In this ground breaking new book David Block proposes a new working definition of social class in applied linguistics. Traditionally, research on language and identity has focused on aspects such as race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, religion and sexuality. Political economy, and social class, as an identity inscription, have been undervalued. This book argues that increasing socioeconomic inequality, which has come with the consolidation of neoliberal policies and practices worldwide, requires changes in how we think about identity and proposes that social class should be brought to the fore as a key construct. Social Class in Applied Linguistics begins with an in-depth theoretical discussion of social class before considering the extent to which social class has been a key construct in three general areas of applied linguistics- sociolinguistics, bi/multilingualism and second language acquisition and learning research. Throughout the book, Block suggests ways in which social class might be incorporated into future applied linguistics research. A critical read for postgraduate students and researchers in the areas of applied linguistics, language education and TESOL.
The Applied Linguistics Review is a peer reviewed annual publication. It aims to serve as a testing ground for the articulation of original ideas and approaches in the study of real-world issues in which language plays a crucial role, by bringing together new empirical and theoretical research and critical reflections of current debates. The issues dealt with in the Review range from aspects of the linguistic and communicative competence of the individual such as bilingualism and multilingualism, first or second language acquisition, literacy, language disorders, to language and communication related problems in and between societies such as linguistic discrimination, language conflict, communication in the workplace, language policy and language planning, and language ideology
Genre theory in the past few years has contributed immensely to our understanding of the way discourse is used in academic, professional and institutional contexts. However, its development has been constrained by the nature and design of its applications, which have invariably focused on language teaching and learning, or communication training and consultation. This has led to the use of simplified and idealised genres. In contrast to this, the real world of discourse is complex, dynamic and unpredictable. This tension between the real world of written discourse and its representation in applied genre-based literature is the main theme of this book.
The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity provides a clear and comprehensive survey of the field of language and identity from an applied linguistics perspective. Forty-one chapters are organised into five sections covering: theoretical perspectives informing language and identity studies key issues for researchers doing language and identity studies categories and dimensions of identity identity in language learning contexts and among language learners future directions for language and identity studies in applied linguistics Written by specialists from around the world, each chapter will introduce a topic in language and identity studies, provide a concise and critical survey, in which the importance and relevance to applied linguists is explained and include further reading. The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity is an essential purchase for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and TESOL. Advisory board: David Block (Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats/ Universitat de Lleida, Spain); John Joseph (University of Edinburgh); Bonny Norton (University of British Colombia, Canada).
The authors explore some of the ways in which standardization, ideology and linguistics are interrelated. Through a number of case studies they show how concepts such as grammaticality and structural change covertly rely on a false conceptualization of language, one that derives ultimately from standardization.
Language and Neoliberalism examines the ways in which neoliberalism, or the ideology of market rule, finds expression in language. In this groundbreaking original study, Holborow shows at once the misleading character of ideological meaning and the underlying social reality from which that meaning emerges. In universities, it is now the norm to use terms like entrepreneurial and business partnerships. How have these terms become a core component of education and gained such force? Markets have become, metaphorically, a power in their own right. They now tell governments how to act and warn them against too much public spending. Post-crash, the capitalist market continues to be crisis-prone, and in that context the neoliberal ideology remains contested. Free of jargon and assuming no specialist knowledge, this book will strike a chord internationally by showing how neoliberal ideology has, literally, gone global in language. Drawing on Vološinov and Bakhtin, Williams and Gramsci, and introducing concepts from Marxist political economy, Language and Neoliberalism is essential reading for all interested in the intersection of linguistics/applied linguistics and politics.
This is a classic book on a fascinating subject. Peter Trudgill examines the close link between language and society and the many factors that influence the way we speak. These range from gender, environment, age, race, class, region and politics. Trudgill's book surveys languages and societies from all over the world drawing on examples from Afrikaans to Yiddish. He has added a fascinating chapter on the development of a language as a result of a non-native speaker's use of it. Compelling and authoritative, this new edition of a bestselling book is set to redraw the boundaries of the study of sociolinguistics.
Spätestens als Lehman Brothers im September 2008 Insolvenz anmelden mußte, hatte es für einen kurzen Moment den Anschein, als habe die letzte Stunde des Neoliberalismus geschlagen: Nachdem das Mantra vom Markt und von der Privatisierung seit den siebziger Jahren in aller Munde war, sollten nun die Regierungen eingreifen, um systemrelevante Banken zu retten. Die Kompetenz der Wirtschaftsführer stand massiv in Frage. Heute, nur drei Jahre später, bekommen die Manager wieder riesige Boni. Zur Refinanzierung der Rettungspakete werden Sozialleistungen gekürzt. Die Logik des radikalen Wettbewerbs und des unternehmerischen Selbst prägt nach wie vor unsere Mentalität. Wie ist das möglich? Diese Frage stellt Colin Crouch in seinem großen neuen Essay. Der Autor des vielbeachteten Bestsellers »Postdemokratie« zeichnet die Ideengeschichte des Neoliberalismus nach und betont, daß der Konflikt Staat vs. Markt zu kurz greift: Es sind die gigantischen transnationalen Konzerne, unter denen die Demokratie »und« das Marktmodell leiden. Doch wir können uns wehren, indem wir uns auf unsere Werte und unsere Macht als Verbraucher besinnen. Das ist Crouchs optimistische Vision einer sozialen und demokratischen Marktwirtschaft.
This book explores neoliberalism – a view of the world that puts the market at its centre- from the perspective of applied linguistics. Neoliberalism and Applied Linguistics argues that while applied linguistics has become more interdisciplinary in orientation, it has ignored or downplayed the role of political economy, namely the way in which social, political and economic factors relate to one another within the context of a capitalist economy. The authors take the view that engagement with political economy is central to any fully rounded analysis of language and language-related issues in the world today and their collaboration in this volume represents an initial attempt to redress what they perceive to be an imbalance in the field. The book begins with a discussion of neoliberalism and an analysis of the ways in which neoliberal ideology impacts on language. This is followed by a discussion of how globalization and identity have been conceptualised in applied linguistics in ways which have ignored the political centrality of class – a concept which the authors see as integral to their perspective. The book concludes with an analysis of the ways in which neoliberal ideology plays out in two key areas of applied linguistics - language teaching and language teacher education. Neoliberalism and Applied Linguistics is essential reading for advanced undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in applied linguistics.
This volume contains the papers read at the Second Sociolinguistics Conference of the Association Belge de Linguistique Appliquee (Belgian Association of Applied Linguistics) that was held at the University of Antwerp on the in May, 1980. The papers are grouped around two topics: 'Language and Social Class' and 'Language Attitudes'. The whole is preceded by an introductory article by R. Van Hout in which he presents the Netherlandic language area, describes how sociolinguistics is developing in this area and briefly discusses the essence of each paper.
Dieter Hillert untersucht, wie Bausteine der sprachlichen Evolution diskutiert werden können und wie sich diese in Bezug auf den modernen Menschen entwickelt haben. Insbesondere die hier vorgestellten neuronalen Kartierungsmethoden ermöglichen, wichtige Ergebnisse über die neuronalen Schaltkreise zu gewinnen, die an der Sprachverarbeitung beteiligt sind. Der Autor verdeutlich zudem kortikale Kartierungen sowohl bei typischem und als auch bei atypischem Sprachverhalten. Entsprechend wird aus diesen angesprochenen Perspektiven besprochen, wie sich unser Sprachvermögen evolutionär entwickelten hat, um beispielsweise Ideen, Gefühle, Ziele und Humor lautsprachlich vermitteln zu können. Das vorgestellte evolutionäre Sprachmodell beruht auf den kognitiven Fähigkeiten unserer biologischen Vorahnen.
This unique work analyzes the crisis in modern society, building on the ideas of the Frankfurt School thinkers. Emphasizing social evolution and learning processes, it argues that crisis is mediated by social class conflicts and collective learning, the results of which are embodied in constitutional and public law. First, the work outlines a new categorical framework of critical theory in which it is conceived as a theory of crisis. It shows that the Marxist focus on economy and on class struggle is too narrow to deal with the range of social conflicts within modern society, and posits that a crisis of legitimization is at the core of all crises. It then discusses the dialectic of revolutionary and evolutionary developmental processes of modern society and its legal system. This volume in the Critical Theory and Contemporary Society by a leading scholar in the field provides a new approach to critical theory that will appeal to anyone studying political sociology, political theory, and law.
The papers in this second volume show some of the results of the empirical exploration of Bernstein's hypothesis. The volume represents a significant contribution not only to the study of the sociology of language, but also to education and the social sciences. "This collection demonstrates the magnitude of Bernstein's pioneering contribution to socio-linguistic studies" - S. John Eggleston, Times Educational Supplement
This book explores corpus linguistics in language learning and research.
Studies in honour of H G Widdowson. Principle and Practice in Applied Linguistics provides a comprehensive overview of the many and diverse areas in applied linguistics today. The papers range from second language acquisition to discourse analysis, corpus lingustics, and classroom practice; together they emphasize the reciprocal relationship of principle and practice, and the interdisciplinary nature of applied lingustics.
This collection of essays developed out of a conference held in Hong Kong in 1988. The aim was to provide a forum for an exchange of views between academics working within the field of sociolinguistics, in particular between those working in the West and those working in the East. Sociolinguistics Today has taken this aim a step further to produce an overview of contemporary research into sociolinguistics worldwide. The book contains articles by acknowledged leaders in the study of language and society, and the presence of sociolinguists working in Asia provides a new and exciting challenge to the hitherto western-dominated field. The comprehensive study of Asian sociolinguistics is unique and engages with the non-Asian contributions to great effect. The range of contributors reinforces the international emphasis of the book.

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