"The range and detail of information in this book will make it a valued library addition to students of anatomy and physiology as well as those specializing in ichthyology." -- Northeastern Naturalist
A guidebook for the naturalist, commercial or recreational fisher, outdoor enthusiast, or beachgoer covers almost all species of sharks and rays that can be found in Gulf waters, and includes information on reproduction, sensory systems, feeding, and more.
An illustrated guide to the ninety-one species of sharks, skates, and rays found in waters along the coasts of North and South Carolina includes a description and notes on size, color, distribution, and occurrence.
A look at the way frightening but fragile sharks skates and rays live their lives Z99 a species-by-species account of the worlds principal shark types
A guidebook for the naturalist, commercial or recreational fisher, outdoor enthusiast, or beachgoer covers almost all species of sharks and rays that can be found in Gulf waters, and includes information on reproduction, sensory systems, feeding, and more.
This volume takes an in-depth look at the lives and habitats of sharks, exploring a range of species and their behaviour - feeding, courtship, and raising young. It takes an ecological stand-point, and provides information about threats to these animals, and what is being done about them.
This volume had its origin in a symposium on the Reproduction and Development of Cartilaginous Fishes that was held at the annual meetings of the American Elasmobranch Society and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in Charleston, South Carolina in 1990. The cartilaginous fishes, class Chondrichthyes, are a large and diverse group of fishes that include approximately 900 to 1100 living species of sharks, skates, rays and ratfishes. Throughout their history, which dates back at least 400 million years, they have been a successful major component of the marine ecosystem. The chondrichthyan fishes occupy a pivotal position in comparative and evolutionary studies of vertebrate reproduction and development. They are the oldest surviving group of jawed vertebrates and they possess both the adult vertebrate Bauplan and the vertebrate program of embryonic development. The major features of the female reproductive system, including its embryonic origin, structure, physiological function, and biochemistry, apparently were established early in vertebrate evolution and are fully developed in chondrichthyan fishes. These features of the female reproductive system have been retained during the evolution of the other classes of vertebrates. Much the same can be said for the male reproductive system. Moreover, viviparity, placental nourishment of developing embryos, and the hormonal regulation of these events made an initial appearance in this group. The 22 articles presented in this volume bring together a wide variety of complementary research by investigators from seven countries, allowing us to broaden the scope and implications of our studies while identifying opportunities for future research. The appearance of a volume on the reproduction and development of cartilaginous fishes is quite opportune. The continued existence of these fishes, which survived the great extinction events of Earth's history, is now threatened by overexploitation unless immediate steps for their conservation are undertaken. Knowledge of their reproduction and development not only is an end in itself, but is of critical importance in devising successful conservation and resource management strategies.
The Biology of Sharks and Rays is a comprehensive resource on the biological and physiological characteristics of the cartilaginous fishes: sharks, rays, and chimaeras. In sixteen chapters, organized by theme, A. Peter Klimley covers a broad spectrum of topics, including taxonomy, morphology, ecology, and physiology. For example, he explains the body design of sharks and why the ridged, toothlike denticles that cover their entire bodies are present on only part of the rays’ bodies and are absent from those of chimaeras. Another chapter explores the anatomy of the jaws and the role of the muscles and teeth in jaw extension, seizure, and handling of prey. The chapters are richly illustrated with pictures of sharks, diagrams of sensory organs, drawings of the body postures of sharks during threat and reproductive displays, and maps showing the extent of the species’ foraging range and long-distance migrations. Each chapter commences with an anecdote from the author about his own personal experience with the topic, followed by thought-provoking questions and a list of recommended readings in the scientific literature. The book will be a useful textbook for advanced ichthyology students as well as an encyclopedic source for those seeking a greater understanding of these fascinating creatures.

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