The seventh edition of Sociology, Work and Organisation is outstandingly effective in explaining how we can use the sociological imagination to understand the nature of institutions of work, organisations, occupations, management and employment and how they are changing in the twenty-first century. Intellectual and accessible, it is unrivalled in the breadth of its coverage and its authoritative overview of both traditional and emergent themes in the sociological study of work and organisation. The direction and implications of trends in technological change are fully considered and the book recognises the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families. Key features of the text are: clear structure; ‘key issue’ guides and summaries with each chapter; identification of key concepts throughout the book; unrivalled glossary and concept guide; rich illustrative snapshots or ‘mini cases’ throughout the book. This text engages with cutting-edge debates and makes conceptual innovations without any sacrifice to clarity or accessibility of style. It will appeal to a wide audience, including undergraduates, postgraduates and academics working or studying in the area of work and the organisation of work, as well as practitioners working in the area of human resources and management generally.
Sociology, Work and Organisation builds on the five popular and successful editions of Sociology, Work and Industry. The new text is outstanding in how effectively it explains the value of using the sociological imagination to understand the nature of institutions of work, organisations, occupations, management and employment and how they are changing in the 21st century. The book combines intellectual depth with accessible language and a user-friendly layout. It is unrivalled in the breadth of its coverage and its authoritative overview of both traditional and emergent themes in the sociological study of work and organisation. It explains the basic logic of the sociological analysis of work and the way work is organised, whilst also providing an appreciation of the different theoretical traditions which the subject draws upon. It fully considers: the direction and implication of trends in technological change, globalisation, labour markets, work organisation, managerial practices and employment relations the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families the ways in which workers challenge, resist and make their own contributions to the patterning of work and shaping of work institutions. Key features include: a new sign-posting system which integrates material and brings out themes which run through the various chapters; ‘key issue’ guides and summaries with each chapter; and the identifying of key concepts throughout the book, which are then brought together in an unrivalled glossary and concept guide at the end.
In the fourth edition of this successful and popular text, Tony Watson explains how the discipline of sociology contributes to our wider understanding of the variety of work practices and institutions, which exist in modern society. The new edition outlines both what has been achieved historically and what is currently being achieved by the sociological study of work, as well presenting a range of concepts, models and other theoretical ideas that students and researchers can apply to the study of work. Subjects covered include: * how working patterns have changed, and continued to change since the industrial revolution * work organizations * innovations in the structuring of work activities at the enterprise level * the occupational aspects of the organization of work in changing societies * how people experience and cope with the pressures, insecurities and inequalities of a restructured world of work * how challenge and resistance influence the shaping of work in an ever-changing world. Fully updated throughout, this book includes an all-new chapter on the distinctiveness of the sociological perspective along with guidance on the research and analysis of work. It will be essential reading for anybody studying the sociology of work and organizations.
This popular text effectively explains and justifies the use of the sociological imagination to understand the nature of institutions of work, occupations, organizations, management and employment, and how they are changing in the twenty-first century. With outstanding breadth of coverage, it provides an authoritative overview of both traditional and emergent themes in the sociological study of work; explains the basic logic of sociological analysis of work and work-related institutions and provides an appreciation of different theoretical traditions. It considers: the direction and implications of trends in technological change, globalization, labour markets, work organization, managerial practices and employment relations the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families the ways in which workers challenge, resist and make their own contributions to the patterning of work and shaping of work institutions. New features include an easy to read layout, key issues questions, mini case studies, chapter summaries, and a fantastic Companion Website which is packed full of useful resources (for students and teachers). All of these elements – and much more – provide the reader with a text unrivalled in the field.
This popular text effectively explains and justifies the use of the sociological imagination to understand the nature of institutions of work, occupations, organizations, management and employment, and how they are changing in the twenty-first century. With outstanding breadth of coverage, it provides an authoritative overview of both traditional and emergent themes in the sociological study of work; explains the basic logic of sociological analysis of work and work-related institutions and provides an appreciation of different theoretical traditions. It considers: the direction and implications of trends in technological change, globalization, labour markets, work organization, managerial practices and employment relations the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families the ways in which workers challenge, resist and make their own contributions to the patterning of work and shaping of work institutions. New features include an easy to read layout, key issues questions, mini case studies, chapter summaries, and a fantastic Companion Website which is packed full of useful resources (for students and teachers). All of these elements – and much more – provide the reader with a text unrivalled in the field.
Sociology is much concerned with understanding social structures and Organisational sociology gives much attention to the internal structure of the Organisations, such as the managerial hierarchy, as well as to the external structures that connect Organisations, such as strategic alliances. Organisational sociology tends to focus on work Organisation s, although it is equally concerned in principle with non-profit and other types of Organisation, and hence has particular links with other sociological approaches which also study work situations. The eminent US sociological theorist, Talcott Parsons, propounded a functionalist view of society as being a social system. Parsons saw the Organisation in this light, stressing that Organisations helped society solve adaptive problems by providing instruments capable of getting work done and attaining specific goals. While adapting to their environments in a task sense, Organisations had also to justify themselves. Parsons sees Organisations as containing three levels: the lower level focused on technical efficiency, the middle managerial level that coordinates and adapts these technical resources, and the upper or institutional level that legitimates the Organisation to the wider society. Following World War II, industrial sociology thrived for a time, developing classic studies on systems of managerial authority, the informal group behaviours that govern workplace life, and the lines of conflict that arise as workers informally negotiate with their managers. Since then, the field has fully-fledged increasingly multifaceted and internally discerned. While much research has focused on the characteristics of workers jobs other areas of concern have proliferated, including studies of new, post-bureaucratic forms of work Organisation; the influence of race and gender in shaping the allocation of workers into jobs and occupations; the distinctive features of service occupations; the operation of labour markets (whether within the firm or beyond its boundaries); and the relations between work Organisations and their wider institutional environments. Sociology, Work and Organisation is concerned with the social relations, normative codes, and Organisational structures that inform the behaviour, experience, and identities of people during the course of their working lives. It examines Organisations with courtesy to structure and objectives, interfaces among fellows and among organisations, the relationship between the Organisation and its environment and the social significance or social meaning of the Organisation.
"Connecting work and occupations to the key subjects of sociological inquiry - social and technological change, race, ethnicity, gender, social class, education, social networks, and modes of organization - An Introduction to the Sociology of Work and Occupations introduces students to highly relevant analyses of today's industrial and postindustrial society. Succinct yet comprehensive, this text provides useful analysis of a broad range of topics, covering the changes in the world of work from hunting and gathering to today's Information Age. Featuring a broad range of topics, this unique text provides crucial insight into how life and work are evolving in the 21st century." "This text is valuable for upper-level undergraduate courses such as Sociology of Work and related courses in departments of sociology, organizational behavior, economics, human resource management, and organizational studies."--Jacket.
The Introduction to Sociology series aims to present foundational sociology in a unique way. The series introduces students to debates that are current and alive in modern sociology, especially those in southern Africa. As they move from topic to topic, students will build up an advanced repetoire of technical language and concepts. Discussions are always clear and accesible. Coherently structured with a developing and cumulative theme, each book is written in a lucid, logical, and organised way, promoting the fundamental skill of sequential argument that all students must learn at university level. In addition, exercises at the end of each book are carefully constructed to develop cognitive skills. Work and Organizations is an introduction to industrial sociology, its fundamental concepts and major writers, especially those relevant to southern Africa and the developing world.
This third edition of this best-selling book confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise, and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions in key areas of sociological concern. Completely revised, this edition includes: new chapters on sexuality and the media additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body many new international and comparative examples the influence of theories of globalization and post-colonial studies. In addition, the theoretical elements have also been fully rethought in light of recent developments in social theory. Written by three experienced teachers and examiners, this book gives students of sociology and women's studies an accessible overview of the feminist contribution to all the key areas of sociological concern.
Seminar paper from the year 2000 in the subject Sociology - Work, Profession, Education, Organisation, grade: 1,3, Ashcroft International Business School Cambridge, course: Contemporary Work and Organisational Life, 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Until our century the connection between work and the apprehension of time used to be a subject that was hardly observed. One of the main reasons may well be the fact that the everyday authority of time is so complete that it is usually taken for granted and, consequently, rarely appears to be problematic. With increasing awareness of the complex time-work relation, this issue is nowadays discussed from different perspectives within as well as beyond the field of sociology. To understand the sense of time and work in present days, it is interesting to examine how it has developed in history, especially under the influence of a changing industrial system. The focus of this essay will therefore be the question how capitalism has transformed the human sense of time. To discuss this I will concentrate on the theory of E. P. Thompson, its main ideas as well as arising problems and questions. I will start by outlining this theory in detail and continue to summarise its main points of criticism in connection with Richard Whipp's idea of an alternative model of time perception. Finally, I will conclude by giving a future outlook of the problem.
Aims to bring together, present, and discuss what is known about work and organizations and their connection to broader economic change in Europe and America. This volume contains a range of theoretically informed essays, which give comprehensive coverage of changes in work, occupations, and organizations.
This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.
In the third edition of this successful and popular text, Tony Watson explains how the discipline of sociology can contribute to our wider understanding of the variety of work practices and institutions which exist in modern societies. He travels the full journey from the founding ideas of the discipline to postmodernist departures and develops all the main areas: occupations; organizations; work experience; industrial relations; industrial society and theory. The book ends with a thoroughly revised chapter covering the major questions of how work experience and global patterns of relationships are changing now and may change in the future. Thoroughly revised and presented in a new and accessible format, this third edition of "Sociology, Work and Industry" will prove an indispensable guide to a massive and complex field.
This text, specifically for AQA specifications, is designed to be easy and encouraging for students to use. The book contains updated material and activities together with a new chapter on study skills. It also indicates clearly where activities meet the new evidence requirements for key skills.
Anyone who has ever had a job has probably experienced work-related stress at some point or another. For many workers, however, job-related stress is experienced every day and reaches more extreme levels. Four in ten American workers say that their jobs are “very” or “extremely” stressful. Job stress is recognized as an epidemic in the workplace, and its economic and health care costs are staggering: by some estimates over $ 1 billion per year in lost productivity, absenteeism and worker turnover, and at least that much in treating its health effects, ranging from anxiety and psychological depression to cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Why are so many American workers so stressed out by their jobs? Many psychologists say stress is the result of a mismatch between the characteristics of a job and the personality of the worker. Many management consultants propose reducing stress by “redesigning” jobs and developing better individual strategies for “coping” with their stress. But, these explanations are not the whole story. They don’t explain why some jobs and some occupations are more stressful than other jobs and occupations, regardless of the personalities and “coping strategies” of individual workers. Why do auto assembly line workers and air traffic controllers report more job stress than university professors, self-employed business owners, or corporate managers (yes, managers!)? The authors of Work and Mental Health in Social Context take a different approach to understanding the causes of job stress. Job stress is systematically created by the characteristics of the jobs themselves: by the workers’ occupation, the organizations in which they work, their placements in different labor markets, and by broader social, economic and institutional structures, processes and events. And disparities in job stress are systematically determined in much the same way as are other disparities in health, income, and mobility opportunities. In taking this approach, the authors draw on the observations and insights from a diverse field of sociological and economic theories and research. These go back to the nineteenth century writings of Marx, Weber and Durkheim on the relationship between work and well-being. They also include the more contemporary work in organizational sociology, structural labor market research from sociology and economics, research on unemployment and economic cycles, and research on institutional environments. This has allowed the authors to develop a unified framework that extends sociological models of income inequality and “status” attainment (or allocation) to the explanation of non-economic, health-related outcomes of work. Using a multi-level structural model, this timely and comprehensive volume explores what is stressful about work, and why; specifically address these and questions and more: -What characteristics of jobs are the most stressful; what characteristics reduce stress? -Why do work organizations structure some jobs to be highly stressful and some jobs to be much less stressful? Is work in a bureaucracy really more stressful? -How is occupational “status” occupational “power” and “authority” related to the stressfulness of work? -How does the “segmentation” of labor markets by occupation, industry, race, gender, and citizenship maintain disparities in job stress? - Why is unemployment stressful to workers who don’t lose their jobs? -How do public policies on employment status, collective bargaining, overtime affect job stress? -Is work in the current “Post (neo) Fordist” era of work more or less stressful than work during the “Fordist” era? In addition to providing a new way to understand the sociological causes of job stress and mental health, the model that the authors provide has broad applications to further study of this important area of research. This volume will be of key interest to sociologists and other researchers studying social stratification, public health, political economy, institutional and organizational theory.
Since the State of Israel was established, its labor force has grown rapidly and has become increasingly diverse in terms of its demographic, cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic characteristics. Israeli work values have shifted towards greater individualism, materialism, careerism, and preference for white-collar and knowledge-based occupations is evident. A major structural change is underway, as indicated by the decline of agriculture as a component in the Israeli economy and the growth of the industrial sector--mostly towards high technology and innovative enterprises. This volume sheds light on trends and developments that have been taking place in the realm of work in Israel in recent years. It contains a unique selection of articles presenting empirical evidence of the major features and important changes characterizing work organizations and the regime of work in Israeli society: labor relations, work values, power and management in organizations, work in the Kibbutz, inter-organizational relations, women and work, migrants and minorities in the Israeli labor force. Studies show that another two major trends characterize the contemporary economy and the labor market: the trend toward privatization and globalization, the results of which are a continuous decrease of job security and an increasing level of unemployed Israeli men and women that are replaced by the low-cost labor of foreign workers emigrating from third world countries. This timely volume is valuable for its contribution to illuminating the recent changes taking place in the realm of work in Israel, and will be of interest to sociologists, social scientists, and students of Judaica.

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