Francis Lyall and Paul B. Larsen have been involved in teaching and researching space law for over 50 years. This new edition of their well-received text gathers together their knowledge and experience in readable form, and covers developments in all space applications, including space tourism, telecommunications, the ITU and finance. With an extensive citation of the literature, the discussion provides an excellent source for both students and practitioners.
This book is neither a historical treatise on the genesis and development of space law, nor a survey of the corpus, nor even a work of legal makebelieve, but simply an essay pursuing a line of enquiry opened up by the members of the European Centre for Space Law. It sets out to chart future trends in the light of the emergence of space law as a branch of international law and of the development of space activities themselves (new activities, new players, interpenetration of space law and national laws), a branch in which the rules and forms of international cooperation acquire a new dimension, transcending the concept of 'global' law. It is essentially prompted by a deep aspiration to see a rebirth - a revival - of that law.
The Handbook of Space Law addresses the legal and regulatory aspects of activities in outer space and major space applications from a comprehensive and structured perspective. It fundamentally addresses the dichotomy between the state-oriented characte
Written in the context of the post-9/11 legal climate, this text introduces all the major areas of aviation, covering such topics as the international air law regime, crimes involving aircraft, international air carriage, litigation management, and governmental immunity from liability.
This handbook is a reference work providing a comprehensive, objective and comparative overview of Space Law. The global space economy reached $330 billion in 2015, with a growth rate of 9 per cent vis-à-vis the previous year. Consequently, Space Law is changing and expanding expeditiously, especially at the national level. More laws and regulations are being adopted by space-faring nations, while more countries are adapting their Space Laws and regulations related to activities in outer space. More regulatory bodies are being created, while more regulatory diversity (from public law to private law) is being instituted as increasing and innovative activities are undertaken by private entities which employ new technologies and business initiatives. At the international level, Space Law (both hard law and soft law) is expanding in certain areas, especially in satellite broadcasting and telecommunications. The Routledge Handbook of Space Law summarises the existing state of knowledge on a comprehensive range of topics and aspires to set the future international research agenda by indicating gaps and inconsistencies in the existing law and highlighting emerging legal issues. Unlike other books on the subject, it addresses major international and national legal aspects of particular space activities and issues, rather than providing commentary on or explanations about a particular Space Law treaty or national regulation. Drawing together contributions from leading academic scholars and practicing lawyers from around the world, the volume is divided into five key parts: • Part I: General Principles of International Space Law • Part II: International Law of Space Applications • Part III: National Regulation of Space Activities • Part IV: National Regulation of Navigational Satellite Systems • Part V: Commercial Aspects of Space Law This handbook is both practical and theoretical in scope, and may serve as a reference tool to academics, professionals and policy-makers with an interest in Space Law.
Presents and addresses key space law and policy issues for the benefit of wider informed audiences that wish to acquaint themselves with the fundamentals of the space law field. This brief analyzes in a concise manner the combined influence of space law and policy on international space activities. Read in conjunction with the other books in the Springer ‘Space Development’ series, it supports a broader understanding of the business, economics, engineering, legal, and procedural aspects of space activities. This book will also give the casual reader as well as experts in the field insight on present and future space law and policy trends, challenges and opportunities.
International space law is less than 50 years old. Although the work on the codification of space law started in the late 1950s, the Outer Space Treaty was only adopted in January 1967. However, much earlier than that, even as early as 1932, the first ideas about legal rules for human activities in outer space were being considered. Very little is known about these early drafts and proposals, and the pioneering work of early scholars in the field remains relatively unknown. This volume seeks to redress this by analysing the biographies and contributions to international space law of eleven such early "pioneers”, whose ground-breaking and original work helped to develop the field in important ways. The collection starts in the 1930's with the Czech author Vladimir Mandl, and dwells at length on the 1950's, the early time of space flight. The section on each "pioneer" is written by different members of the International Institute of Space Law, making this a lively, fascinating and unique collection of essays, of interest to the whole community of space lawyers.
This book offers a compact - yet exhaustive - and easily comprehensible reference book that deals with the most general aspects of international air law, as well as with the constitutional issues and law-making functions of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Specialized legal literature dealing with different aspects of international air law is rare, the developments often overtake the existing writings and there is a continuous need not only for updating but also for future-oriented thinking. This book cannot fail to be of importance to anyone interested in international air law.
The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the Universal Postal Union (UPU) are the two major international organisations that are involved in the regulation of international communications. The ITU deals with electronic communications including radio. The UPU deals with mail. As such, both organisations are of major importance in modern life. This volume provides an up-to-date analysis of their development from inception to the present as they have responded to technical and political change. It also makes suggestions for the future. The volume will be an invaluable resource for researchers and students, policy-makers, government officials and administrators, and legal staff in telecommunication and postal organisations.
Abenteuerliche Reise durchs Universum Kip Russell träumt von einer Reise ins All, seit er denken kann. Bei einem Wettbewerb verpasst er knapp den ersten Preis – eine Reise zum Mond. Stattdessen gewinnt er den Trostpreis, einen Astronautenanzug. Als er dann das erste Mal in den fremdartig schimmernden Anzug schlüpft, wird sein Traum plötzlich wahr, allerdings ganz anders, als Kip es sich ausgemalt hatte: Er wird mitten ins Universum katapultiert und findet sich an Bord eines Raumschiffs wieder – als Gefangener von Piraten, die Böses im Sinn haben und keinen Heller auf sein Leben geben ...
„Max Tegmark, Prophet der Parallelwelten, flirtet mit der Unendlichkeit.“ ULF VON RAUCHHAUPT, FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE SONNTAGSZEITUNG WORUM GEHT ES? Max Tegmark entwickelt eine neue Theorie des Kosmos: Das Universum selbst ist reine Mathematik. In diesem Buch geht es um die physikalische Realität des Kosmos, um den Urknall und die „Zeit davor“ und um die Evolution des Weltalls. Welche Rollen spielen wir dabei – die Wesen, die klug genug sind, das alles verstehen zu wollen? Tegmark findet, dieses Terrain sollte nicht länger den Philosophen überlassen bleiben. Denn die Physiker von heute haben die besseren Antworten auf die ewigen Fragen. WAS IST BESONDERS? „Eine hinreißende Expedition, die jenseits des konventionellen Denkens nach der wahren Bedeutung von Realität sucht.“ BBC „Tegmark behandelt die großen Fragen der Kosmologie und der Teilchenphysik weitaus verständlicher als Stephen Hawking.“ THE TIMES WER LIEST? • Jeder, der das Universum verstehen will • Die Leser von Richard Dawkins und Markus Gabriel
Does a right to property exist under international law? The traditional answer to this question is no: a right to property can only arise under the domestic law of a particular nation. But the view that property rights are exclusively governed by national law is obsolete. Identifiable areas of property law have emerged at the international level, and the foundation is now arguably being laid for a comprehensive international regime. This book provides a detailed investigation into this developing international property law. It demonstrates how the evolution of international property law has been influenced by major economic, political, and technological changes: the embrace of private property by former socialist states after the end of the Cold War; the globalization of trade; the birth of new technologies capable of exploiting the global commons; the rise of digital property; and the increasing recognition of the human right to property. The first part of the book analyzes how international law impacts rights in specific types of property. In some situations, international law creates property rights, such as rights in aboriginal lands, deep seabed minerals, and satellite orbits. In other areas, it harmonizes property rights that arise at the national level, such as rights in intellectual property, rights in foreign investments, and security interests in personal property. Finally, it restricts property rights that may be recognized at the national level, such as rights in celestial bodies, contraband, and slaves. The second part of the book explores the thesis that a global right to property should be recognized as a general matter, not merely as a moral precept but rather as an entitlement that all nations must honour. It establishes the components of such a right, arguing that the right to property at the international level should be seen in the context of five key components of ownership: acquisition, use, destruction, exclusion, and transfer. This highly innovative book makes an important contribution to how we conceptualize the protection of property and to the understanding that much of this protection now takes place at the international level.
Recent significant developments in the European space sector have had an impact on European commercial space law. This book is an up-to-date guide to the regulatory background of space projects and examines the typical legal problems which need to be solved by practitioners in the field. Taking into account public and commercial international law and practice, this book examines substantive issues of law specific to launchers, satellite manufacturers and space service providers with contributions from leading experts and practitioners in the field of European space law and policy.
In the spirit of the 50th anniversary of the United Nations and the United Nations Decade of International Law, the contributors to "Perspectives on International Law" honour with this legal treatise a devoted friend of the United Nations and international law, Judge Manfred Lachs - a noted judge, diplomat, humanist and, above all, teacher. The work includes a variety of perspectives on international law relating to what were Judge Lachs' four main areas of interest: the theory and practice of international law, the United Nations, the World Court, and space law. The book meets the need for a reference work covering selected subject areas and providing different perspectives on some of the key issues of current concern. Many eminent experts in various fields related to international law, including Judges of the International Court of Justice, diplomats, and professors of law - most of whom knew Judge Lachs personally - have contributed. Each chapter has been prepared specifically for the book. The contributors represent all political, legal and cultural regions of the world and provide a range of backgrounds and viewpoints, offering a variety of new ideas for strengthening international law, based on their assessment of the lessons of the past.
Manfred Lachs’ famous treatise on the Law of Outer Space was originally published in 1972, yet it is still a classic and must-read text for space law students today. Issued on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the International Institute of Space Law, of which Lachs was President, this volume reproduces the original text of Lachs' work in full, with a new preface, introduction and index supplied by the editors.

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