The focus of this study is on the ways in which skin color moderates the perceptions of opportunity and academic orientation of 17 Mexican and Puerto Rican high school students. More specifically, the study's analysis centered on cataloguing the racial/ethnic identification shifts (or not) in relation to how they perceive others situate them based on skin color.
In the aftermath of the 60s “Black is Beautiful” movement and publication of The Color Complex almost thirty years later the issue of skin color has mushroomed onto the world stage of social science. Such visibility has inspired publication of the Melanin Millennium for insuring that the discourse on skin color meet the highest standards of accuracy and objective investigation. This volume addresses the issue of skin color in a worldwide context. A virtual visit to countries that have witnessed a huge rise in the use of skin whitening products and facial feature surgeries aiming for a more Caucasian-like appearance will be taken into account. The book also addresses the question of whether using the laws has helped to redress injustices of skin color discrimination, or only further promoted recognition of its divisiveness among people of color and Whites. The Melanin Millennium has to do with now and the future. In the 20th century science including eugenics was given to and dominated by discussions of race category. Heretofore there remain social scientists and other relative to the issue of skin color loyal to race discourse. However in their interpretation and analysis of social phenomena the world has moved on. Thus while race dominated the 20th century the 21st century will emerge as a global community dominated by skin color and making it the melanin millennium.
Historically, residential segregation of Latinos has generally been seen as a result of immigration and the process of self-segregation into ethnic enclaves. The only theoretical exception to ethnic enclave Latino segregation has been the structural inequality related to Latinos that have a high degree of African ancestry. This study of the 331 metropolitan area in the United States between 1990 and 2000 shows that Latinos are facing structural inequalities outside of the degree of African ancestry. The results of the author's research suggest that Latino segregation is due to the mobility of Latinos and structural barriers in wealth creation due to limited housing equity and limited occupational mobility. In addition, Latino suburbanization appears to be a segregation force rather than an integration force. This study also shows that Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans have different experiences with residential segregation. Residential segregation of Cubans does not appear to be a problem in the U.S. Puerto Ricans continue to be the most segregated Latino sub-group and inequality is a large factor in Puerto Rican segregation. A more in-depth analysis reveals that the Puerto Rican experience is bifurcated between the older highly segregated enclaves where inequality is a large problem and new enclaves where inequality and segregation are not an issue. The Mexican residential segregation experience reflects that immigration and mobility are important factors but previous theorists have underestimated the barriers Mexicans face in obtaining generational wealth and moving from the ethnic enclave into the American mainstream.
Culture and Public Relations explores the impact of culture – societal and organizational – through the global lens of public relations. Structuring the volume around three themes -- culture as an environment for public relations; the culture of PR globally; and the impact of PR on culture -- the editors bring together compelling discussions on such questions as how spirituality, religion, and culture have affected public relations, and how public relations culture has been affected by the "corporate cultures" of business enterprises. Additionally, the volume provides studies on the effect of culture on public relations practice in specific countries. With contributors from Europe, Asia, Australia, and North America, this collection offers international perspectives on a topic that is growing increasingly important in public relations study and practice. It is required reading for scholars, researchers, and students in public relations and also has much to offer the business discipline, for those seeking to integrate culture and communication to their practices.
Developmental Psychopathology, Second Edition, contains in three volumes the most complete and current research on every aspect of developmental psychopathology. This seminal reference work features contributions from national and international expert researchers and clinicians who bring together an array of interdisciplinary work to ascertain how multiple levels of analysis may influence individual differences, the continuity or discontinuity of patterns and the pathways by which the same developmental outcomes may be achieved. This volume addresses theoretical perspectives and methodological issues, including cross-cultural perspectives, developmental epidemiology, self determination theory, and gender issues.
In Subversive Voices, Evelyn Jaffe Schreiber investigates the intersection of identity and culture as manifested in the novels of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Drawing on the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan as well as on various cultural studies theories, Schreiber offers provocative new insights into these two writers and what their work reveals about the possibilities of social change. Schreiber considers how blacks and women, through their "subversive voices" and articulation of difference, produce change despite the psychic and cultural structures that would determine identity. The author begins her examination of these marginalized voices by analyzing the patriarchal structure depicted in Faulkner's Go Down, Moses. She goes on to trace the subversive voices of women in the Snopes trilogy before considering the emergent voices of blacks in Faulkner's work generally, as well as specifically in Intruder in the Dust. In the second half of the book, Schreiber analyzes the articulation of difference that Morrison presents through the black and female characters of The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, Beloved, and Paradise. In Faulkner's work, Schreiber argues, nostalgia provides a screen that preserves the power of patriarchal structures and serves to "eroticize the other" for the dominant culture by using marginalized others to fulfill the desire for an imagined wholeness. Yet, in spite of this screen, agency--or empowerment--does emerge for these marginalized voices in Faulkner. In Morrison's novels, the absence of a nostalgic screen highlights these subversive voices: the dominant culture's eroticized, imagined other becomes a threatening entity and gains agency. Schreiber suggests that meaningful action and change can occur through encounters with what Lacan calls the "real," an awareness of the nothingness at the core of identity. Recognition of this "nothingness" allows the reality of the other to manifest itself and have agency in the social world. The works of both Faulkner and Morrison reveal--whether obliquely or directly--how subversive voices emerge to expose this lack. Such exposure then creates a form of self-awareness that can lead to cultural transformation. The Author: Evelyn Jaffe Schreiber is an assistant professor of English at George Washington University. Her articles have appeared in the Faulkner Journal, Style, Mississippi Quarterly, and other publications.
"Significantly advances the discussion about the connections among race, identity, military service, and armed struggle in Latin America during a crucial period of nation-building."--Hendrik Kraay, University of Calgary "Sure to become a standard part of the historical literature on the 'national' period in Latin America, these essays give an excellent ground-level view of the process of state formation through war."--Miguel Angel Centeno, author of Blood and Debt Military engagements in Latin America between 1850 and 1950 helped shape emerging nation states and collective consciousness in profound and formative ways. This century, known as the liberal period, was an important time for state formation in the region, as well as for the development of current national borders. This collection of essays aims to assess the role black and indigenous Latin Americans played in the military struggles of this period, and how these efforts contributed to the formation of ideas about race and national identity. While some indigenous people and Afro-Latin Americans came into closer contact with the descendents of colonizers as a result of military service, others turned inward with strengthened ties to their local communities. Many were at times victims of violent conflicts in Latin America, but they surprisingly also shaped the outcome of these wars and employed the wars to advance their own political agendas. The book offers exciting new interpretations and explanations of this key period in Latin American history.
A diverse group of academics, activists, officials and rebels contribute chapters about different aspects of conflict in the western Sudanese region of Darfur. These chapters discuss the origins and evolution of the conflict, the various ways in which the conflict has been understood and misperceived (both locally and internationally), the profoundly gendered nature of the conflict, the status of those involved with regard to the Sudanese and international law, and the ongoing struggle for peace in the region. A substantial appendix reproduces UN, ICC, and (many for the first time in English translation) Arabic-language documents to trace the history of the conflict. The book also includes a chronology of major events in Sudan.
Advances in genetics are renewing controversies over inherited characteristics, and the discourse around science and technological innovations has taken on racial overtones, such as attributing inherited physiological traits to certain ethnic groups or using DNA testing to determine biological links with ethnic ancestry. This book contributes to the discussion by opening up previously locked concepts of the relation between the terms color, race, and "Jews", and by engaging with globalism, multiculturalism, hybridity, and diaspora. The contributors-leading scholars in anthropology, sociology, history, literature, and cultural studies-discuss how it is not merely a question of whether Jews are acknowledged to be interracial, but how to address academic and social discourses that continue to place Jews and others in a race/color category.
An African-American parents' primer to guiding children through the difficulties of adolescence stresses the importance of teaching racial consciousness, social activism, and folk traditions.
The urgent debate over a multiracial category in the 2000 census forced the nation to reflect upon the important questions of what it means to construct and maintain a racial identity. Using in-depth interviews and survey data, Beyond Black documents how biracial people develop many different racial identities and how these self-understandings are derived from historical and contemporary social, cultural, interactional, and psychological processes.
Congratulations to Aida Hurtado and Karina Cervantez- winners of the 2009 Women of Color Psychologies Award! This award, given by the Association of Women in Psychology Association, is voted on by AWP members for contributions of new knowledge and importance to the advancement of the psychology of women of color. Offering broad coverage of all U.S. Latino groups, this volume synthesizes cutting-edge research and methodological advances and provides culturally sophisticated information that can be used by researchers, policy makers, and practitioners. The editors and contributing authors summarize theories and conceptual models that can further our understanding of the development and adaptation of U.S. Latino populations. In addition, they focus on the importance of cultural sensitivity and competence in research and intervention approaches and how to achieve it. Key Features • Highlights the normative development and strengths of U.S. Latino populations • Elaborates on the heterogeneity of Latinos in that it does not assume that all Latino populations, and the contexts of their development, are identical. • Emphasizes on cultural sensitivity and competence at all levels • Focuses on the importance of cultural identity amongst Latinos and its contribution to healthy developmental outcomes.
As colonists made their way to New England in the early seventeenth century, they hoped their efforts would stand as a "citty upon a hill." Living the godly life preached by John Winthrop would have proved difficult even had these puritans inhabited the colonies alone, but this was not the case: this new landscape included colonists from Europe, indigenous Americans, and enslaved Africans. In Race and Redemption in Puritan New England, Richard A. Bailey investigates the ways that colonial New Englanders used, constructed, and re-constructed their puritanism to make sense of their new realities. As they did so, they created more than a tenuous existence together. They also constructed race out of the spiritual freedom of puritanism.
Among the nearly 90,000 Cubans who settled in New York City and Miami in the 1940s and 1950s were numerous musicians and entertainers, black and white, who did more than fill dance halls with the rhythms of the rumba, mambo, and cha cha cha. In her history of music and race in midcentury America, Christina D. Abreu argues that these musicians, through their work in music festivals, nightclubs, social clubs, and television and film productions, played central roles in the development of Cuban, Afro-Cuban, Latino, and Afro-Latino identities and communities. Abreu draws from previously untapped oral histories, cultural materials, and Spanish-language media to uncover the lives and broader social and cultural significance of these vibrant performers. Keeping in view the wider context of the domestic and international entertainment industries, Abreu underscores how the racially diverse musicians in her study were also migrants and laborers. Her focus on the Cuban presence in New York City and Miami before the Cuban Revolution of 1959 offers a much needed critique of the post-1959 bias in Cuban American studies as well as insights into important connections between Cuban migration and other twentieth-century Latino migrations.
Recognizing and respecting cultural and ethnic differences, while, at the same time, guaranteeing the equality of treatment, seems like a paradox. However, it is among the crucial challenges that plural democracies are faced with today. The challenges include multiple problems, such as the struggle for recognition of cultural minorities or the actualization of universal human rights. The contributions to this anthology discuss these issues, with the goal of combining knowledge and opinions from various disciplines and multiple cultures in order to unfold the complexity and variety of questions that have to be solved, so that public spaces can be seen as environments of intercultural recognition. (Series: Political Philosophy and Anthropological Studies. Politische Philosophie und Anthropologische Studien - Vol. 2)
Multicultural Perspectives in Social Work Practice with Families is in its thirdedition and continues to expand the depth and breadth with which culturemay be understood and the impact of culture in working with families.Congress, Gonzalez, and their contributors have updated this text to includea focus on evidence-based practice, 10 additional chapters, revision of avaluable assessment tool, and a culturagram. This book clearly is an essentialresource for social workers committed to culturally sensitive practice."--Journal of Teaching in Social Work Encompassing the most current issues faced by multicultural families across the lifespan and the social workers who serve them, this popular textbook contains ten new chapters and provides content that has been significantly expanded throughout. These new and reconceived chapters offer professors and social work graduate students a broader and more comprehensive take on the key issues that arise when treating families from diverse cultural backgrounds and current, evidence-based models for assessment and treatment. New chapters include: Evidence-based models of care for ethnically-diverse families Practice with Asian-American families Practice with Native American and indigenous families Practice with Hispanic families Practice with Arab families Practice with adolescents Practice with families when there is risk of suicide Practice with families dealing with substance use and abuse Practice with families around health issues Legal issues with immigrants Contributors to the text are leaders in the field of multicultural issues that encompass a wide range of racial and ethnic populations. Updated case studies, vignettes, and statistical data illustrate the book's content.
What is it that gives many of us White people a visceral fear about discussing race? Do you realize that being able to not think about or talk about it is a uniquely White experience? Do you warn your children about how people might react to them; find store staff following or watching you; get stopped by the police for no reason? The students of color in your classroom experience discrimination every day, in small and large ways. They don’t often see themselves represented in their textbooks, and encounter hostility in school, and outside. For them race is a constant reality, and an issue they need, and want, to discuss. Failure to do so can inhibit their academic performance. Failure to discuss race prevents White students from getting a real, critical and deep understanding of our society and their place in it. It is essential for the well-being of all students that they learn to have constructive conversations about the history of race in this country, the impact of racism on different ethnic communities, and how those communities and cultures contribute to society. The need to model for our students how to talk openly and comfortably about race is critical in America today, but it is still an issue that is difficult to tackle. To overcome the common fear of discussing race, of saying “something wrong”, this book brings together over thirty contributions by teachers and students of different ethnicities and races who offer their experiences, ideas, and advice. With passion and sensitivity they: cover such topics as the development of racial consciousness and identity in children; admit their failures and continuing struggles; write about creating safe spaces and the climate that promotes thoughtful discussion; model self-reflection; demonstrate the importance of giving voice to students; recount how they responded to racial incidents and used current affairs to discuss oppression; describe courses and strategies they have developed; explain the “n” word; present exercises; and pose questions. For any teacher grappling with addressing race in the classroom, and for pre-service teachers confronting their anxieties about race, this book offers a rich resource of insights, approaches and guidance that will allay fears, and provide the reflective practitioner with the confidence to initiate and respond to discussion of race, from the pre-school and elementary classroom through high school.
"This book is excellent in its coverage of neurobiological underpinnings through perception, measurement, and communication...a great resource for researchers and clinicians." Score: 94, 4 stars. --Doody's Medical Reviews "This is an expertly constructed volume, due mainly to an expert composition of authors forthe individual chapters. Every chapter is like opening a door to a different laboratory, eachexamining a unique corner of the tactile research universe."--PsycCRITIQUES "...a solid, authoritative resource."--New Hampshire Nurses Association Touch has received increased attention over the last few decades, with growing recognition of its profound import to all facets of life. The Handbook of Touch is the first authoritative, state-of-the-art resource for scientists, scholars, and students interested in the neurobehavioral foundations of touch and its many applications. This text provides an in-depth overview of the conceptual and empirical scope of the field. Chapters are written by a cadre of internationally known experts on touch, representing an expansive breadth of knowledge from behavioral, health, and neuroscience disciplines. Key Features: Integrates knowledge regarding the neurobiology of touch, covering the spectrum from skin physiology and somatosensory pathways to touch-related genes and proteins Synthesizes research about the neural processing and perception of touch Describes diverse methods for measuring touch behavior and human response to touch Discusses the role of touch in social communication, along with the influence of context and culture Presents cutting edge research that links touch to brain organization and plasticity, human development, and varied dimensions of health
The latest edition of Pediatric Dermatology, edited by Lawrence A. Schachner, MD and Ronald C. Hansen, MD brings you the detailed guidance you need to effectively diagnose and treat pediatric skin conditions. Review topics from keratinization to stem cell therapy, and gain expert guidance from international contributors. Now in a comprehensive format with 40% all new clinical photos, this resource is ideal for clinical practice. Refer to full-color photographs that accurately capture the appearance of a wide range of skin disorders. Access many new tables and therapeutic algorithms for at-a-glance guidance. Recognize distinguishing factors in skin lesions with 40% new and improved clinical photographs. Find extended coverage of topics like genodermatoses and disorders of keratinization, review excellent information on skin neoplasms in children, new systemic therapies, and viral disorders, and explore new concepts in autoinflammatory disorders and Kawasaki’s disease. Read up on best practices and stay at the forefront of your profession with new perspectives from a host of international contributors like new Associate Editor Antonio Torrello, who co-edits the Pediatric Dermatology journal.

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