There are continuing difficulties within social science surrounding concepts of race. This book suggests that these difficulties stem from the uncertain ontological and epistemological status of ideas about race, itself a consequence of the recognition that concepts of race have all but lost their relevance as sociologically significant descriptions. This book surveys ways in which social scientists have attempted to come to terms with this situation, before developing an alternative approach based on recent work by realist authors. This approach offers a radical revision of orthodox debates about race concepts, about the possibility of a social science and about the nature of empirical research. This illustrated through two policy examples: an account of post war migration to the UK, and debates about trans-racial adoption in the UK and the USA.
This book offers a critical analysis of core concepts that have influenced contemporary conversations about environment-society relations in academic, political, and civil circles. Considering these conceptualizations are currently shaping responses to environmental crises in fundamental ways, critical reflections on concepts such as the Anthropocene, metabolism, risk, resilience, environmental governance, environmental justice and others, are well-warranted. Contributors to this volume, working across a multitude of areas within environmental social science, scrutinize underlying worldviews and assumptions, asking a common set of key questions: What are the different concepts able to explain? How do they take into account society-environment relations? What social, cultural, or geo-political biases and blinders are inherent? What actions or practices do the concepts inspire? The transdisciplinary engagement and reflexivity regarding concepts of environment-society relations represented in these chapters is needed in all spheres of society—in academia, policy and practice—not the least to confront current tendencies of anti-reflexivity and denialism.
Despite the swift spread of social network concepts and their applications and the rising use of network analysis in social science, there is no book that provides a thorough general introduction for the serious reader. Understanding Social Networks fills that gap by explaining the big ideas that underlie the social network phenomenon. Written for those interested in this fast moving area but who are not mathematically inclined, it covers fundamental concepts, then discusses networks and their core themes in increasing order of complexity. Kadushin demystifies the concepts, theories, and findings developed by network experts. He selects material that serves as basic building blocks and examples of best practices that will allow the reader to understand and evaluate new developments as they emerge. Understanding Social Networks will be useful to social scientists who encounter social network research in their reading, students new to the network field, as well as managers, marketers, and others who constantly encounter social networks in their work.
`This clearly written and user-friendly book is ideal for students or researchers who wish to get a basic, but solid grasp of a topic and see how it fits with other topics. By following the links a student can easily and efficiently build up a clear conceptual map of social research' - Malcolm Williams, Reader in Sociology, Cardiff University `This is a really useful book, written in an accessible manner for students beginning their study of social research methods. It is helpful both as an introductory text and as a reference guide for more advanced students. Most of the key topics in methods and methodology are covered and it will be suitable as a recommended text on a wide variety of courses' - Clive Seale, Brunel University At last, an authoritative, crystal-clear introduction to research methods which really takes account of the needs of students for accessible, focused information to help with undergraduate essays and exams. The key concepts discussed here are based on a review of teaching syllabi and the authors' experience of many years of teaching. Topics range over qualitative and quantitative approaches and combine practical considerations with philosophical issues. They include several new topics, like internet and phone polling, internet searches, and visual methods. Each section is free-standing, can be tackled in order, but with links to other sections to enable students to cross-reference and build up a wider understanding of central research methods. To facilitate comprehension and aid study, each section begins with a definition. It is followed by a summary of key points with key words and guides to further reading and up-to-date examples. The book is a major addition to undergraduate reading lists. It is reliable, allows for easy transference to essays and exams and easy to use, and exceptionally clearly written for student consumption. The book answers the needs of all those who find research methods daunting, and for those who have dreamt of an ideal introduction to the subject.
This sixth edition continues to expand the students mind through a series of probing questions, sociological theories and facts, which further go on and illustrate the issues and concepts that are faced by societies and cultures around the world. Larger trim size and new page design. - Study and Review sections at the end of chapters have been completely revised and expanded. All material now organized around the headings for major sections in the chapter. - More practice tests overall, and types of questions, including matching, multiple choice, true-false, concept completion, critical thinking, and questions that test understanding of tables and figures in the book. - New PowerPoint lecture presentation for instructors. - Chapters open with a set of Myths and Facts to show that much of what people belleve about social life is either wrong or oversimpllfied. - A boxed feature called Other Worlds, Other Ways Illustrates sociological concepts and issues in the context of societies and cultures around the world. - Applying Sociology boxes in each chapter show how sociological theory and research not only lead to greater understanding, but often guide the search for solutions to
This revised and updated edition of the highly successful sociology textbook, Contemporary Sociology, continues to throw light on key issues and concerns of present-day society. M. Francis Abraham's vast experience and extensive research cuts across conventional themes and geographical boundaries to include: -Theoretical perspectives and research methods -Key concepts and theories -Relevant issues in education, economy, politics, population, stratification, minorities, urbanization, and environment -Social institutions, organizations, and recent trends of change -Examples drawn from numerous cultural contexts This second edition introduces the following new concepts in a comparative perspective: -Theoretical perspectives in a global age -Crystallization of social interaction -Race, gender, and stratification -New social movements -Gender and deviance -Women's movements and caste-oriented movement The crucial topics of modern-day sociology such as gender, race, lifestyle changes, ecological issues, and domestic violence are explained separately, distinguishing the book from general sociology textbooks.
`This book is a must have for students and lecturers alike. Students because it gives them model essays on frequently set topics, lecturers because it gives them thumbnail overviews and up to date bibliographies on topics they might not cover in their courses. It is written without repetition - which is quite a feat - and provides authoritative statements on the state of the art in medical sociology' - Kevin White Reader in Sociology, Australian National University `The entries, written by a couple of dozen colleagues, are concise, intelligent, and full of both specific examples and theoretical trends in the field. Key Concepts will be a valuable companion to medical sociology texts and anthologies, and an important permanent reference work as well' - Phil Brown Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies, Brown University ‘It is intended to provide more depth than a dictionary or than is usually found in textbooks, and the authors achieve this objective admirably... it provides an excellent and readable introduction to the subject the subject for students whose course involves medical sociology, health researchers, or health professionals who want to understand more about the social context of their work’ –British Journal of Occupational Therapy Written with the needs of today's student in mind, the SAGE Key Concepts series provides accessible, authoritative and reliable coverage of the essential issues in a range of disciplines. Written in each case, by experienced and respected experts in the subject area, the books are indispensable study aids and guides to comprehension. Cross-referenced throughout, the format encourages understanding without sacrificing the level of detail and critical evaluation essential to convey the complexity of the issues. Key Concepts in Medical Sociology: · provides a systematic and accessible introduction to medical sociology · begins each 1500 word entry with a definition of the concept, then examines its origins, development, strengths and weaknesses ·offers further reading guidance for independent learning · draws on international literature and examples · is essential reading for undergraduates in medical sociology as well as students taking courses with a medical sociology component.
Leading scholars in the field of social networks from diverse disciplines present the first systematic and comprehensive collection of current theories and empirical research on the informal connections that individuals have for support, help, and information from other people. Expanding on concepts originally formulated by Pierre Bourdieu and James Coleman, this seminal work will find an essential place with educators and students in the fields of social networks, rational choice theory, institutions, and the socioeconomics of poverty, labor markets, social psychology, and race. The volume is divided into three parts. The first segment clarifies social capital as a concept and explores its theoretical and operational bases. Additional segments provide brief accounts that place the development of social capital in the context of the family of capital theorists, and identify some critical but controversial perspectives and statements regarding social capital in the literature. The editors then make the argument for the network perspective, why and how such a perspective can clarify controversies and advance our understanding of a whole range of instrumental and expressive outcomes. Social Capital further provides a forum for ongoing research programs initiated by social scientists working at the crossroads of formal theory and new methods. These scholars and programs share certain understandings and approaches in their analyses of social capital. They argue that social networks are the foundation of social capital. Social networks simultaneously capture individuals and social structure, thus serving as a vital conceptual link between actions and structural constraints, between micro- and macro-level analyses, and between relational and collective dynamic processes. They are further cognizant of the dual significance of the "structural" features of the social networks and the "resources" embedded in the networks as defining elements of social capital. Nan Lin is professor of sociology, Duke University. Karen Cook is Ray Lyman Wilber Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Stanford University. Ronald S. Burt is Hobart W. Williams Professor of Sociology and Strategy, University of Chicago Graduate School of Business.
This refreshing book on social research methods understands the pressures that modern students face in their work-load and supplies an authoritative study guide to the field. It will fulfil a long-standing need in undergraduate research methods courses for an unpatronising, reliable aid to making sense of research methods.
Key Concepts in Family Studie's individual entries introduce, explain and contextualize the key topics within the study of the family. Definitions, summaries and key words are developed throughout with careful cross-referencing allowing students to move effortlessly between core ideas and themes. Each entry provides clear definitions, lucid accounts of key issues, up-to-date suggestions for further reading, and informative cross-referencing. Relevant, focused and accessible this book will provide students with an indispensible guide to the central concepts of family studies.
There would be no need for sociology if everyone understood the social frameworks within which we operate. That we do have a connection to the larger picture is largely thanks to the pioneering thinker Émile Durkheim. He recognized that, if anything can explain how we as individuals relate to society, then it is suicide: Why does it happen? What goes wrong? Why is it more common in some places than others? In seeking answers to these questions, Durkheim wrote a work that has fascinated, challenged and informed its readers for over a hundred years. Far-sighted and trail-blazing in its conclusions, Suicide makes an immense contribution to our understanding to what must surely be one of the least understandable of acts. A brilliant study, it is regarded as one of the most important books Durkheim ever wrote.
Are you struggling to design your social network research? Are you looking for a book that covers more than social network analysis? If so, this is the book for you! With straight-forward guidance on research design and data collection, as well as social network analysis, this book takes you start to finish through the whole process of doing network research. Open the book and you'll find practical, 'how to' advice and worked examples relevant to PhD students and researchers from across the social and behavioural sciences. The book covers: Fundamental network concepts and theories Research questions and study design Social systems and data structures Network observation and measurement Methods for data collection Ethical issues for social network research Network visualization Methods for social network analysis Drawing conclusions from social network results This is a perfect guide for all students and researchers looking to do empirical social network research.
Concepts lie at the core of social science theory and methodology. They provide substance to theories; they form the basis of measurement; they influence the selection of cases. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide explores alternative means of concept construction and their impact on the role of concepts in measurement, case selection, and theories. While there exists a plethora of books on measurement, scaling, and the like, there are virtually no books devoted to the construction and analysis of concepts and their role in the research enterprise. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide provides detailed and practical advice on the construction and use of social science concepts; a Web site provides classroom exercises. It uses a wide range of examples from political science and sociology such as revolution, welfare state, international disputes and war, and democracy to illustrate the theoretical and practical issues of concept construction and use. It explores the means of constructing complex, multilevel, and multidimensional concepts. In particular, it examines the classic necessary and sufficient condition approach to concept building and contrasts it with the family resemblance approach. The consequences of valid concept construction are explored in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide will prove an indispensable guide for graduate students and scholars in the social sciences. More broadly, it will appeal to scholars in any field who wish to think more carefully about the concepts used to create theories and research designs. For Course Use: Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide has been written with classroom use in mind. Many of the chapters have been successfully taught at the Annual Training Institute on Qualitative Research Methods which is sponsored by the Consortium on Qualitative Research Methods. Feedback from those experiences has been incorporated into the text. Each chapter provides useful, practical, and detailed advice on how to construct, evaluate, and use concepts. To make the volume more useful, an extensive set of classroom exercises is available from the author's Web page at http://www.u.arizona.edu/~ggoertz/social_science_concepts.html. These include questions about prominent published work on concepts, measures, and case selection; in addition there are logic exercises and questions regarding large-N applications.
Persistently large external imbalances in the world economy contributed to the outbreak of the recent financial crisis. The current account imbalances were particularly severe among the economies that border on the Pacific —the United States ran large deficits, with offsetting surpluses in East Asia. The depth and breadth of the global recession also demonstrated the need for a coordination of national policies to achieve a sustained recovery. While the magnitude of global-trade disruption led to some reduction in the size of the imbalances, closer examination suggests that the progress may prove temporary. On the other hand, significant changes in the underlying patterns of saving and investment suggest that some of the recent rebalancing may prove to be more permanent. Are such imbalances really a problem? If so, why and for whom? What should be done aboutthem —if anything —and what does the future likely hold for transpacific trade relations? In this timely book, Asian and American economists explore those important questions. Copublished with the Asian Development Bank Institute, Transpacific Rebalancing is coedited by Barry Bosworth —long one of the Brookings Institution's leading economic analysts —and Masahiro Kawai, dean of the ADBI. They brought together leading economists from either side of the Pacific to analyze such issues as: • The impact of exchange rates • The policy choices facing the "Asian tigers" • The specifics and effects of trade imbalances in specific countries including the United States, South Korea, Thailand, India, and China Contributors include Hwee Kwan Chow, Susan M. Collins, Barry Eichengreen, Joonkyung Ha, Yping Huang, Ginalyn Komoto, Jong-Wha Lee, Rajiv Kumar, Deunden Nikomborirak, Gisela Rua, Lea Sumulong, Chalongphob Sussankam, Kunyu Tao, Willem Thorbecke, and Pankaj Vashisht.
Provides an introduction to core concepts in sociology. Presents both classic studies and current references to illustrate sociological concepts. Examines what sociology is, why sociology is important, and why we study it. Demonstrates how various social forces impact our lives and form our social experiences.
"This is a very useful book outlining the key concepts of the body in society. It is easy to read and provides useful examples, making it ideal for students across a range of social science disciplines." - Dr Sharron Hinchliff, Sheffield University "Cregan has achieved something distinct: an account of the sociology of the body which incorporates both theory and empirical studies, which demonstrates excellent coverage of an ever expanding field, and which is written in an accessible style... An intelligent treatment and account of the sociology of the body, which I look forward to incorporating into my teaching." - Dr Rob Meadows, University of Surrey "This book is a great idea. It provides a thorough, accessible and interesting introduction to the most important concepts in the sociology of the body. Students new to this area will find it invaluable." - Professor Deborah Lupton, University of Sydney This book provides a clear, focused road map to the study of the body in society. It defines, explains and applies core topics relating to the human body demonstrating how we approach it as a social phenomenon. Each concept: Includes an easy to understand definition Provides real-world examples Gives suggestions for further reading Is carefully cross-referenced to other related concepts. Written to meet the needs of the modern student, this book offers the basic materials, tools and guidance needed study and write about the body.

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