class, coach, the cabin, and life on call for these men and women who spend week in and week out in foreign cities, sleeping in hotel rooms miles from home. Working the Skies also elucidates the contemporary work and labor issues that confront the modern worker: the demands of full-time work and parenthood; the downsizing of corporate America and the resulting labor lockouts; decreasing wages and hours worked; job insecurity; and the emotional toll of a high stress job. Given the events of 9/11, flight attendants now have an especially poignant set of stressful concerns to manage, both for their own safety as well as for those they serve, the passengers. Flight attendants, originally registered nurses charged with attending to passengers' medical needs, now find themselves wearing the hats of therapist, security guard and undercover agent. This last set of tasks pushing some, as Whitelegg shows, out of the business altogether.
Get ready to take flight as two certified flight instructors guide you through the pilot ratings as it is done in the real world, starting with Sport Pilot training, then Private Pilot, followed by the Instrument Rating, Commercial Pilot, and Air Transport Pilot. They cover the skills of flight, how to master Flight Simulator, and how to use the software as a learning tool towards your pilot’s license. More advanced topics demonstrate how Flight Simulator X can be used as a continuing learning tool and how to simulate real-world emergencies.
Life in the Skies is a unique compendium of tips, advice, anecdotes and tales from the storied career of life-long pilot, Captain Lim Khoy Hing. Captain Lim provides insights into every aspect of air travel – informing passengers of all the hidden mysteries of airplane safety and regulations, enlightening those who wonder how someone trains and becomes an international airline pilot, and entertaining readers throughout with anecdotes, tales and jokes from his own personal experiences in the air. Complemented with more than 40 full-colour personal illustrations of the Captain, Life in the Skies will be a valuable and useful guide for air travellers and budding-pilots alike!
Seventeen prize-winning short stories are contributed by Peter L. Lyons, Raymond Southall, Robert Bailey, Rachel Robertson, John Clanchy, Stephen Reilly, Gordon Phipps, Amy Dunkleberger, Christine Taylor, Robyn Hukin, Wendy Dartnall, Lainie Jones, Fred Flint, Nancy Christie, Peter Endersbee, John Howard Reid, and Sally Odgers. These award-winning prose pieces range across many genres, including personal experiences, humor, science fiction, fantasy, adventure, reminiscence, satire, and romance.
'Beyond Open Skies' offers a systematic comparative analysis of the legal and policy dimensions of airline deregulation by federal fiat in the United States and by supranational collaboration in the European Union. The book draws upon a variety of sources, including very recent developments in U.S. and EC international aviation law, policy, and diplomacy, to propose a genuine multilateral air transport system. It examines the potential of the 'open skies' initiative, in the aftermath of the new U.S./EC air transport agreement, to inspire a genuine globalization of the world's air transport industry in such crucial aspects as the following: cabotage; ownership and citizenship requirements; route selection; airline identity; capacity; pricing regimes; competition and public aid; regulatory harmonization; labor laws; provisions for charter and/or cargo transportation; fair operation of and access to computer reservations systems; authorization of code-sharing arrangements; alliances and antitrust immunity; and dispute resolution.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Air and Space Policy, Law, and Industry for the 21st Century, held in Seoul from 23-25 June 1997.
Life is very rarely dull or quiet when Sir Ian Botham is around. One of Britain's greatest sportsmen, 'Beefy' has always worked hard and played hard, and this book reflects that. Botham has compiled some of his favourite stories from a life devoted to cricket and brought them all together in one volume. With the help of his huge network of friends, colleagues, team-mates and opponents, he has put together a wonderful collection of the best and the funniest stories from the cricket world. Featuring contributions from legends such as Shane Warne, fellow commentators and former team-mates including David Gower, and many of the current England team, this is a book the reader can pick up and immediately be privy to some of cricket's strangest and most hilarious moments, from the player who turned up to a game without any clothes on to avoid being fined for wearing the wrong kit to the cricketing legend whose desire for a burger landed him in hot water.
The stunning biographical portraits in Modern Girls, Shining Stars, the Skies of Tokyo, some adapted from essays that first appeared in The New Yorker, explore the lives of five women who did their best to stand up and cause more trouble than was considered proper in Japanese society. Their lives stretch across a century and a half of explosive cultural and political transformations in Japan. These five artists-two actresses, two writers, and a painter-were noted for their talents, their beauty, and their love affairs rather than for any association with politics. But through the fearlessness of their art and their private lives, they influenced the attitudes of their times and challenged the status quo. Phyllis Birnbaum presents her subjects from various perspectives, allowing them to shine forth in all of their contradictory brilliance: generous and petulant, daring and timid, prudent and foolish. There is Matsui Sumako, the actress who introduced Ibsen's Nora and Wilde's Salome to Japanese audiences but is best remembered for her ambition, obstreperous temperament and turbulent love life. We also meet Takamura Chieko, a promising but ultimately disappointed modernist painter whose descent into mental illness was immortalized in poetry by a husband who may well have been the source of her troubles. In a startling act of rebellion, the sensitive, aristocratic poet Yanagiwara Byakuren left her crude and powerful husband, eloped with her revolutionary lover, and published her request for a divorce in the newspapers. Uno Chiyo was a popular novelist who preferred to be remembered for the romantic wars she fought. Willful, shrewd, and ambitious, Uno struggled for sexual liberation and literary merit. Birnbaum concludes by exploring the life and career of Takamine Hideko, a Japanese film star who portrayed wholesome working-class heroines in hundreds of films, working with such directors as Naruse, Kinoshita, Ozu, and Kurosawa. Angry about a childhood spent working to provide for greedy relatives, Takamine nevertheless made peace with her troubled past and was rewarded for years of hard work with a brilliant career. Drawing on fictional accounts, interviews, memoirs, newspaper reports, and the creative works of her subjects, Birnbaum has created vivid, seamless narrative portraits of these five remarkable women.
In the spring of 1882 James Meric and his pregnant wife Ivy had their lives changed forever. Their belongings had been loaded onto a buckboard in the early morning hours, as they were suddenly banished from their home in Virginia. After several months of hardship in a perilous country, they found the town of Plentiful nestled against the Eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains. They had a new baby and renewed hope. Others were coming to Plentiful and had their own reasons for making such a journey. They would all be tested by the rugged magnificence of an untamed land and by the cunning minds of those who inhabit the lawless frontier. Mike Taylor treats us to another fast paced novel about deceit, redemption, and unwavering belief.Plentifulis a rich story told through its lively and robust characters who take us on a breathtaking ride where nothing is for sure, not even the things we believe in.
The gripping personal story of a Falklands Fighter Ace. David Morgan, RAF officer and poet, relives his experiences during the Falklands War in this vivid memoir. On secondment to the Royal Navy when the Argentine invasion of the Falklands began and personally credited with shooting down two Argentine Skyhawks as well as enemy helicopters, Morgan was later awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Here he recounts his involvement in the first British air-strike against Argentine positions around Port Stanley and describes being first on the scene when enemy jets bombed the landing ships SIR TRISTRAM and SIR GALAHAD. Including the author's heartfelt letters sent back to England to close family and friends, HOSTILE SKIES dramatically recalls what it was really like to fight, live and love during the Falklands War.

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