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Excerpt from Sprague's Journal of Maine History, Vol. 8: June, 1920 The bill came up for consideration and a motion was offered to amend the bill by a provision prohibiting the further introduction of slavery into Missouri. The amendment was voted down. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
How did she navigate the world of venture capitalists and investment bankers to engineer the sale of her company and reap a personal fortune? And what does her subsequent odyssey to buy and donate a new national park in Maine’s north woods—thus repaying what she regards as the “harmonic debt to the planet” she incurred by manufacturing beauty products—tell us about America and the American dream? Queen Bee is a fascinating biography of a fascinating woman, her game-changing skin-care company, and the quest to create a national park in the north woods. A richly textured portrait of the woman who built Burt’s Bees from nothing and altered the global business of skin care. A tightly woven story of the paper-industry exodus, the giant clearance sale of the north woods, the downward spiral of paper-company towns, and the battle for a new national park. A tale of the American Dream in action— what it can do for the fortunate few who are in the right place at the right time with wits and determination, and what it can do to the unfortunate many who find themselves on the wrong side of “creative destruction.”
The history of the Revolution in Maine is the story of a people who did not really want a revolution--at least at first. Since the middle of the seventeenth century, the powerful Massachusetts Bay Colony had exercised an increasing hegemony over the settlements downeast--a hegemony legalized in the Massachusetts royal charter of 1691. From then until 1820, when it became a state, Maine remained an integral part of Massachusetts. Geographically isolated from the Bay Colony by the province of New Hampshire, and dependent on Massachusetts for its very existence, Maine was indeed a colony, in every sense of the word. The larger Massachusetts context has tended to obscure Maine as a legitimate object of study, nowhere more than in the period of the American Revolution. Even historians in Maine have slighted the period of the American Revolution. Where appropriate, town historians devote a chapter or so to the event, but only in the context of a particular community. In his book, Leamon aims to meet that deficiency by drawing together town and general histories, specialized studies, and primary sources, both published and unpublished. He examines why and how Maine fought the Revolution and the changes that occurred in Maine during and after the war.
The slate gravestones of southern Maine bear evidence to the region's fascinating history, from shipwrecks and famous wartime sea captains to countless ordinary citizens. Master stone-cutter Bartlett Adams memorialized the tragedy and triumph of the region in nearly two thousand gravestones. Examine the artistry of the headstones that mark the resting places of three generations of the same family who all went down with the schooner Charles, and discover the grief that Adams poured into the stones for his own three children. Through deep and original research, author and guide Ron Romano narrates the early history of southern Maine and one man's legacy, carved in stone.
Picturesque Sebec Lake is surrounded by the towns of Dover-Foxcroft, Bowerbank, Sebec, and Willimantic. The area’s history goes back hundreds of years to the time when Eli Towne walked through the woods and became the first settler in Southern Piscataquis. For generations, Dover-Foxcroft has drawn residents and tourists alike, eager to enjoy the lake’s scenic beauty, take in horse racing at the park, or catch a show at the opera house or the Star Theater. Four railroad stations served the five towns, making the region easily accessible. In the early years, residents found work in many industries, from the Mayo and Brown woolen mills to the Hughes organ factory.
One of the images Americans hold most dear is that of the drum-beating, fire-eating Yankee Doodle Dandy rebel, overpowering his British adversaries through sheer grit and determination. The myth of the classless, independence-minded farmer or hard-working artisan-turned-soldier is deeply ingrained in the national psyche. Charles Neimeyer here separates fact from fiction, revealing for the first time who really served in the army during the Revolution and why. His conclusions are startling. Because the army relied primarily on those not connected to the new American aristorcracy, the African Americans, Irish, Germans, Native Americans, laborers-for-hire, and "free white men on the move" who served in the army were only rarely alltruistic patriots driven by a vision of liberty and national unity. Bringing to light the true composition of the enlisted ranks, the relationships of African-Americans and of Native Americans to the army, and numerous acts of mutiny, desertion, and resistance against officers and government, Charles Patrick Neimeyer here provides the first comprehensive and historically accurate portrait of the Continental soldier.
The first complete narrative history of Captain John Smith's exploration of the New England coast
If, as many have argued, the Civil War is the most crucial moment in our national life and Gettysburg its turning point, then the climax of the climax, the central moment of our history, must be Pickett's Charge. But as Carol Reardon notes, the Civil War saw many other daring assaults and stout defenses. Why, then, is it Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg--and not, for example, Richardson's Charge at Antietam or Humphreys's Assault at Fredericksburg--that looms so large in the popular imagination? As this innovative study reveals, by examining the events of 3 July 1863 through the selective and evocative lens of 'memory' we can learn much about why Pickett's Charge endures so strongly in the American imagination. Over the years, soldiers, journalists, veterans, politicians, orators, artists, poets, and educators, Northerners and Southerners alike, shaped, revised, and even sacrificed the 'history' of the charge to create 'memories' that met ever-shifting needs and deeply felt values. Reardon shows that the story told today of Pickett's Charge is really an amalgam of history and memory. The evolution of that mix, she concludes, tells us much about how we come to understand our nation's past.
Excerpt from Piscataquis Biography and Fragments "Twice-Told Tales" would be an appropriate title to much that herein appears, some of it having previously been published in the publications of the Maine Historical Society, in the Maine Sportsman and other journals, and some are memorial proceedings in our courts as they have appeared from time to time in the Piscataquis Observer and other local papers. It is a partial history of some who have been distinguished in public life in the Pine Tree State, and who have abided in Piscataquis County and helped to make its history during a generation that is rapidly passing from earthly view. They were men of strong personalities and have made an indelible impress upon the community. With the exception of what is said of Hiram Stevens Maxim, the subjects of these sketches have all departed the scenes of this life and entered upon that "Sleep that no pain shall wake." To prepare these brief stories of these men's lives for preservation in a more permanent form has been the object of the writer. They were nearly all my friends and associates when in earth life and this has been to me a pleasant though somewhat sad duty. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Stephen Hawkings Vermächtnis In seinem letzten Buch gibt Stephen Hawking Antworten auf die drängendsten Fragen unserer Zeit und nimmt uns mit auf eine persönliche Reise durch das Universum seiner Weltanschauung. Seine Gedanken zu Ursprung und Zukunft der Menschheit sind zugleich eine Mahnung, unseren Heimatplaneten besser vor den Gefahren unserer Gegenwart zu schützen. Zugänglich und klar finden Sie in diesem Buch Hawkings Antworten auf die drängendsten Fragen unserer Zeit. - Warum gibt es uns Menschen überhaupt? - Und woher kommen wir? - Gibt es im Weltall andere intelligente Lebewesen? - Existiert Gott? - In welchem Zustand befindet sich unser Heimatplanet? - Werden wir auf der Erde überleben? - Retten oder zerstören uns Naturwissenschaften und Technik? - Hilft uns die künstliche Intelligenz, die Erde zu bewahren? - Können wir den Weltraum bevölkern? - Wie werden wir die Schwächsten – Kinder, Kranke, alte Menschen – schützen? - Wie werden wir unsere Kinder erziehen? Brillanter Physiker, revolutionärer Kosmologe, unerschütterlicher Optimist. Für Stephen Hawking bergen die Weiten des Universums nicht nur naturwissenschaftliche Geheimnisse. In seinem persönlichsten Buch beantwortet der Autor die großen Fragen des menschlichen Lebens und spricht die wichtigsten Themen unserer Zeit an. Zugänglich und klar erläutert er die Folgen des menschlichen Fortschritts – vom Klimawandel bis hin zu künstlicher Intelligenz – und diskutiert seine Gefahren. Hier finden Sie Hawkings Antworten auf die Urfragen der Menschheit. Ein großer Appell an politische Machthaber und jeden Einzelnen von uns, unseren bedrohten Heimatplaneten besser zu schützen.

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