This book explores the meaning and value of music in children's lives, based upon their expressed thoughts and actual "musicking" behaviors in school and at play. Blending standard education field experiences with ethnomusicological techniques, Patricia Campbell demonstrates how music is personally and socially meaningful to children and what values they place on particular musical styles, songs, and functions. She explores musical behaviors in various contextual settings, and presents in notated narrative forms some of the "songs in their heads," balancing music learned with music "made," and intentional, purposeful music with natural music behavior. Songs in Their Heads is a vivid and engaging book that bridges the disciplines of music education, ethnomusicology, and folklore. Designed as a text or supplemental text in a variety of music education method courses, as well as a reference for music specialists and classroom teachers, this book will also appeal to parents interested in understanding and enhancing music making in their own children.
This book explores the musical interest and needs of children in their daily lives. Based upon their expressed thoughts and actual "musicking" behaviors, this text examines the songs they sing, the rythyms they make, and the roles that music plays for them. Blending standard education field experiences with ethnographic techniques, Dr. Campbell demonstrates how music is personally and socially meaningful to children and what values they place on particular musical styles, songs, and functions. He explores musical behaviors in various contextual settings, and presents in notated and narrative forms some of the "songs in their heads," balancing music learned with music "made," and intentional, purposeful music with natural musical behavior. Songs in Their Heads is a vivid and engaging book that bridges the disciplines of music education, musicology, ethnomusicology, and folklore. Designed as a text or supplemental text in a variety of music education method courses, as well as a reference for music specialists and classroom teachers, this book will also appeal to parents interested in understanding and enhancing music making in their children.
Seventeen authors, whose work represents the best of contemporary research and theory on a constellation of issues concerning the role of the arts in children's lives and learning, address critical issues of development, context, and curriculum from perspectives informed by work with children in formal and informal settings. This anthology draws on various cultural and institutional context and traditional and contemporary practices from different parts of the world.
Providing a distillation of knowledge in the various disciplines of arts education (dance, drama, music, literature and poetry and visual arts), this essential handbook synthesizes existing research literature, reflects on the past, and contributes to shaping the future of the respective and integrated disciplines of arts education. While research can at times seem distant from practice, the Handbook aims to maintain connection with the live practice of art and of education, capturing the vibrancy and best thinking in the field of theory and practice. The Handbook is organized into 13 sections, each focusing on a major area or issue in arts education research.
The Oxford Handbook of Children's Musical Cultures is a compendium of perspectives on children and their musical engagements as singers, dancers, players, and avid listeners. Over the course of 35 chapters, contributors from around the world provide an interdisciplinary enquiry into the musical lives of children in a variety of cultures, and their role as both preservers and innovators of music. Drawing on a wide array of fields from ethnomusicology and folklore to education and developmental psychology, the chapters presented in this handbook provide windows into the musical enculturation, education, and training of children, and the ways in which they learn, express, invent, and preserve music. Offering an understanding of the nature, structures, and styles of music preferred and used by children from toddlerhood through childhood and into adolescence, The Oxford Handbook of Children's Musical Cultures is an important step forward in the study of children and music.
This volume offers new research on musical creativity by experts from the fields of music education, music psychology and music therapy. Contributions focus on the composition/improvisation process, considering its conceptualization and practices in a number of contexts, and draw examples from primary and secondary schools, studio, conservatoire and university settings, as well as specialist music schools and music therapy sessions.
A guide to teaching general music in grades four to eight provides teaching principles and guidelines, advice to design lesson plans, a model curriculum, and tips on using MIDI-based instruction.
This book investigates how anthropologists can make use of the emotions fieldwork generates within them to deepen their understanding of the communities they study.
In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.
Includes record reviews.
List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction Semiconscious States: The Political and the Psychic in Urban Public Life 1 Entering the City 1 Secularism in Public Life 6 The Turkish Astronomer and the Little Prince 8 The Construction of "Turkish Culture" 10 "The Anthropology of Turkey" 12 The Not-Too-Native Anthropologist 13 Researching the Political 15 PART I: CULTURAL POLITICS 17 1. Prophecies of Culture: Rumor, Humor, and Secularist Projections about "Islamic Public Life" 19 "The Native" 19 Tales of Nightmare 22 Rumor or Reality? 29 The Issues at Stake 36 The Prophecy 40 Public Life and the Construction of "Local Culture" 42 2. The Place of Turkey: Contested Regionalism in an Ambiguous Area 44 "Turkey" as Sign 44 The History of "Region" 46 Beheadings in Saudi Arabia 51 Joining the Customs Union 55 The Place of Turkey 58 The Contest over "Region" 65 "The Middle Eastern Woman" 67 Undoing Area Studies 73 3. The Market for Identities: Buying and Selling Secularity and Islam 78 Consuming "Culture" 78 The Veil as a Commodity 82 Secularist Commodities 85 Istanbul’s New Marketplaces 90 The Islamist Department Store 94 The Trademark of Islam 98 The Force of Symbols 107 The Market for Identities 111 PART II: STATE FANTASIES 115 4. Rituals for the State: Public Statism and the Production of "Civil Society" 117 The Soldier’s Farewell 117 The Wrestler as Leviathan 122 The Flag Campaign 127 Does "Civil Society" Exist? 130 "The Transparent Reflection of Society" 137 "A Holiday of the People" 144 The Agency of "Society" 152 5. Fantasies for the State: Hype, Cynicism, and the Everyday Life of Statecraft 155 Does the "State" Exist? 155 Mundane Cynicism 166 The Truck That Crashed into the "State" 171 The Magnetism of State Crime 180 The Afterlife of the "State" 183 6. The Cult of Ataturk: The Apparition of a Secularist Leader in Uncanny Forms 188 Like a Cross That Stops the Devil . . . 190 "Visits to a Saint’s Tomb" 191 Mystical Apparitions 193 Calling Spirits 194 Numerology 195 Statues and Idols 196 Heads of State 199 Secularist Excesses 201 Notes 205 Bibliography 231 Index 241.
What is consciousness? Why and when do we have it? Where does it come from, and how does it relate to the lump of squishy grey matter in our heads, or to our material and social worlds? While neuroscientists, philosophers, psychologists, historians, and cultural theorists offer widely different perspectives on these fundamental questions concerning what it is like to be human, most agree that consciousness represents a 'hard problem'.The emergence of consciousness studies as a multidisciplinary discourse addressing these issues has often been associated with rapid advances in neuroscience-perhaps giving the impression that the arts and humanities have arrived late at the debating table. The longer historical view suggests otherwise, but it is probably true that music has been under-represented in accounts of consciousness. Music and Consciousness aims to redress the balance: its twenty essays offer a timely andmulti-faceted contribution to consciousness studies, critically examining some of the existing debates and raising new questions.The collection makes it clear that to understand consciousness we need to do much more than just look at brains: studying music demonstrates that consciousness is as much to do with minds, bodies, culture, and history. Incorporating several chapters that move outside Western philosophical traditions, Music and Consciousness corrects any perception that the study of consciousness is a purely occidental preoccupation. And in addition to what it says about consciousness the volume also presents adistinctive and thought-provoking configuration of new writings about music.
Drawing on two years of ethnographic field research among the Navajos, this book explores a controversial Native American ritual and healthcare practice: ceremonial consumption of the psychedelic Peyote cactus in the context of an indigenous postcolonial healing movement called the Native American Church (NAC), which arose in the 19th century in response to the creation of the reservations system and increasing societal ills, including alcoholism. The movement is the locus of cultural conflict with a long history in North America, and stirs very strong and often opposed emotions and moral interpretations. Joseph Calabrese describes the Peyote Ceremony as it is used in family contexts and federally funded clinical programs for Native American patients. He uses an interdisciplinary methodology that he calls clinical ethnography: an approach to research that involves clinically informed and self-reflective immersion in local worlds of suffering, healing, and normality. Calabrese combined immersive fieldwork among NAC members in their communities with a year of clinical work at a Navajo-run treatment program for adolescents with severe substance abuse and associated mental health problems. There he had the unique opportunity to provide conventional therapeutic intervention alongside Native American therapists who were treating the very problems that the NAC often addresses through ritual. Calabrese argues that if people respond better to clinical interventions that are relevant to their society's unique cultural adaptations and ideologies (as seems to be the case with the NAC), then preventing ethnic minorities from accessing traditional ritual forms of healing may actually constitute a human rights violation.
Music Learning and Teaching in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence is one of five paperback books derived from the foundational two-volume Oxford Handbook of Music Education. Designed for music teachers, students, and scholars of music education, as well as educational administrators and policy makers, the second book in this set explores a broad array of key issues, concepts, and debates related to music learning and teaching in three phases of a child's development. The first section provides an expanded view of infancy and early childhood, embracing a key theme that most young children's early music-making is improvised and used to communicate with others and the self. These chapters demonstrate the importance of "motherese" or "parentese" to young children's overall development, the extraordinary diversity and richness of children's early musical engagement, and how this can be viewed as a resource for further learning. The second section is devoted to the learning and teaching of music during the middle years of childhood, when music is often a mandated part of the school curriculum. While recognizing the enormous cultural and national differences, chapters in this section give an overview of many varied and innovative forms of musical learning and teaching globally. The authors address issues related to the types of teachers who provide music instructions to children internationally, how they were educated and trained, and how various nations organize their curriculum in ways that provide children with access and opportunities to engage with music in the classroom. The third section focuses on the musical experiences and development of adolescents aged 12 to 18. These chapters explore the role of music in the lives of young people-including how they use and relate to music, how music educators can best meet students' needs, and the types of musical engagement that can either empower or disempower students through involvement in school music. Contributors Mayumi Adachi, Randall Everett Allsup, Janet R. Barrett, Margaret S. Barrett, Brydie-Leigh Bartleet, Lily Chen-Hafteck, Richard Colwell, Sharon G. Davis, George M. DeGraffenreid, Steven C. Dillon, Magne I. Espeland, Martin Fautley, Eve Harwood, Lee Higgins, Beatriz Ilari, Neryl Jeanneret, Chee-Hoo Lum, Stephen Malloch, Esther Mang, Kathryn Marsh, Gary E. McPherson, Oscar Odena, Chris Philpott, S. Alex Ruthmann, Eric Shieh, Gary Spruce, Johannella Tafuri, Sandra E. Trehub, Colwyn Trevarthen, Kari K. Veblen, Graham F. Welch, Heidi Westerlund, Jackie Wiggins, Ruth Wright, Susan Young
This volume offers a comprehensive overview of the many facets of musical experience, behaviour and development in relation to the diverse variety of educational contexts in which they occur.
Throughout its entire history, the discipline of anthropology has been perceived as undermining, or even discrediting, Christian faith. Many of its most prominent theorists have been agnostics who assumed that ethnographic findings and theories had discredited religious beliefs. Despite being a major site of friction between faith and modern thought, the relationship between anthropology and Christianity has never before been the subject of a book-length study. Inthis groundbreaking work, Timothy Larsen examines the point where doubt and faith collide with anthropological theory and evidence.
First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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