A must–have textbook for any undergraduate studying solid state physics. This successful brief course in solid state physics is now in its second edition. The clear and concise introduction not only describes all the basic phenomena and concepts, but also such advanced issues as magnetism and superconductivity. Each section starts with a gentle introduction, covering basic principles, progressing to a more advanced level in order to present a comprehensive overview of the subject. The book is providing qualitative discussions that help undergraduates understand concepts even if they can?t follow all the mathematical detail. The revised edition has been carefully updated to present an up–to–date account of the essential topics and recent developments in this exciting field of physics. The coverage now includes ground–breaking materials with high relevance for applications in communication and energy, like graphene and topological insulators, as well as transparent conductors. The text assumes only basic mathematical knowledge on the part of the reader and includes more than 100 discussion questions and some 70 problems, with solutions free to lecturers from the Wiley–VCH website. The author′s webpage provides Online Notes on x–ray scattering, elastic constants, the quantum Hall effect, tight binding model, atomic magnetism, and topological insulators. This new edition includes the following updates and new features: ∗ Expanded coverage of mechanical properties of solids, including an improved discussion of the yield stress ∗ Crystal structure, mechanical properties, and band structure of graphene ∗ The coverage of electronic properties of metals is expanded by a section on the quantum hall effect including exercises. New topics include the tight–binding model and an expanded discussion on Bloch waves. ∗ With respect to semiconductors, the discussion of solar cells has been extended and improved. ∗ Revised coverage of magnetism, with additional material on atomic magnetism ∗ More extensive treatment of finite solids and nanostructures, now including topological insulators ∗ Recommendations for further reading have been updated and increased. ∗ New exercises on Hall mobility, light penetrating metals, band structure
This new edition of the well-received introduction to solid-state physics provides a comprehensive overview of the basic theoretical and experimental concepts of materials science. Experimental aspects and laboratory details are highlighted in separate panels that enrich text and emphasize recent developments. Notably, new material in the third edition includes sections on important new devices, aspects of non- periodic structures of matter, phase transitions, defects, superconductors and nanostructures. Students will benefit significantly from solving the exercises given at the end of each chapter. This book is intended for university students in physics, materials science and electrical engineering. It has been thoroughly updated to maintain its relevance and usefulness to students and professionals.
This introduction to solid-state physics emphasizes both experimental and theoretical aspects of materials science. Three important areas of modern research are treated in particular detail: magnetism, superconductivity, and semiconductor physics. Experimental aspects with examples taken from research areas of current interest are presented in the form of separate panels. This novel format, highly praised by readers of earlier editions, should help to relate the theoretical concepts described in the text to important practical applications. Students will benefit significantly from working through the problems related to each chapter. In many cases these lead into areas outside the scope of the main text and are designed to stimulate further study.
This undergraduate textbook provides an introduction to the fundamentals of solid state physics, including a description of the key people in the field and the historic context. The book concentrates on the electric and magnetic properties of materials. It is written for students up to the bachelor level in the fields of physics, materials science, and electric engineering. Because of its vivid explanations and its didactic approach, it can also serve as a motivating pre-stage and supporting companion in the study of the established and more detailed textbooks of solid state physics. The textbook is suitable for a quick repetition prior to examinations. This second edition is extended considerably by detailed mathematical treatments in many chapters, as well as extensive coverage of magnetic impurities.
Introduces students to the key research topics within modern solid state physics with the minimum of mathematics.
"Quantum Physics of the Solid State: an Introduction" Draft foreword: 26/09/03 If only this book had been available when I was starting out in science! It would have saved me countless hours of struggle in trying to apply the general ideas of the standard solid-state text-books to solve real problems. The fact is that most of the texts stop at the point where the real difficulties begin. The great merit of this book is that it describes in an honest and detailed way what one really has to do in order to understand the multifarious properties of solids in terms of the fundamental physical theory of quantum mechanics. University students of the physical sciences are taught about the fundamental the ories, and know that quantum mechanics, together with relativity, is our basis for understanding the physical world. But the practical difficulties of using quantum mechanics to do anything useful are usually not very well explained. The truth is that the application of quantum theory to achieve our present detailed understand ing of solids has required the development of a large array of mathematical tech niques. This is closely analogous to the challenge faced long ago by theoretical astronomers in trying to apply Newton's equations of motion to the heavens -they too had to develop a battery of theoretical and computational techniques to do cal culations that could be compared with observation.
While the standard solid state topics are covered, the basic ones often have more detailed derivations than is customary (with an empasis on crystalline solids). Several recent topics are introduced, as are some subjects normally included only in condensed matter physics. Lattice vibrations, electrons, interactions, and spin effects (mostly in magnetism) are discussed the most comprehensively. Many problems are included whose level is from "fill in the steps" to long and challenging, and the text is equipped with references and several comments about experiments with figures and tables.
"...an admirable book. Indeed, it scarcely needs my commendation: It is already being widely used as a graduate text on both sides of the Atlantic." Nature
This is a first undergraduate textbook in Solid State Physics or Condensed Matter Physics. While most textbooks on the subject are extremely dry, this book is written to be much more exciting, inspiring, and entertaining.
Updated to reflect recent work in the field, this book emphasizes crystalline solids, going from the crystal lattice to the ideas of reciprocal space and Brillouin zones, and develops these ideas for lattice vibrations, for the theory of metals, and for semiconductors. The theme of lattice periodicity and its varied consequences runs through eighty percent of the book. Other sections deal with major aspects of solid state physics controlled by other phenomena: superconductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties, and magnetic resonance.
This undergraduate textbook merges traditional solid state physics with contemporary condensed matter physics, providing an up-to-date introduction to the major concepts that form the foundations of condensed materials. The main foundational principles are emphasized, providing students with the knowledge beginners in the field should understand. The book is structured in four parts and allows students to appreciate how the concepts in this broad area build upon each other to produce a cohesive whole as they work through the chapters. Illustrations work closely with the text to convey concepts and ideas visually, enhancing student understanding of difficult material, and end-of-chapter exercises varying in difficulty allow students to put into practice the theory they have covered in each chapter and reinforce new concepts.
In this upper-level text, Professor Tanner introduces the reader to the behavior of electrons in solids, starting with the simplest possible model. Unlike other solid state physics texts, this book does not begin with complex crystallography, but instead builds up from the simplest possible model of a free electron in a box and introduces higher levels of complexity only when the simple model is inadequate. The approach is to introduce the subject through its historical development, and to show how quantum mechanics is necessary for an understanding of the properties of electrons in solids. The author also includes an examination of the consequences of collective behavior in the phenomena of magnetism and superconductivity. Examples and problems are included for practice.
Providing an alternative to very elementary and very advanced resources in the area, Solid State Physics: An Introduction to Theory presents an intermediate quantum approach to the properties of solids. Through this lens, the text explores different properties such as lattice, electronic, elastic, thermal, dielectric, magnetic, semiconducting, superconducting and optical and transport properties in addition to the structure of crystalline solids. The work presents the general theory for most of the properties of crystalline solids and the results for one-, two- and three-dimensional solids are derived as particular cases. The book includes a brief description of emerging topics such as quantum Hall effect and high superconductivity; a chapter on nanomaterials has been included to familiarize the students with this new field. Building from the fundamental principles and requiring only a minimal mathematical background, Solid State: An Introduction to Theory Physics includes illustrative images and solved problems in all chapters, to support student understanding. Provides an introduction to recent topics such as quantum Hall effect, high-superconductivity and nanomaterials Utilizes the Dirac' notation to highlight the physics contained in the mathematics in an appropriate and succinct manner Includes many figures and solved problems throughout all chapters, to provide a deeper understanding for students Offers topics of particular interest to engineering students, such as elasticity in solids, dislocations, polymers, point defects and nanomaterials

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