This important and exciting title represents the first authoritative volume focussed on pelagic (open ocean) sharks as a group. Virtually every pelagic shark expert in the world has contributed to this landmark publication which includes the latest data and knowledge on pelagic shark biology, fisheries, management, and conservation. Pelagic sharks face unprecedented levels of exploitation in all the world's oceans through both direct fisheries and by-catch, and effective management for these species is contingent upon solid science and data, which this book brings together for the first time. All those involved in shark biology will need to have a copy of this book.
QLD Premier's Book Awards -- Shortlisted Science Writer Award Awarded a 2010 Whitley Certificate of Commendation for Natural History The largest, swiftest, highest-leaping, fastest-growing and most migratory fishes on the planet all live in the open ocean. Beautifully adapted to their world, they range from tiny drift fish and slow plankton-straining whale sharks to high-energy, streamlined predators such as tuna and marlin. Fishes of the Open Ocean, from Julian Pepperell, one of Australia's best-known marine biologists and world authority on oceanic fishes, is the first book to describe these fishes and detail their biology and the complex, often fragile world in which they live. This unique guide covers all major species including tuna, marlin, swordfish and pelagic sharks, as well as lesser-known ones such as flying fish, lancetfish, sunfish, pomfret, opah, louvar, fanfish and basking sharks.
* In-depth look at key shark features, such as skin, teeth, skeleton, and behaviour. * An authoritative collection, suitable for home or school. A spectacular collection of the fiercest, weirdest, and most extraordinary sharks. Look into the deep to find the incredible range of sharks that inhabit our oceans. There is so much more to sharks than just the scary reputation of the Great White. Stunning photos reveal these beautiful creatures' amazing anatomy, from the hammerhead's alien-like eyes, to the sand tiger shark's multiple rows of thorny teeth. Discover how some sharks use electromagnetism to find prey, while others use bioluminescence, and learn about the sharks' close cousins, the rays and sawfish. Also in the series: Creatures of the Night Creatures of the Deep Beasties in My Backyard
Behind most myths of the sea, behind most people's sense of fear and respect for the ocean, lurks the shark—the uncontested lord of the deep. Each year scientists try to counter the bad publicity that sharks receive during beach season, and now there is a growing general sense that these fish lead interesting lives beyond what their monstrous reputations would suggest. This guidebook is both a portable encyclopedia and a visually rich tribute to the shark. Complete with color photographs, drawings, graphics, and a series of species data cards, this volume presents the shark's history and biology in a thorough and un-intimidating way. Represented by over 350 known species and by others yet to be discovered, sharks are the result of an evolutionary process that began about 250 million years ago. This guide helps us to appreciate them as highly specialized ocean predators that combine primitive character traits with behavior typical of superior vertebrates. Covering everything from the legends surrounding sharks, to their fascinating evolution, to their anatomy and variety, to their different types of behavior, Sharks will be enjoyed by anyone wishing to understand more about this "favorite fish to fear."
From the Bahamas and South Africa to Shanghai, sharks are the object of an obsession: film stars go big-game fishing for them and shark's fin soup is a coveted status symbol in China. Elsewhere, people and sharks exist alongside each other: surfers tolerate their presence and eco-tourists swim with them. Yet, after millions of years of the shark s evolution and survival, the human fascination with these animals may eventually lead to their extinction. In this eye-opening adventure, which criss-crosses the globe, Juliet Eilperin examines why sharks remain nature's most awe-inspiring creatures. She also explores the fascinating ways in which humans relate to the ocean's top predator.
Inspired by the International White Shark Symposium in 2010, Global Perspectives on the Biology and Life History of the White Shark incorporates the most important contemporary research findings into a single peer-reviewed book. This beautifully illustrated reference represents a historic change in the context of White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) research. Once considered one of the most poorly understood and difficult sharks to study, this timely book recognizes a new sophisticated focus on the White Shark, raising its status from obscurity to enlightenment. The Global Perspectives on the Biology and Life History of the White Shark celebrates the White Shark as the most studied shark in the sea. Within the chapters one can find new insights into a vast range of topics, such as behavior, physiology, migration patterns, habitat preferences, daily activity patterns, molecular genetics, reproductive biology and new research methods. The book also delves into population monitoring and policy options for managers and researchers.
As the idle rich thronged the palatial hotels of the Jersey Shore in the summer of 1916, America was at its most self-confident. But the world's first industrial superpower was about to receive a series of terrifying shocks. Sharks, it was believed, were not man-eaters, so when a lone Great White shark began to develop a taste for human flesh, America went into total denial. Only after the most horrific attacks was the truth admitted - and an unprecedented national frenzy forced President Woodrow Wilson to mobilize the US Navy in an attempt to put nature back in its place. Combining history and adventure, this is the first book on the events that pitted 20th-century technology against an ancient, mythic enemy and became the model for Peter Benchley's JAWS.
An illustrated introduction to sharks that lived during the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras.
A salty story of friendship, adventure, and the explosive life that teems beneath the ocean The Lofoten archipelago, just North of the Arctic Circle, is a place of unsurpassed beauty—the skyline spikes with dramatic peaks; the radiant greens and purples of the Northern Lights follow summers where the sun never sets. It’s a place of small villages, where the art of fishing, though evolving, is still practiced in traditional ways. Beneath the great depths surrounding these islands lurks the infamous Greenland shark. At twenty-four feet in length and weighing more than a ton, it is truly a beast to behold. But the shark is not known just for its size: Its meat contains a toxin that, when consumed, has been known to make people drunk and hallucinatory. Shark Drunk is the true story of two friends, the author and the eccentric artist Hugo Aasjord, as they embark on a wild pursuit of the famed creature—all from a tiny rubber boat. Together they tackle existential questions and encounter the world’s most powerful maelstrom as they attempt to understand the ocean from every possible angle, drawing on poetry, science, history, ecology, mythology, and their own—sometimes intoxicated—observations, meanwhile pursuing the elusive Greenland shark. By turns thrilling, wise, and hilarious, Shark Drunk is a celebration of adventure, marine life, and, above all, friendship. Winner of the Norwegian Brage Prize 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Critics’ Prize for Literature 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Reine Ord Prize at Lofoten International Literature Festival 2016
For most people, sharks and fear go hand in hand. Renowned photographer and conservationist Chris Fallows maintains a more nuanced relationship with the super predator. Gasp-inducing in their immediacy and surprise, Fallows's brilliant photographs present these mighty creatures in a different light. Great White, the first publication to collect Fallows's work reveals the sublime beauty of sharks and provides a rare glimpse into the largely unseen world of great whites, hammerheads, and other breeds. Fallows captures these fearsome creatures both above water, as they intersect with humanity, and below, in their mysterious underwater domain. A one-of-a-kind portrait of the shark and a superlative study of the nature photographer's art, this collection is bound to turn heads and elicit a deep appreciation for the creatures that inhabit our oceans.
This book is the most thorough exploration to date of the many ways in which a wild creature has been absorbed, reimagined and represented across the ages in all of the major art forms. The authors consider not only how the identity of sharks in the natural environment became incorporated into a cultural environment but also how sharks came to be considered the most feared creatures in the open oceans as a consequence of this incorporation. Yet sharks are especially important in helping to maintain a balance that is essential to the health of the oceans. The book begins with a treatment of the three sharks at the top of global shark-attack files from scientific, economic and environmental perspectives. Subsequent chapters engage with cultural representations of sharks in poetry, drama, art, novels, screenplay adaptations and films. Through an exploration of the ways in which sharks have been represented in human culture through the centuries, this book alerts the global community to the importance of sharks as a common cultural heritage. It aims to change perceptions of sharks so that they can become more revered than feared. The authors of this book argue that an increased understanding of sharks should lead to the development of better strategies for shark and human interactions. This book will be of great interest to researchers and students of the Environmental Humanities, Cultural History and the Arts. It is also excellent supplementary reading for courses in Zoology and Marine Science.
At once feared and revered, sharks have captivated people since our earliest human encounters. Children and adults alike stand awed before aquarium shark tanks, fascinated by the giant teeth and unnerving eyes. And no swim in the ocean is undertaken without a slight shiver of anxiety about the very real—and very cinematic—dangers of shark bites. But our interactions with sharks are not entirely one-sided: the threats we pose to sharks through fisheries, organized hunts, and gill nets on coastlines are more deadly and far-reaching than any bite. In Sharks and People acclaimed wildlife photographer Thomas Peschak presents stunning photographs that capture the relationship between people and sharks around the globe. A contributing photographer to National Geographic, Peschak is best known for his unusual photographs of sharks—his iconic image of a great white shark following a researcher in a small yellow kayak is one of the most recognizable shark photographs in the world. The other images gathered here are no less riveting, bringing us as close as possible to sharks in the wild. Alongside the photographs, Sharks and People tells the compelling story of the natural history of sharks. Sharks have roamed the oceans for more than four hundred million years, and in this time they have never stopped adapting to the ever-changing world—their unique cartilage skeletons and array of super-senses mark them as one of the most evolved groups of animals. Scientists have recently discovered that sharks play an important role in balancing the ocean, including maintaining the health of coral reefs. Yet, tens of millions of sharks are killed every year just to fill the demand for shark fin soup alone. Today more than sixty species of sharks, including hammerhead, mako, and oceanic white-tip sharks, are listed as vulnerable or in danger of extinction. The need to understand the significant part sharks play in the oceanic ecosystem has never been so urgent, and Peschak’s photographs bear witness to the thrilling strength and unique attraction of sharks. They are certain to enthrall and inspire.
Sharks are in trouble. Fifty shark species are at high risk of extinction, and another sixty-three are threatened. Discover the work of scientists and conservationists as they study shark biology and morphology; research migration, feeding, and mating patterns; delve into human, climate, and other threats to shark habitat; and develop sophisticated technologies to aid sharks and shark research. See how scientists also educate the public about real and imagined fear of sharks and encourage citizen participation in shark conservation efforts. You can even adopt a shark!
Answering every conceivable question about sharks, authors Gene Helfman and George H. Burgess describe the fascinating biology, behavior, diversity (there are more than 1,000 species worldwide), and cultural importance of sharks, their close relationship to skates and rays, and their critical role in healthy ecosystems. Helfman and Burgess take readers on a round-the-world tour of shark habitats, which include oceans as well as lakes and even rivers (as far up the Mississippi as St. Louis). They describe huge, ferocious predators like (Great) White and Tiger sharks and species such as Basking and Whale sharks that feed on microscopic prey yet can grow to lengths of more than 40 feet. The mysterious and powerful Greenland shark, the authors explain, reaches a weight of 2,200 pounds on a diet of seal flesh. Small (less than 2-foot long) Cookiecutter sharks attack other sharks and even take a chunk out of the occasional swimmer. Despite our natural fascination with sharks, we have become their worst enemy. Many shark species are in serious decline and a number are threatened with extinction as a result of overfishing and persecution. Sharks: The Animal Answer Guide presents a perfect mix of current science, history, anthropology, intriguing facts, and gripping photographs. Whether your fascination with sharks stems from fear or curiosity, your knowledge of these animals will improve immensely when you consult this book.
A detailed guide to digital filmmaking technology takes readers through the entire process, from pre-production through editing to distribution, discussing the benefits of digital video, especially for independent filmmakers, and covers the technical specifics of the medium, including image composting, audio production techniques, the editing process, and more. Original. (Intermediate)
Marine biologist Pete Klimley swims with the sharks. He was one of the first scientists to free-dive among sharks, and he has spent nearly thirty years studying shark behavior, sometimes swimming in schools of several hundred sharks. From his firsthand observations he has learned that sharks are not the vicious man-eaters that we imagine, but fascinating animals with complex behaviors. Most people who think of sharks at all think immediately of great white sharks. But there are more than four hundred species of shark. Dr. Klimley has studied several species, most notably the great white and the hammerhead. (He describes the great white as the athlete among sharks, and the hammerhead as the Ph.D. of the shark world.) In The Secret Life of Sharks Dr. Klimley reveals the significant discoveries he made about hammerhead navigation and great white eating habits. By studying hammerheads gathered around underwater seamounts, Dr. Klimley learned that hammerheads rely on sophisticated tracking of ocean-floor magnetism to navigate. His long-term study of great white sharks off the California coast demonstrated that these huge sharks prefer to eat seals and sea lions because of the energy contained in their fatty bodies. They are selective eaters, not the man-eaters we expect, and they sometimes go weeks between meals. But Dr. Klimley did observe a ritualized behavior that great whites practice in order to avoid deadly disputes over prey that one shark has captured and another wants. Although we have learned a great deal about shark behavior, says Dr. Klimley, there is much that we do not know. Unfortunately we are destroying these magnificent creatures of the deep through overfishing and degradation of the oceans. Already some populations of sharks have declined steeply. Vividly written by one of the foremost authorities on sharks, The Secret Life of Sharks is a fascinating account of some of the world's most magnificent animals.
Look for hidden objects as you work your way through every scene, taking in all the sights. The wonderfully detailed illustrations create busy scenes which will keep children entertained. Not only this but your children will learn along the way, too! Fantastic spot book activities, combined with non-fiction settings, make for an informative and entertaining series. With interesting facts dotted on each page, further educational value is added to the books.
There’s only one thing worse than a Great White Shark and that’s a pack of them. On a clear day in Santa Barbara a troop of Great White Sharks kill 22 surfers. Driven by their prehistoric instinct to survive, these sharks find a new feeding ground and a new food source. As they leave their bloody mark up and down the California coast, can they be stopped? Can a single man or even a government stop these Great White sharks from claiming the California coast as their new feeding grounds?

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